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Full text of "Annual reports"

MEDFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, MA 



3 1848 00202 0530 




F.STABLI S5?L.r> 1940 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 



For the year ending December 31,2010 



HAPPY 70 th BIRTHDAY 



In 1940 Mr. Raymond Lord opened Lord's 
Department Store just down the street from its 
current location. Mr. Lord chose the Town of 
Medfield for his Five and Ten store based on 
market research that showed Medfield had a 
population of 3,300 residents. It was only later 
that he discovered 2,000 of those residents were 
patients at the Medfield State Hospital. 

In 1953 an employee by the name of Bill Kelly, 
who had worked for Lord's since 1940, purchased 
the business from Mr. Lord. The business 
relocated to its current location in 1957 and is 
currently run by the next generation of the Kelly 
family. 

Lord's Department store has been an integral part 
of the community and the downtown since 1940. 
The Town looks forward to the next seventy years! 



Cover by: 

Phyllis Cerel Community Resource Publishing and James Dodd ImPact 
Design 




th 



360 Anniversary 



ANNUAL REPORT 



IN MEMORIAM 



Bruce O. Tobiasson 

Board of Water & Sewerage, Long Range Planning, 
High School Music Association 

Gwendolen Kingsbury Suereth 

Board of Assessors Administrative Secretary 
1947-1976 

Marie Roberts 

Medfield Housing Authority 

G. Marshall Chick 

Veterans' Service Officer, Committee to Study Memorials, 

Memorial Day Committee, Baxter Park Flag Pole Committee, 

Election Officer, School Committee, 

Land Acquisition, Cemetery Commissioner 

Anna M. Murphy 

Board of Registrars 

Michael Joseph Kosc 

Warrant Committee 

Mildred Willis 

Planning Board and Board of Appeals on Zoning 

Administrative Secretary 

1968-1991 

Permanent School Planning & Building Committee 



STATE 






SENATORS AND REPRESENTATIVES 
FOR MEDFIELD 



Senator in General Court 

Norfolk, Bristol, and Plymouth 

District 

James E. Timilty 

State House Room 5 1 8 

Boston, MA 02 133 

(617)722-1222 

james.timilty@state.ma.us 



Representative in General Court 

13 tfl Norfolk District, Precinct 1 & 2 

Lida Harkins 

State House Room 167 

Boston, MA 02133 

(617)722-2230 

Rep. LidaHarkins@hou. state. ma.us 

Representative in General Court 

9th Norfolk District, Precinct 3 & 4 

Richard Ross 

State House Room 237 

Boston, MA 02 133 

(617)722-2305 

Richard. ross@state. ma. us 



Governor's Councillor 

2 nd District 
Kelly A. Timilty 
State House Room 1 84 
Boston, MA 02 133 

(617)727-2795 



FEDERAL 




U.S. Representative to Congress, 9 n District 
Stephen F. Lynch 

88 Black Falcon Avenue, Suite 340 
Boston, MA 02210 
(617)428-2000 
stephen.lynch@mail.house.gov 

United States Senator 

Scott Brown 

2400 J.F.K. Federal Building 

Boston, MA 02203 

(617)565-3170 



United States Senator 

John F. Kerry 

1 Bowdoin Square, 10 th Floor 

Boston, MA 02 114 

(617)565-8519 

john_kerry@kerry.senate.gov 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 



Incorporated 


1651 




Population 


1 2,8 1 5 as of December 3 1 , 20 1 




County 


Norfolk 




Size 


14.43 square miles 




Miles of Highway 


74.72 




Elevation 


1 80 feet above sea level at the Town House 




Registered Voters 


8,442 as of December 3 1 , 2010 






Democrats 


1,735 




Republicans 


1,439 




No Party or Designation 


5,240 




Other 


28 


Government 


Board of Selectmen 





Official Notices 



Annual Town Election is the last Monday in March 
Open Town Meeting is the last Monday in April 

All Town Board and Commission meetings are posted on 
the Town House bulletin board 



Tax Rate 

Taxes Due 

Town House Hours 



Library Hours 

Winter Hours 
September to May 

Summer Hours 
June to August 



14.24 per thousand of assessed valuation (7/1/09-6/30/10) 
15.02 per thousand of assessed valuation (7/1/10-6/30/1 1) 

August 1 st , November 1 st , February 1 st , and May 1 st 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM 
Thursday, 8:30 AM to 7:30 PM 
Friday, 8:30 AM to 1:00 PM 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10AM to 6PM 

Tuesday, Thursday 12PM to 9PM 

Saturday 10AM to 5PM, Sunday 2PM to 5PM 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1 0AM to 6PM 
Tuesday, Thursday 1 2PM to 9PM 
Saturday 10AM to 2PM, Sunday Closed 



Transfer Station 



Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, 9 AM to 4 PM 



ELECTED AND APPOINTED OFFICIALS 

2010 



Elected Officials 

Moderator 

Scott F. McDermott 2010 

To>vn Clerk 

Carol A. Mayer 2012 

Board of Selectmen 

Ann B. Thompson 2010 

Mark L.Fisher 2011 

Osier P. Peterson 2012 

Board of Assessors 

R. Edward Beard 2010 

Thomas Sweeney 2011 

Francis W. Perry 2012 

School Committee 

Timothy J. Bonfatti 2010 

Susan C. Cotter 2011 

Debra Noschese 2011 

Susan L. Ruzzo 2012 

Chris Morrison 2013 

Trustees of the Public 
Library 

James J. Whalen 2010 

Robert Luttman 2010 

IsobelPalson 2011 

JohnBankert 2011 

Maura Y. McNicholas 2012 

Steven Pelosi 2012 

Planning Board (5 Years) 

George N. Lester 2010 

Stephen J. Browne 201 1 

Keith Diggans 2012 

Wright Dickinson 2013 

Elissa G. Franco 2014 



Park and Recreation 
Commissioners 

Mel Seibolt 2010 

S. Anthony Burrell, resigned 2010 

LisaLouttit 2011 

Stephen Farrar, resigned 201 1 

Thomas A. Caragliano 2012 

Housing Authority 

L. Paul Galante, resigned 2010 

EldredWhyte 2012 

Maureen Daniels 2013 

Lisa Donovan 2014 

Roberta Lynch 2015 

Valerie A. Mariani, state appt. 20 1 1 

Trust Fund Commissioners 

H. Tracy Mitchell 2011 

Georgia Colivas 2012 

Gregory Reid 2013 



Appointed by the 
Board of Selectmen 
Fire Chief 

William A. Kingsbury 



Chief of Police 

Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 

Sergeants 

John L. Mayer 
John W. Wilhelmi 
Ray M. Burton 
Daniel J. Burgess 
Lorna C. Fabbo 

Police Officers 

Larz C. Anderson 
Michelle Bento 
Christine DiNatale 
Robert G. Flaherty 
Dana P. Friend 



2013 



2012 



2011 
2011 
2011 
2011 
2011 



2011 
2011 
2011 
2011 

2011 



John D. Geary 


2011 


Superintendent of Insect Pest 


Stephen H. Grover 


2011 


Control 


Thomas M. LaPlante 


2011 


Edward M. Hinkley 2011 


James O'Neil 


2011 




Wayne Sallale 


2011 


Tree Warden 

Edward M. Hinkley 2011 



Town Administrator 

Michael J. Sullivan 

Treasurer/Collector 

Georgia K. Colivas 



2013 



2013 



Superintendent of Public Works 

Kenneth P. Feeney 2012 

Town Accountant 

Joy Ricciuto 2012 

Town Counsel 

Mark G. Cerel 

Board of Health (3 years) 

Elizabeth Dorisca, resigned 
Kathleen Schapira 
Marcia Aigler 
Kathleen Rose 
Melissa Savlionis 

Cemetery Commissioners (3 years) 

Marshall Chick, deceased 
Al Manganello 
Thomas Sweeney 
Frank Iafolla 

Robert Gregg, Associate 
David Temple, Associate 

Water and Sewer Commissic 

(3 years) 

Marc R. Tishler, resigned 

Willis Peligian 

Jeremy Marsette 2012 

Gary A. Lehmann 2013 



Field Driver and Fence Viewer 

Walter Tortorici 2011 

Animal Control Officer 

Jennifer Shaw Gates 2011 

Inspector of Animals 

Jennifer Shaw Gates 20 1 1 

Norfolk County Advisory Board 

Kenneth P. Feeney 201 1 



2012 


Pound Keeper 






Jennifer Shaw Gates 


2011 


2010 


Inspection Department 




2011 


Walter Tortorici, Bidg inspector 


2011 


2012 


John Mahoney, Asst. Building 


2011 


2013 


Joseph Doyle, Alternate Building 


2011 


2013 


Peter Navis, Gas, Asst. 






Plumbing 


2011 


C/lfKi 


John A. Rose, Jr., Plumbing, 




2011 


Asst. Gas 


2011 


John F. Fratolillo, Asst. Plumb.. 




2011 


Asst. Gas 


2011 


2012 


James J. Leonard, wiring 




2013 


Inspector 


2011 


2011 


Joseph Wallace, Asst. Wiring 


2011 


2011 


William F. McCarthy, Asst. 






Wiring 


2011 


ers 


Peter Diamond, Asst. wiring 


2011 


2011 


Official Greeter of the Town 




2011 


Joseph E. Ryan 


2011 



Official Historian 

Richard P. DeSorgher 



2011 



Official Keepers of the Town Clock 

Marc R. Tishler 2011 

David P. Maxson 201 1 

Board of Registrars (Syr) 

William Gallagher 2012 

L. David Alinsky 2012 

William H. Dunlea, Jr. 2010 

Veterans' Service Officer (3) 

Ron Griffin 2012 

G. Marshall Chick, deceased 2012 

Sealer of Weights and Measures (3) 

Michael J. Clancy 2012 

Measurer of Wood and Bark (3) 

Michael J. Clancy 2012 



Public Weigher (3) 

Michael J. Clancy 



2012 



Constables and Keepers 


of the 


Lockup 




Larz C. Anderson 


2011 


Michelle Bento 


2011 


Daniel J. Burgess 


2011 


Ray M. Burton, Jr. 


2011 


Christine DiNatale 


2011 


Lorna C. Fabbo 


2011 


Robert B. Flaherty 


2011 


Dana P. Friend 


2011 


John D. Geary 


2011 


John F. Gerlach 


2011 


Stephen H. Grover 


2011 


Thomas M. LaPlante 


2011 


John L. Mayer 


2011 


James O'Neil 


2011 


Louise Papadoyiannis 


2011 


Daniel Pellegrini 


2011 


Wayne Sallale 


2011 


Thomas A. Tabarani 


2011 


John W. Wilheimi 


2011 



Police Matrons 

Lorna C. Fabbo 2011 

Sandra Cronin 2011 

Jennifer A. Shaw Gates 201 1 

Elizabeth R. Hinkley 2011 

Elisabeth T. Mann 2011 

Louise Papadoyiannis 201 1 

Audra Wilheimi 2011 

MaryL. Solari 2011 

Sally Wood 2011 

Special Police Officers 

Leo Acerra (Minis) 20 1 1 

Paul J. Adams (Minis) 201 1 

George Bent (Norfolk) 20 1 1 

Dale Bickford (Minis) 2011 

Herbert Burr 2011 

Ray M. Burton, III 2011 

Jonathan M. Caroll (Norfolk) 201 1 

Jon Cave 2011 

Ryan Chartrand (Norfolk) 201 1 

Sandra Cronin 2011 

William J. Davis (Norfolk) 201 1 
Thomas G. Degnim (Norfolk) 201 1 

Robert A. Dixon (Mfflis) 201 1 

Louis Droste (Norfolk) 201 1 

William J. Dwyer (Mfflis) 20 1 1 

David J. Eberle (Norfolk) 201 1 

Leo Either (Norfolk) 20 1 1 

Glen R. Eykel (Norfolk) 20 1 1 

Edgardo Feliciano, Jr. 201 1 

Nathan Fletcher (Norfolk) 20 1 1 

Susan Fornaciari (Norfolk) 2011 

Robert Forsythe (Norfolk) 201 1 

Terence Gallagher (Norfolk) 201 1 

John Gerlach 2011 

Barry Glassman 201 1 

Thomas Hamano 201 1 

Timothy Heinz (Norfolk) 201 1 

John Holmes (Norfolk) 20 1 1 

David Holt (Norfolk) 20 1 1 

Robert Hoist (Norfolk) 2011 

Richard D. Hurley 2011 

Winslow Karlson III (Norfolk) 201 1 

PaulKearns 2011 



Stephen Kirchdorfer 20 1 1 

James C. Kozak (Norfolk) 201 1 

Robert LaPlante 2011 

James Lopez (Millis) 201 1 

Peter Lown (Norfolk) 2011 

Robert Maraggio (Minis) 2011 

Kristofer Maxant (Minis) 2011 

Chris MaClure (Norfolk) 201 1 

David R. McConnell tNorfoikj 201 1 

Peter McGowan (Millis) 201 1 

Nicholas Meleski (Millis) 201 1 

Robert Miller (Norfolk) 201 1 

Paul J. Murphy (Norfolk) 201 1 

Linda Meyers (Millis) 2011 

Robert Nedder 2011 

Peter Opanasets (Minis) 2011 

Stephen Plympton (Norfolk) 20 1 1 

Amanda Prata (Norfolk) 201 1 

Thomas Quinn (Millis) 201 1 

Kevin Roake (Norfolk) 201 1 

Christina Sena (Norfolk) 201 1 

Viriato Sena (Norfolk) 20 1 1 

Robert Shannon (Norfolk) 201 1 

Paul Smith (Millis) 2011 
Christopher Soffayer (Millis) 201 1 

Charles Stone (Norfolk) 201 1 

Richard Strauss 2011 

Thomas Tabarini 2011 

Domenic Tiberi (Millis) 2011 

Eric Van Ness (Norfolk) 2011 

MarkVendetti 2011 

Robert P. Vitale 2011 

James Wells 2011 

Audra Wilhelmi 2011 

Ryan Wilhelmi 2011 

Sally Wood 2011 

Emergency Management Agency 

Ray M. Burton, Director 201 1 

Arline F. Berry 2011 

Scott Brooks 2011 

Ray M. Burton III 2011 

Jon R. Cave 2011 

Norma Cronin 2011 

Sandra Cronin 20 1 1 



Barry Glassman 


2011 


Neil I. Grossman 


2011 


Thomas S. Hamano 


2011 


Paul Kearns 


2011 


Richard D. Hurley 


2011 


Steven Krichdorfer 


2011 


Charles A. Morreale 


2011 


John L. Parsons 


2011 


Donald W. Reed 


2011 


Wayne A. Sallale 


2011 


Richard D. Strauss 


2011 


James Wells 


2011 


Sally Wood 


2011 


Traffic Supervisors 




Angela Brown 


2011 


William Fitzpatrick 


2011 


John T. Garvey 


2011 


Jennifer A. Gates 


2011 


John F. Gerlach 


2011 


Elizabeth R. Hinkley 


2011 


Richard D. Hurley 


2011 


George W. Kingsbury 


2011 


Robert T. LaPlante 


2011 


Elisabeth T. Mann 


2011 


William H. Mann 


2011 


Louise Papadoyiannis 


2011 


Kevin Robinson 


2011 


Lori Sallee 


2011 


Mary L. Solari 


2011 


Richard Strauss 


2011 


Thomas E. Tabarini 


2011 


William Walter 


2011 


Affordable Housing Committee 


Bonnie Wren-Burgess 


2011 


Charles H. Peck 


2011 


Diane L. Maxson 


2011 


Stephen M. Nolan 


2011 


Joseph Zegarelli 


2011 


John W. McGeorge 


2011 


Jeffrey Hanson 


2011 


Fred Bunger 


2011 


Kristine Trierweiler, Ex officio 


2011 


Ann B. Thompson, Ex officio 


2011 



Council on Aging 






Neal Sanders 


2011 


Louis Fellini 




2010 


Betty Sanders 


2011 


Patricia Shapiro 




2010 






Michael Clancy 




2011 


Conservation Commission 


(Syr) 


Neil DuRoss 




2012 


Deborah Bero 


2011 


Virginia Whyte 




2012 


Michael Perloff 
Philip J. Bun- 


2011 
2011 


Americans with Disabilities 




Robert Kennedy, Jr. 


2012 


Compliance Review 


Committee 


Ralph Parmigiane 


2013 


Kenneth P. Feeney 




2011 


Robert Aigler 


2013 


Michael J. Sullivan 




2011 


Bradford Garnett, resigned 


2013 



Frederick A. Rogers 201 1 

Tina Costentino 2011 

Board of Appeals on Zoning 

Russell J. Hallisey 2011 

Stephen M. Nolan 2012 

Robert F. Sylvia 2013 

Charles H. Peck, Assoc (J) 2010 

Thomas M. Reis, Assoc (i) 20 1 

Douglas C . Boyer, Assoc (i) 2010 

Medfield Cultural Council 

David Temple 2011 

Diane Wanucha 201 1 

Ron Gustavson 2012 

Lucinda Davis 2012 

Jean Mineo 2012 

Patricia Pembroke 2012 

William F. Pope 2013 

Charles River Natural Storage 
Area Designees 

Kenneth P. Feeney 201 1 

Michael J. Sullivan 2011 

Collective Bargaining Team 

Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 201 1 

Ann B. Thompson 201 1 

William Kingsbury 2011 

Rachel Brown 2011 

David Fischer 2011 

Kristine Trierweiler 201 1 

Community Gardens Committee 



Constables for Election 

Carol A. Mayer 



2011 



Contract Compliance Officer 

Michael J. Sullivan 2011 

Economic Dev. Commission (Syr) 

Joseph Scier 2011 

Patrick Casey 2011 

Charles Peck 2012 

Ann B . Thompson 20 1 3 

Paul E. Hinkley 2013 

Representative to Regional 
Hazardous Waste Committee 

Kenneth P. Feeney 201 1 

Capital Budget Committee 

Mark Fisher 2011 

Donald H. Harding 2011 

Maryalice Whalen 2011 

Kristine Trierweiler 201 1 

Timothy P. Sullivan 2011 

Joy Ricciuto 2011 

Charles Kellner 2011 



Emergency Medical Services 
Response Committee 

David Binder, M.D. 2011 

William A. Kingsbury 201 1 

Joan M. Kiessling 201 1 

Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 20 1 1 



Michael J. Sullivan 
Ann B. Thompson 



2011 
2011 



Emergency Planning Commission 

Kenneth P. Feeney 201 1 

Edward M. Hinkley 2011 

Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 2011 

William A. Kingsbury 201 1 

Michael J. Sullivan 2011 

Ann B. Thompson 201 1 

Enforcing Officer for Zoning 

Walter Tortorici 2011 

Enterprise Fund Committee 

Georgia K. Colivas 201 1 

Kenneth P. Feeney 201 1 

Michael J. Sullivan 2011 

Marc R. Tishler 2011 

Kristine Trierweiler 201 1 

Joy Ricciuto 2011 



Fair Housing Officer 

Michael J. Sullivan 



201 



Geographical Information System 

Robert Kennedy, Jr. 20 1 1 

Sandra H. Frigon 201 1 

Gary A. Lehmann 201 1 

Marie Zack Nolan 2011 

Michael Perloff 2011 

Michael J. Sullivan 2011 

Kristine M. Trierweiler 201 1 

Carol A. Mayer 2011 

Historical Commission (Syr) 

Burgess P. Standley, resigned 201 1 

David F. Temple 2011 

Daniel Bibel 2012 

Sarah Murphy 2012 

Charles Navratil 2013 

Maria C. Baler 2013 

Ancelin Wolfe 2013 

Richard P. DeSorgher, Assoc 201 1 

Deborah Gaines, Associate 201 1 



David R. Sharff, Associate 201 1 

Michael R. Taylor, Associate 201 1 

John A. Thompson, Associate 201 1 

Clara B. Doub, Associate 201 1 

Patricia Iafolla Walsh, 

Associate 2.0 1 1 

Historic District Commission (Syr) 

Connie Sweeney 201 1 

David R. Sharff 2011 

Michael Taylor 2013 

Barbara Jacobs 2013 

Burgess P. Standley, resigned 2012 

Insurance Advisory Committee 

Michael J. Sullivan 2011 

Peter Moran 2011 

Rachel Brown 2011 

Selectmen's Insurance Advisory 
Committee 

Peter Moran 2011 

Rachel Brown 2011 

Jane Volden, resigned 201 1 

Employees Insurance Advisory 
Committee 

Nancy Deveno 201 1 

Joanne Schmidt 201 1 

PaulNorian 2011 

Susan Parker 2011 

Michelle Bento 2011 

JohnWilhelmi 2011 

Joy Ricciuto 2011 

Malcolm Gibson 2011 

Local Auction Permit Agent 

Evelyn Clarke 2011 

Local Water Resource 
Management Official 

Kenneth P. Feeney 201 1 

Medfield MBTA Advisory Board 
Designee 



Michael J. Sullivan 


2011 


Christopher Lennon 


2011 






Michael J. Sullivan 


2011 


Metropolitan Area Planning 








Council 




Solid Waste Study Committee 


Anthony Centore 


2011 


Kenneth P. Feeney 


2011 






Kristine Trierweiler 


2011 


Memorial Day Committee 




Ann B. Thompson 


2011 


Donna Dragotakes 


2011 


Scott Colwell 


2011 


Robert E. Meaney 


2011 


Anthony Centore 


2011 


William A. Kingsbury 


2011 


Carl Mellea 


2011 


Jane M. Lomax 


2011 


Megan Sullivan 


2011 


Albert J. Manganello 


2011 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2011 


William H. Mann 


2011 






Ann B. Thompson 


2011 


Technology Study Committee 


Michelle Doucette 


2011 


Alan Joffe 


2011 


G. Marshall Chick, deceased 


2011 


Gary Lehmann 


2011 


Evelyn Clarke 


2011 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2011 


Frank Iafolla 


2011 


Kristine Trierweiler 


2011 






Ron Gustavson 


2011 


Committee to Study Memorials 


Robert Luttman 


2011 


Richard P. DeSorgher 


2011 






G. Marshall Chick, deceased 


2011 


Three Rivers Interlocal Council 


Jane M. Lomax 


2011 


(MAPC) 




David F. Temple 


2011 


Anthony Centore 


2011 


Frank Iafolla 


2011 







Municipal Census Supervisor 

Carol A. Mayer 2011 

Representatives to Neponset 
Watershed Initiative Committee 

Michael J. Sullivan 2011 



Elderly Taxation Aid Committee 

Georgia Colivas 201 1 

Clara B.Doub 2011 

Michael J. Sullivan 2011 

Frank Perry 2011 

Roberta Lynch 2011 





Downtown Study Committee 




Parking Clerk and Hearing Officer 


Robert Dugan 


2011 


Carol A. Mayer 2011 


Brandi Erb 


2011 




Mark Fisher 


2011 


Right-To-Know Coordinator 


Robert MacLeod 


2011 


William A. Kingsbury 20 1 1 


Nancy Kelly Lavin 


2011 




Richard DeSorgher 


2011 


Wireless Communications Study 


Frank Perry, Associate 


2011 


Committee 






David P. Maxson 201 1 






Willis H. Peligian, resigned 201 1 


Medfield Energy Committee 




Charles Mapps 2011 


Lee Alinsky 


2011 


Thomas Powers 20 1 1 


Fred Bunger 


2011 



10 



Penni Conner 




2011 


David LaFreniere 


2011 


Fred Davis 




2011 


Michael Perloff 


2011 


Cynthia Greene 




2011 


Mel Seibolt 


2011 


Maureen Howells 




2011 






Charles Kellner 




2011 


Lyme Disease Study 


Committee 


Marie Nolan 




2011 


Christine Kaldy 


2011 


James Redden 




2011 


Lisa Dolan 


2011 


Emre Schveighoffer 




2011 


Abby Marble 


2011 


Michael J. Sullivan, 


Ex Officio 


2011 


Carolyn Samson 


2011 


Osier P. Peterson, E> 


' Officio 


2011 


Melissa Savilionis 
Erica Reilly 


2011 
2011 


Permanent Building Committee 


Nancy Schiemer 


2011 


Timothy Bonfatti 




2011 


Theodore Carlson 


2011 


Thomas Erb 




2011 


Lester Hartman, MD, 


ex officio 2011 


William Gallagher 




2011 






Neil MacKenzie 




2011 


Appointed bv the 




John Nunnari 




2011 


Treasurer/Collector 




Michael J. Sullivan, 


Ex Officio 


2011 


Clara DeVasto, retired 


2011 


Kenneth P. Feeney, 


Ex Officio 


2011 


Meline Karapetian 
Diane Adair 


2011 
2011 


State Hospital Environmental 


Susan Cronin 


2011 



Review Committee 

Deborah T. Bero 2011 

William R. Domey 2011 

Ralph Telia 2011 

John Thompson 201 1 

Cole Worthy 2011 

Grist Mill Study Committee 

Caroline Maider 201 1 

Elizabeth Russell 2011 

Michael J. Sullivan, Ex Officio 201 1 



Appointed by the Town Clerk 

Norma Cronin, Asst Town clerk 20 1 1 

Appointed by the Chairman of the 
Selectmen, Chairman of the School 
Committee and the Town 
Moderator 

Vocational School Committee 
Representative 

Karl D. Lord June 30, 2013 



Safety Committee 








Christian Donner 


2011 


Appointed by the Fire Chief 




Andrew Thompson 


2011 


Charles G. Seavey, Deputy chief 


2011 


Robert Meaney 


2011 


David C. O'Toole, Captain 


2011 


Kenneth Feeney 


2011 


Jeffrey Bennotti, Lt 


2011 


Michael J. Sullivan 


2011 


Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr., Lt 


2011 


Open Space and Recreation 




Appointed by the Board of Health 


Committee 




William R. Domey, P.E. 


2011 


Robert Aigler 


2011 


Nancy Bennotti 


2011 


S. Anthony Burrell, resigned 


2011 






Thomas A. Caragliano 


2011 


Appointed by the Moderator 





11 



Deputy Moderator 




Thomas D. Erb 


2011 


Conrad J. Bletzer 


2011 


Thomas J. Roy croft 


2011 






Matthew McCormick 


2011 


Warrant Committee 








James Shannon, resigned 


2010 






Diane Hallisey 


2011 






James CTShaughnessy 


2011 






Maryalice Whalen 


2011 






Gus Murby 


2012 






Catherine Steever 


2012 






David Fischer 


2012 






Gregory Sullivan 


2013 






Debbie Mozer 


2013 






Thomas J. Schlesinger 


2013 







Permanent School Building and 
Planning Committee 

David Binder 2010 

C . Richard McCullough 2010 

Keith Mozer 2010 

Timothy J. Bonfatti 2010 

Susan C. Cotter 2010 

Appointed by the Town Moderator, 
Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen, and Chairman of the 
Warrant Committee 



Personnel Board 




Debra Shuman 


2012 


Christine Connelly 


2013 


Rachel Brown, Associate 


2011 


Appointed by the Planning 


Board 



Long Range Planning Committee 

Robert F. Tormey, Jr. 201 1 

Peter J. Fellman 2011 

Margaret H. Gryska 201 1 

Burgess P. Standley 2011 

Keith R. Diggans 2011 

Sign Advisory Board 

Alfred J. Bonoldi 2011 

Jeffrey Hyman 2011 



12 



MEETING SCHEDULE 



Name 


Day 


Time 


Location 


Annual Town 


Last Monday in March 


6:00 AM to 


Center at 


Election 




8:00 PM 


Medfield 


Annual Town 


Last Monday in April 


7:30 PM 


High School 


Meeting 








Appeals Board 


Wednesday as needed 


7:30 PM 


Town House 


Board of Assessors 


3 rd Thursday 


7:30 AM 


Town House 


Board of Health 


1 st and 3 rd Wednesday 


6:30 PM 


Town House 


Cultural Council 


Biannually 


8:00 PM 


Town House 


Conservation 


1 st and 3 rd Thursday 


7:30 PM 


Town House 


Historical 


3 rd Wednesday 


8:00 PM 


Town House 


Commission 








Housing Authority 


2 nd Wednesday 


6:30 PM 


Tilden Village 


Library Trustees 


2 nd Tuesday 


7:30 PM 


Library 


MEMA 


1 st Tuesday 


7:00 PM 


Medfield State 


Park and 


2 nd and 4 th Tuesday 


7:30 PM 


Pfaff Center 


Recreation 








Planning Board 


Mondays 


8:00 PM 


Town House 


School Committee 


1 st and 3 rd Monday 


7:30 PM 


High School 




Monthly (July-August) 


7:30 PM 


High School 


Selectmen 


Tuesdays 


7:00 PM 


Town House 


Warrant Committee 


Tuesdays (Nov. -May) 


7:30 PM 


Town House 


Water and Sewer 


1 st and 3 rd Thursday 


7:00 PM 


Town House 



13 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2010 



14 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Residents of Medfield: 

The Board reorganized for the ensuing year in March and elected Mr. Mark 
Fisher, Chairman and Mr. Osier L. Peterson Clerk. Mrs. Ann Thompson was 
elected by the Townspeople, and was the third member of the Board. This will be 
Mrs. Thompson's tenth term serving as a member of the Selectmen. 

Medfield State Hospital 

The environmental cleanup is ongoing at the Medfield State Hospital. The Board 
of Selectmen appointed SHERC committee is monitoring this cleanup with the 
assistance of a Licensed Site Professional, on behalf of the Town. The cleanup is 
being conducted by the Division of Capital Asset Management who maintains 
care and control of the property for the Commonwealth. DCAM has committed 
to holding quarterly environmental meetings to continue to keep residents and 
officials updated on the cleanup efforts. An extensive library of materials 
regarding the environmental issues has been placed on the Town's website and at 
the Public Library. 

The current redevelopment plan for the site proposes 440 units of housing which 
include a mix of senior housing, condominiums, apartments and single family 
homes. The Massachusetts State Legislature has approved the legislation for the 
redevelopment. The Planning Board has been working towards the development 
of an overlay zoning district that would allow for the reuse of the state hospital as 
laid out in the legislation. The overlay district is a zoning change and will require 
a two-thirds vote of a special town meeting. At this time a Special Town 
Meeting has not been called. 

Single Stream Recycling 

Single stream recycling kicked off at the Transfer Station this year. Single 
stream recycling allows residents to place all recyclables into one bin without any 
separation. The mixed materials are then sent to a single stream facility where it 
is sorted into separate commodity streams for reuse. The number one goal of 
single stream recycling is to increase the percentage of recycling by Medfield 
residents, which in turn will decrease the amount of trash we are paying to 
dispose of at the Millbury Incinerator. The amount of recycling has increased 
since the Town switched to this process but we are looking to make even greater 
strides in 2011! 

Lyme Disease Study Committee 

The Board of Selectmen formed the Lyme Disease Study Committee in 2010 to 
address the ever increasing number of cases of Lyme Disease in Medfield. The 
Committee was tasked with several items including how to address the problem 

15 



of Lyme Disease at a Regional level as well as how to address the deer 
population in Medfield. The Committee held their first meeting in September and 
hit the ground running. The main topic of discussion this fall has been how to 
cull the deer herd in Medfield, what the other towns in the region are doing to 
address the issue, and continue the ongoing educational efforts begun by the 
Board of Health. 

Personnel 

The Board of Selectmen would like to congratulate the Department of Public 
Works Superintendent Kenneth P. Feeney. In May, Mr. Feeney was the recipient 
of the Massachusetts Highway Association's J. Francis Granger Award. The 
award is giving annually for recognition of distinguished and meritorious 
achievement in the highway field in the Commonwealth. 

Flooding 

In March and April the region received a record rainfall that saw the Charles 
River at an over crest of more than eight feet which lead to numerous road 
closures. The Department of Public Works, the Police Department and the Fire 
Department worked tirelessly to ensure the safety of the roads and the residents 
while also providing pumping services for many of the flooded basements 
throughout town. 

Throughout the report you will see pictures of some of the areas that experienced 
the heaviest flooding including Noon Hill Road, Main Street, Causeway Street, 
Elm Street, North Street, Hartford Street and Orchard Street. 

The Board of Selectmen encourages all residents of the Town to participate in 
town government by volunteering, attending meetings and most importantly to 
vote at town elections and attend the Annual Town Meeting. It is you, the 
residents of Medfield that are the legislative body of our local government. 

The Board of Selectmen would like to acknowledge that it is the generous 
contributions by town employees, committee members and countless volunteers 
who assist the Board of Selectmen and the Town in maintaining our small town 
atmosphere. It is this strong sense of community in our Town that continues to 
assure that Medfield will be a desirable place to live now and in the future. 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Mark L. Fisher, Chairman 
Osier L. Peterson, Clerk 
Ann B. Thompson 



16 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my 29 th Annual Report for the Public Works Department. 

DRAINAGE 

Maintenance: The Highway Department removed and reconstructed six catch 
basins at the Elm Street School, Kenney Road, Indian Hill Road, Alder Road and 
Juniper Lane. 

Projects: The Highway Department has completed projects located on Green 
Street and Adams Street. The drainage projected consisted of the installation of 
1400 feet of 12-inch High Density Polyethylene, 40 feet of 18 inch Reinforced 
Concrete Piping. 

SIDEWALKS 

The Highway Department overlaid 5200 feet of sidewalk. The ongoing sidewalk 
projects include Evergreen Way and Spring Valley Road. 

BIKE RACKS 

This project was generously provided by the Boston Region MPO, The 
Massachusetts Department of Transportation, and the Federal Highway 
Administration. The Highway Department installed bike racks at the Medfield 
Public Library, Medfield Town Hall, The Center at Medfield, Pfaff Center, 
Wheelock Elementary School, Hinkley Swim Pond and the Medfield DPW 
Garage. 

FLOODING 

In March the Highway Department witnessed an over crest of 8.05 feet of water 
at the Charles River in Dover, leading to closing numerous streets in Medfield, 
including Noon Hill Road, Main Street, Causeway Street, Elm Street, North 
Street, Hartford Street and Orchard Street. 

SNOW 

Total snowfall for the year was 48 inches. The Public Works Department had a 
total of 20 snow related call outs. 

TRANSFER STATION 

The Medfield Highway Department trucked 3,208 tons of rubbish to the Millbury 
incinerator. Fluorescent bulbs continue to be collected at the Transfer Station. 
There is a shed in the recycling area for this purpose. 

17 



Approximately 30 tons of CRTs were collected at the Special Collection Days 
that were held in April and October. 

The Mercury Collection Program is ongoing at the Public Works Department at 
Town Hall. Residents are encouraged to drop off items containing mercury, e.g. 
thermometers and thermostats. 

Single Stream Recycling: 928 tons 

Automobile Batteries 2.2 tons 

Propane Tanks 78 tanks 

Christmas Trees l,925trees 

The Transfer Department/Solid Waste Committee continued with the Residential 
Sticker Program. The program was instituted to stop non-residential people from 
using the Medfield Transfer Station, the use by non-residents was costing 
resident's tax revenue. The program appears to be a success saving Medfield 
residents time and money. 

CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

The Cemetery Department continued its weekly maintenance of the grounds 
including mowing of grass, pruning of trees and bushes; slice seeding distressed 
areas, as well as the spring and fall cleanup of leaves. 

The Cemetery removed 10 trees from new and old sections and planted 20 new 
trees, 12 in the new section and 8 in the old section. Extensive pruning was done 
in both the old and the new section with the grubbing out of the hill behind the 
Medfield State Hospital Memorial and the hill on Route. 109 in the old section. 

A number of monuments in the old section were reset and cleaned courtesy of 
Vine Lake Preservation Trust and numerous volunteers under the guidance of 
Rob Gregg and a number of professionals in that field. 

A sculpting exhibit was on display from August to October which drew great 
interest from towns' people. 

In 2010, there were 56 interments including 16 cremation burials. Thirty-two 
burial plots were sold. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

The Medfield Water Department installed 28 new water services, replaced five 
hydrants, repaired five water service leaks and repaired 1 1 water main breaks. 
The Water Department completed a water main replacement project on Granite 
Street during August 2010. 



18 



The meter replacement program and conversion to radio read meter system is an 
ongoing project. In 2010, 194 new meters were installed. The radio read system 
increases the efficiency of the water billing process. Call the office to set up an 
appointment for meter replacement at 508-906-3004. 

The Town of Medfield pumped 487.5 million gallons of water in 2010. 

Flushing Program : The Water Department continues to flush the water system 
twice a year in an effort to ensure quality water. 



SEWER DEPARTMENT 

In 2010, the Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) treated 441,965,000 gallons 
of sewerage from homes and various businesses in town. The flow was treated 
and discharged to the Charles River, with better than 98% removal of impurities. 
239.53 dry tons of sludge was shipped to Woonsocket, Rhode Island, for 
incineration. 50,600 gallons of waste from resident septic systems was treated at 
the plant. 

During the year there were 1 1 call outs to the nine Pump Stations and the 
WWTP. Fifty-nine properties were connected to the sewer system in 2010. 

The large rain event during spring 2010 caused a WWTP water line break. 
FEMA reimbursement helped to lessen the cost of repairs. A WWTP permit 
renewal meeting took place in October with representatives of the Environmental 
Protection Agency and the MA Department of Environmental Protection. The 
permit was extended for another five years. In December, a new raw sewerage 
pump ($30,000) was installed and became operational. 



In conclusion, I wish to express appreciation to Administrative Assistant 
Maureen Anderson of the Water and Sewer Department and Donna Cimeno of 
the Department of Public Works. 

Appreciation is also given to Robert Kennedy, Street Department Foreman, 
Edward Hinkley, Water and Sewer Foreman, and Peter Iafolla, Chief Operator of 
the Wastewater Treatment Plant, as well as all the employees of the various 
departments who are to be commended for their continuous conscientious public 
service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kenneth P. Feeney 
Superintendent of Public Works 

19 



rm.n 











20 



BOARD OF WATER AND SEWERAGE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Town continued to respond to the water conservation signs keeping the 
consumption within the goals of the program. The Town has ample water 
pumping capacity with wells 1,2,3 and 6 available. 

As mentioned in previous reports, in December 2004 the State Department of 
Environmental Protection (DEP) issued a draft copy of restrictions to the 
pumping permits that need to be renewed every five years. If fully implemented, 
it would limit withdrawal of water to 65 gallons per person per household. 
Particularly, the pumping levels for Well 6, our most important and productive 
well were severely reduced. It has by far the largest capacity and excellent water 
quality. 

These new restrictions would significantly impact the quality of life and cost of 
living in our Town since the fixed costs for the water department would continue 
to be the same and reduced sales of water could drive up the costs to the 
consumer. 

Several reports and comments by consulting Hydrologists and the New England 
Water Works Association question the scientific justification of these restrictions. 
They disagree with wholesale withdrawal limit to solve the alleged stream flow 
reduction. Historical records show that even before Medfield started to pump 
significantly from the Charles River Aquifer, the river level fell during every 
summer. 

A final version of the DEP pumping permits was issued in January 2008. It 
follows the original restrictions outlined above. Together with our neighboring 
communities that also draw water from the Charles River Aquifer we 
implemented individual law suits challenging the new pumping regulations thus 
preventing the new regulations in its present form from taking effect until the law 
suits are decided. Attempts by the DEP to combine the suits failed in the 
Massachusetts Supreme Court. 

The latest attempt to implement the pumping limitations shifted to the political 
arena. The forces behind the pumping restrictions attempt to have the State 
Legislators pass a State Law to reach their goal. Petitions to the individual 
legislators by public and private individuals to prevent a vote are in process. 

The yearly update to the Storm Water Management Plan has been submitted, as 
required. 

21 



Repair of old sewer pipes continues on a yearly basis to further reduce the 
inflow infiltration of storm water into the sewer system. Due to past installation 
of sewer lines in various areas of the town, the subsurface is settling. This 
affected a number of adjacent cast iron water lines that developed leaks and 
needed to be repaired. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Marc Tishler, Chairman 
Jeremy Marsette 
Gary A. Lehmann 



22 



PLANNING BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In 2010, the Planning Board approved: 

• "North Street Pocket Neighborhood" Site Plan (a 2008 approval 
had lapsed) 

• Minor modifications to the Quarry Road and Erik Road 
subdivisions 

• Three Approval Not Required (ANR) under Subdivision Control 
Law plans creating three new lots and redefining lot lines 

The Planning Board, in conjunction with the Tree Warden, held one 
Scenic Road-Shade Tree hearing for property along Philip Street, and 
voted to allow the removal of 4 live trees and 2 dead trees in front of 67 
Philip Street for the purpose of constructing a new house. 



TOWN MEETING ACTION 

In Town Meeting action, the Board voted to recommend passage of a 
revised Personal Wireless Communication Zoning Bylaw. The purpose 
of the revision was to bring the Town into compliance with both 
changes in federal regulations regarding wireless communication as 
well as technological developments within the wireless communication 
industry that have occurred since the original Bylaw was passed in 
1998. Town Meeting approved the revised Bylaw. 

The Board recommended acceptance of streets within the North 
Meadows Estates subdivision. Baker Road and those portions of 
Richard Road and Brastow Drive located within the subdivision were 
accepted at Town Meeting. 



SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 

Under Section 13 of the Town of Medfield Zoning Bylaw the Sign 
Advisory Board reviews sign applications for their compliance with the 
Bylaw . The Advisory Board also assists applicants in understanding 
the Sign Bylaw and works with them to obtain results in keeping with 

23 



the character of the Town. In addition Sign Advisory Board members 
make recommendations to the Planning Board for changes in the 
Bylaw . The Board is comprised of both local business people and 
residents. In 2010 the Sign Advisory Board acted on 13 sign 
applications. 

The Planning Board would like to thank the Sign Advisory Board for 
all its diligent work. 



OTHER BUSINESS 

After seeking Requests for Proposals for on-call engineering services in 
2009, the Board, in 2010, interviewed four engineering firms. The 
Board voted to engage the services of B.E.T.A. Group, Inc., Consulting 
Engineers, from Norwood, Massachusetts, for the purpose of providing 
it with technical assistance and plan review. 

With the help of the B.E.T.A. Group, the Board reviewed buffer zone 
requirements as they relate to Site Plan Review. As a result of that 
work the Board will propose zoning changes at the 2011 Town 
Meeting. 

The Planning Board expresses its gratitude to the Radio Tower Study 
Committee for its endless hours of work in preparing the revised 
Personal Wireless Communication Bylaw for the Board. 

The Planning Board also acknowledges with thanks the cooperation and 
assistance of the Town Boards and Departments with special thanks to: 
Superintendent of Public Works Kenneth P. Feeney; Tree Warden 
Edward Hinkley; Town Counsel Mark G. Cerel; and Building 
Inspector/Zoning Enforcement Officer Walter Tortoricci. 

Planning Board meetings are generally held on Monday evenings at 
8:00 P.M. at the Town House. These meetings are open to the public. 
Appointments with the Board must be made by noon Thursday prior to 
the meeting. Requests for information or appointments should be 



24 



directed to the Planning Board Administrator, Norma Cronin, at the 
Town House, 508-359-8505, ext. 3027 or the direct line: 508-906-3027. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Keith R. Diggans, Chairman 
Wright C. Dickinson, Vice-Chairman 
Elissa G. Franco, Clerk 
George N. Lester, Member 
Stephen J. Browne, Member 




25 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During 2010 the Board of Appeals acted on fifteen applications as 
follows: 



GRANTED: 



Three Findings that proposed additions will not 

intensify the existing nonconformity or, in the 

alternative, will not be detrimental to the 

neighborhood 

One Special Permit to allow a family apartment 

One Special Permit for a restaurant 

One Special Permit to allow a dog rescue facility 

One Special Permit for children's fitness center 

One Special Permit for parking in the Downtown 

Business District 

One extension of a Special Permit and Variance for a 

single family home 

One Variance for the height of a church steeple 

Two requests to withdraw applications 



One request for a Special Permit and/or Variance for 

a sign 

One request for a variance for a Personal Wireless 

Facility 



The Board upheld the decision of the Zoning Enforcement Officer to 
deny a permit for a sign. 

The Board would also like to express its sincere thanks for all the 



DENIED: 



26 



support and consideration it has received this past year from the Town 
Boards and the residents of the Town of Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert F. Sylvia, Chairman 
Stephen M. Nolan, Member 
Russell J. Hallisey, Member 
Charles H. Peck, Associate 
Thomas M. Reis, Associate 
Douglas C. Boyer, Associate 




27 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



The Massachusetts Department of Revenue in November, 2010, approved the 
values set out in the Assessors' annual interim assessment report, resulting in a 
municipal tax rate of $15.02/$1,000 for fiscal year 2011. The town tax levy 
commitment, which is primarily the result of monies appropriated at Town 
Meeting, was $33,736,559, amounting to a $1,099,986, or 3.37% increase over 
last year's commitment of $32,636,573. Tax bills were timely mailed in 
December, 2010, for third quarter tax payments. Due to the soft real estate 
market, assessed values of single-family homes in Medfield decreased in value 
an average of 2.85% between January, 2009, and January, 2010. Overall total 
valuations for the town in fiscal year 2011 decreased to $2,246,109,150 from 
$2,293,201,839 in fiscal year 2010. 

As has been the case for decades, the Board of Selectmen adopted the Assessors' 
recommendation not to split the municipal tax rate; a so-called "split rate" would 
require that a proportionately larger share of the town's tax levy be paid by 
owners of commercial and industrial property. Since nearly 95% of Medfield's 
real estate tax base is residential, and only 4% is commercial or industrial, a split 
rate would result in minimal benefit to the homeowner as compared with a very 
substantial property tax increase to the business property owner. 

Taxpayers may access online via the town of Medfield website 
(town.medfield.net) fiscal year 2011 townwide property values, the Geographic 
Information System (GIS), other descriptive property information, and forms; 
the Board continues to update the Assessors' webpage from time to time. 

In March, 2010, R. Edward Beard was elected to another three-year term on the 
Board of Assessors. 

The Board wishes to thank Deputy Assessor Stan Bergeron for all of his hard 
work toward improving the breadth and quality of data entered into our Patriot 
software property assessment system, and also thanks Stan and his staff Donna 
O'Neill and Kathy Mills for pulling together the facts, figures, and 
documentation enabling the Assessing Department to fulfill its role as part of 



28 



Medfield's financial team. They together truly make it a pleasure to be a 
member of the Board of Assessors of Medfield. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Francis J. Perry, Chairman 

R. Edward Beard, Clerk 

Thomas V. Sweeney, Jr., Third Member 




29 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Personnel Board is comprised of three members appointed by the Town 
Moderator, the Chairman of the Board of Selectmen and the Chairman of the 
Warrant Committee. The term of office is for three years. The Board is 
responsible for maintaining and administering the Personnel Plan which 
establishes policies and procedures for employees of the Town, maintaining job 
descriptions, periodic review of the classification and pay schedule, and provides 
guidance on all hiring, transfers, promotions, terminations, and retirements. 
Kristine Trierweiler, Assistant Town Administrator provides staffing support to 
the Board. 

The Personnel Board met on a monthly basis throughout the year. Rachel Brown 
was appointed by the Committee to represent the Personnel Board at the 
Collective Bargaining sessions for both the Police and Fire Department Unions. 
An agreement was reached with the Police Department and a new contract will 
be in effect from 2010 to 2013. A Fire Department Union contract is in the final 
stages of negotiation and the Personnel Board hopes to include the settlement at 
the Annual Town Meeting in 201 1 . 

Ms. Brown continues to represent the Personnel Board on the Board of 
Selectmen's Insurance Advisory Committee. The Committee's role is to review 
various health care options available to the Town and make a recommendation to 
the Board of Selectmen. The goal of the committee is to recommend a quality 
health care option for employees and retirees at a reasonable cost. The Insurance 
Advisory Committee continues to work with the Massachusetts Interlocal 
Insurance Agency which offers a Blue Cross Blue Shield HMO and PPO to 
provide the highest quality care for our employees at a reasonable cost. 

The Personnel Board works with the Warrant Committee and the Board of 
Selectmen each year to recommend a cost of living increase to town employees. 
This cost of living increase is based on industry standards, salary compensation 
surveys, as well as the town's budget situation. The Board, in consultation with 
the Warrant Committee, has proposed a 0% cost of living increase for non-union 
employees for FY 2012 to reflect the local economy and the Town's fiscal 
position. (Police and Fire Contracts are currently being negotiated.) Some 
vacant positions at both the DPW and the Town Hall have been targeted to 
remain unfilled. Our employees have responded by shifting priorities, 
identifying further operational efficiencies, and assisting one another to meet 



30 



service needs. We would like to thank the employees for their dedication and 
service to the Town of Medfield and acknowledge that with ever decreasing 
budgets, we continue to look to them to maintain service and look for operational 
efficiencies. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Debra Shuman, Chairman 
Christine Connolly 
Rachel Brown 




31 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

1 hereby submit my annual report as Chief of the Medfield Police Department for 
the year ending December 31,2010. 

The year began with an unusually wet spring that resulted in flooding in many 
parts of Medfield that had not seen flooding to this extent in years. Route 109, 
specifically on the Millis side of the bridge, was flooded and closed for several 
days. This resulted in extensive traffic backups, especially during the commuting 
times, which was a very frustrating experience for everyone. Medfield officers 
assisted with traffic at various intersections at these times and did their best under 
very trying circumstances. 

The Medfield Highway Department was key to the success that we had handling 
the traffic. As water levels rose and fell and roads opened and closed, the 
Highway Department responded in short order and rearranged the detours for us. 

The need for residents to identify family members with various types of cognitive 
impairments became apparent in late winter when an extensive search, involving 
several public safety agencies, was conducted for a missing Alzheimer's patient. 
The search was successful but with less than an hour to spare due to the cold 
temperatures that night. There are many people, both young and old, who as a 
result of various medical issues develop a tendency to wander and are often able 
to cover large distances in a short period of time. Many devices and services are 
available to monitor and/or locate these individuals when loved ones have 
wandered away. Caregivers need to consider the use of these devices as one part 
of the solution to these issues. 

Officers James O'Neil and Eric Pellegrini attended specialized training with the 
Metropolitan Law Enforcement Council (Metro LEC) which will enable them to 
respond to challenging and difficult law enforcement situations. Their extensive 
training will also directly benefit Medfield when we encounter these situations 
locally. 

The heating system in the police station failed in early November. This resulted 
in a significant expense to replace the boiler. The emergency generator also 
failed during the year. Fortunately it occurred during its weekly test so that police 
operations were not affected. Significantly however, four days later the power 
went out for several hours and the generator was needed to keep emergency 
operations functioning. Other systems in the building are also beginning to fail 
and will need to be addressed in the near future. 

32 



I would like to take this opportunity to thank the members of the Medfield Police 
Department for their diligent attention to the variety of duties that they are 
requested to perform on a daily basis. Also, my thanks to the various Town 
Departments for the outstanding assistance and cooperation received over the 
past year. 

Respectfully Submitted 

Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 
Chief of Police 




33 



This is a summary of the 2010 calls that the Police Department 
handled: 

Aggravated Assault 5 

Arrests 64 

Arson 2 

Assists 302 

Breaking and Entering 23 

Counterfeiting/Forgery 12 

Credit card Fraud 7 

Disorderly Person 7 

Disturbances 89 

Drug Violations 29 

Extortion 1 

Homicides 

Impersonation 1 

Intimidation 3 

Juvenile Offenses 2 

Larceny 47 

Liquor Law violations 17 

Malicious Destructions 44 

Medical Assists 8 

Miscellaneous Complaints 407 

Mischief 44 

Missing persons 24 

Motor Vehicle crashes 288 

Motor Vehicle citations 9 1 6 

Operating Under Influence 14 

Parking Tickets 3 1 

Protective Custody 7 

Restraining Orders 39 

Robbery 2 

Runaway 1 

Shoplifting 4 

Simple Assault 29 

Suicide 1 

Threats 12 

Vandalism 53 



34 



MEDFIELD EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit the annual report for the Medfield Emergency Management 
Agency for the year ending December 31,2010. 

The Medfield Emergency Management Agency provides coordination between 

the 

Selectmen, Town Departments, the Massachusetts Emergency Management 

Agency 

and the Federal Emergency Management. 

The Medfield Emergency Management Agency is divided into two sections. One 
section, the Management Group contains amateur radio operators, a transport 
section and shelter management people. The second section contains the 
auxiliary police officers. Both groups are under the control of the Emergency 
Management Agency Director who reports to the Chief of Police on auxiliary 
police matters and the Town Administrator on emergency management issues. 

The management group maintains backup communications systems, provides 
transportation to and runs shelter operations in case of emergencies where people 
need temporary shelter due to power outages or other such storm damage. The 
auxiliary police unit provides additional manpower to the police department 
during emergencies and large events such as parades and other public gatherings. 
As in past years both groups combined to donate over 1,000 man-hours of 
community service to the Town. 

I would like to thank the men and women of the department for their continued 
support and contributions throughout the year. Also I wish to thank the Board of 
Selectmen, Michael Sullivan, his staff and the Medfield Police Department for 
their assistance and support. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Ray M. Burton Jr. 
Director 



35 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER / ANIMAL INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This report reflects my duties for the year ending December 3 1, 2010. 

TOTAL CALLS FOR 20 1 1 ,233 

TOTAL ANIMAL INCIDENTS FOR 20 1 672 

Calls for dogs running loose 140 

Barking dog complaints 22 

Pooper Scooper complaints 6 

Number of citations issued 64 

Calls for animals to be removed from residents' 
homes (includes squirrels, chipmunks, birds, 



opossums, and snakes) 


35 


Bats removed from residents' homes 


20 


Animals hit by cars in 2010 


157 


Dogs 


5 


Cats 


18 


Raccoons 


16 


Opossums 


22 


Skunks 


7 


Deer 


53 


Other (woodchucks, turkeys, rabbits, turtles) 


24 


Injured or sick animals that had to be euthanized by ACO 


27 


Raccoons 


16 


Skunks 


2 


Deer 


6 


Fisher cat 


2 



Calls related to squirrels, chipmunks and birds 35 

36 



Calls related to turtles 1 1 

Calls related to fisher cats 3 

Dog bites in 2010: 7 

Cat bites in 2010: 2 

Dogs abandoned in Medfield 4 

Medfield stray cats brought to the shelter 47 

Medfield stray rabbits brought to the shelter 4 

All barns and livestock have been inspected and pass the requirements of the 
Town of Medfield and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. All of the animals 
and barns are in the best of condition. 

The following animals were counted in Medfield in 2010: 

Beef cows 1 

Donkeys 1 

Llamas 1 

Goats 9 

Horses 101 

Ponies 2 

Poultry 196 

Sheep 23 

I appreciate the continuing support and cooperation of the Town of Medfield, the 
Medfield Police Department, Main Street Veterinary Hospital, Millis, Medfield 
Veterinary Clinic, and The Traveling Vet, Heather Cochran DVM of Medfield. 
Thank you to Assistant Animal Control Officers, Danielle Landry and Lori Sallee 
for always being available on the weekends to help animals in need. I want to 
acknowledge all of the Medfield Animal Shelter's dedicated volunteers that care 
for the animals every day. A big thank you to the Medfield residents for their 
ongoing donations and support of the animals at the Medfield Animal Shelter. 
Without all of you, we would not have been able to save the 322 cats, dogs, 
rabbits and other small animals that were adopted this year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Jennifer Shaw 
Animal Control Officer 
Animal Inspector 

37 



MEDFIELD 
FIRE - RESCUE 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Annual Report as Chief of the Fire Department for the 
year ending December 31,2010. 

Fire Department personnel responded to 1,285 calls for services in 2010, 
of which 589 were for Emergency Medical Services. The year started out 
with a challenging structure fire in one of our historic homes, the Tannery. 
What started out as a reported chimney fire, the fire on arrival was 
extending into the attic space. Personnel aggressively attacked the fire and 
were able to knock the fire down and save the structure. In February, Fire, 
Police and MetroLEC members were called to search for a missing person. 
Faced with adverse weather conditions and after an extensive search, 
personnel were successful in locating the missing person. In March the 
rains came. We responded to over 125 calls from residents to assist them 
with an array of water problems, which included pumping of flooded 
basements. The remainder of the year we remained busy with the day to 
day medical & fire calls. 

This year Firefighters Mike Harman & Neil Kingsbury completed the 12 
week Firefighter recruit class conducted at the Massachusetts Fire 
Academy. Training for department personnel has been conducted 
throughout the year. The MA Firefighting Academy conducted 
"Flashover" training which had personnel inside a training prop that had a 
fire burning so students could witness what it would be like to encounter 
and recognize the signs of a pending flashover in structure fire situations. 
Department members have also been trained on SafetyNet by LoJack. This 
is a locating system for people with cognitive disorders that have been 
issued a tracking device. Any resident wishing to know more about this 
valuable system are encouraged to contact the department for more 
information. 

The needs of the department have been well documented over the years. I 
realize that these needs are difficult to accomplish in these tough 
economic times. Increased staffing is inevitable, the ability to advance our 
level of EMS service to the paramedic level would benefit all residents 
and combined with the dwindling availability of on-call personnel, it is 

38 



something that will need to be looked at. A majority of our equipment is in 
good shape. Our oldest Brush Truck does need to be replaced. The chassis 
is thirty-seven years old and the body was transferred from a truck that 
was built in 1954. The issue we have with any replacement equipment is 
the space restrictions we face with the current fire station. Everything has 
to be built to limited lengths so it will fit. The Permanent Building 
Committee has looked at our situation and has identified there is a need to 
do something. There are funds being requested to further study the needs 
of a Public Safety Facility. I continue to search for Grant opportunities to 
aid the community in addressing some of our capital needs. 

Fire Inspections, evacuation drills and plan reviews have been conducted 
throughout the year. I would like to remind residents to check their smoke 
and carbon monoxide detectors for proper operation. It is recommended 
that detectors be replaced when they reach ten years old. 

I wish to thank all the members of the department for their continued 
dedication and commitment to making our community a safer place to 
live. 



Respectfully submitted, 

William A. Kingsbury 
Fire Chief 



39 



SERVICES RENDERED FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 2010 



AMBULANCE 








Total Calls 589 








Transports Metrowest Natick 


66 


Caritas Norwood 


235 


To: 








MetroWest 


6 


Newton Wellesley 


30 


Framingham 








Deaconess Glover 


70 


Beth Israel 


1 


Brigham & 


3 


Mass General 


2 


Women's 








Other 


3 






Advanced Life Support 








Departmental ALS: 


185 






ALS Intercepts: 


87 






Walpole 


22 


Westwood 44 




AMR 


21 






Other Services 








Medflight 1 








Details 2 








Cancelled/Refusals 








Well Being Checks 30 








Mutual Aid: 








Rendered 49 








Received 109 








FIRE DEPARTMENT 








Total Calls 




527 




Box 




118 




Still 




295 




Residential 




87 




Accidental/System Malfunction 




24 





40 



Services 




Ambulance Assist 


250 


Appliances 


5 


Brush and Grass 


12 


Burners Oil 


25 


Gas 


30 


Carbon Monoxide Alarms 


85 


Details 


5 


Dumpsters 


1 


Services (continued) 




Electrical 


175 


Fuel Spills 


5 


Gas 


25 


Leaks/Investigations 




Med-Flight 


1 


Fireworks 





Public Assistance 




Lock Outs 


29 


Pumping Cellars 


85 


Water Problems 


125 


Other 


65 


Inspections 




Blasting 


25 


Fire Prevention 


150 


Fuel Storage 


15 


New Residential 


14 


Smoke Detectors New 


14 


Resale 


154 


Oil Burners 


37 


Wood Stoves 


8 


U/Tank Removal 


5 


AST/Removal 


25 



Haz-Mat 


102 


Investigations 


272 


Motor Vehicles 


1 


Motor Vehicle 


83 


Accidents 




Mutual Aid Rendered 


9 


Received 


7 


Police Assist 


27 



Station Coverage 


5 


Structures 


10 


Storm Related 


88 


Searches 


2 


mits Issued 




Blasting 


1 


Bonfire 





Burning 


526 


Fuel Storage 


10 


Sprinkler Inst/Alt 


4 


Propane Storage 


14 


U/Tank Removal 


5 


Fire Alarm Inst. 


8 


Tank Truck 


17 



41 



INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 



The following is our annual report for the year ending December 31, 2010: 



Permits 



2009 2010 



Inspections 



2009 2010 



ncome ($) 



2009 



2010 



Expenses ($) 



2009 



2010 



Building 



333 



370 



1,430 



2013 



84,713 



93,010 



41,551 



53,405 



Plumbing/Gas 



329 



371 



328 



1,201 



14,655 



9,901 



5,758 



Wiring 



276 343 



505 



501 



25,270 29,270 16,256 15,394 



Total revenue from the issuance of permits and fees for inspections for the 
calendar year 2010 were $236,945 as compared to $213,144 in 2009. Expenses 
for 2010 were $74,558 as compared $67,708 in 2009. 



BUILDING INSPECTION 

A breakdown of building permits issued is listed below: 

New single family dwellings 

Multi family (Condo's) 

Complete partially finished single dwellings 

Additions to private dwellings 

Renovations to private dwellings 

Additions & renovations to business/industrial buildings 

New industrial/business buildings 

Family apartments 

Two Family apartments 

Shingling roof & installation of sidewalls 

Private swimming pools 

Accessory buildings 

Residential garages 

Demolition 

Tents (temporary) & construction trailers 

Signs 

Stoves (solid fuel burning/chimneys) 

New windows 

Solar System 

Towers 

Wireless 

Decks 



21 



30 
138 
2 




71 
9 
3 
3 

10 
7 

13 
7 

51 
3 
3 

3 

16 



42 



Foundations 7 

Total 396 

Occupancy certificates were issued for six new residences in 2010, as compared 
to five in 2009. 

Inspections for certification of business, schools, multi-family dwellings, nursing 
homes and pre-schools amounted to 24 inspections for 2010. 

Estimated construction costs on permits issued: 

2009 2010 

New dwellings $ 7,290,000 $4,823,500 

Renovations and additions, pools, 5,674,977 6,273,440 

shingling, sidewalls, etc. on residential 

New construction business and industry 



Renovations and additions business and 


8,350 


1,005,480 


industry 






Multi- family dwellings 








Two family dwellings 








Family apartments 









Whether you are planning to add a pool, a deck, re-shingle, apply siding or install 
replacement windows, most changes to your home require a building permit. 
These comprehensive building laws may seem cumbersome, but they are meant 
to benefit us all by monitoring the building and development activities in our 
community. Please, also remember that the placement of any type of structure, 
as simple as a tool shed (accessory building) on your property must adhere to the 
rules and regulations of the Medfield Zoning Bylaws, and in most cases a 
building permit is required. Before you proceed with any changes to your home 
or property, please call the Inspection Department at the Town Hall (359-8505, 
ext. 3005) and we will help you get started in the process of applying for a 
permit. 

Enforcement of the State Building Code (780 CMR - 7th Edition) continues to be 
the responsibility of the local building inspectors. Legislation effective 7/1/92 
requiring contractors to be registered with the Commonwealth became the 
responsibility of the Inspection Department staff to institute procedural changes 
for compliance. The office of the Inspection Department also keeps an accurate 
registration of builders holding State Construction Supervisor's licenses in order 
to assure compliance with Section 109.1.1 of the State Building Code. The 
building inspectors continue the enforcement to the code by making inspections 
of schools, churches and rest homes as well as other places of assembly on a 
periodic basis. 

43 



The Inspectors of Buildings also serve the town in the capacity of Enforcing 
Officers for Zoning and as such, made 4 inspections to investigate complaints 
and inquiries brought to their attention by residents as well as other town boards 
and departments. 

The assistance and cooperation of Fire Chief Kingsbury during inspections was 
greatly appreciated. The Fire Chief and the Inspectors continue to inspect smoke 
detectors in new construction and in additions and renovations as well as 
inspecting the installation of solid fuel burning appliances. Residents are 
reminded of the importance of having their wood stove installations inspected 
and certified in accordance with requirements of the Massachusetts State 
Building Code. 

Thank-you to Pat Iafolla-Walsh, Administrative and John Mahoney, Assistant 
Building Inspector. A special thanks again this year to Margaret Warren for her 
continued help in this office. 



PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTION 

The purpose of the position of the Plumbing and Gas Inspector is to administer, 
investigate and enforce the Uniform State Plumbing Code and State Fuel Gas 
Code. Homeowners cannot be issued plumbing or gas permits. Permits can only 
be issued to a licensed Journeyman or a Master Plumber. Plumbing or gas 
cannot be installed, altered, removed, replaced, or repaired until the Inspector of 
Plumbing or Gas has issued a permit. The Inspection Department will be glad to 
help you make the determination concerning the need for plumbing and gas 
permits. When a citizen of the town requests the plumber or gas fitter to apply 
for a permit, he is getting the assurance that the installation will not only be 
installed correctly and safely, but also that the work will be installed by a 
professional and not exploited by non professionals. It is definitely in the 
homeowner's interest to insist on inspections by qualified town inspectors 
knowledgeable in their trade. It is money well spent. 

The Plumbing Code is constantly being changed and upgraded to try to give the 
consumer and the plumber a direction that will assure a safe installation. Of great 
concern lately is the installation of backflow prevention devices, where 
necessary, to insure the continuance of the good clean potable water of which we 
are very proud in Medfield. 

WIRING INSPECTION 

The Wiring Inspector continues to enforce the Massachusetts Electric Code as 
well as the National Electric Code in his inspections of wiring installations for 
which permits are issued. Residents are reminded that the permitting process is 
in effect to assure safe and correct installations. 

44 



Thank you this year to Peter Diamond, and William McCarthy, Assistant 
Electrical Inspectors 



Respectfully submitted, 



Walter Tortorici, Inspector of Buildings 
James Leonard, Inspector of Wires 
John A. Rose Jr., Plumbing Inspector 
Peter Navis, Gas Inspector 



45 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is the Annual Report for the Sealer of Weights and Measures for 
the calendar year ending December 31, 2010. 

Measuring devices tested and sealed as required by Massachusetts law: 

Weighing scales and balances 39 

Weights 23 

Liquid measuring meters (In gasoline pumps) 87 

Linear measures (Yardsticks and tape measures) 2 

Bottle refund machines 3 

Scanning system tests 3 

Other inspections and tests (packaged grocery items, etc. for 74 
weight and marking. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Michael J. Clancy 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 



46 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Conservation Commission is pleased to submit its annual report for 2010. 

The Conservation Commission administers the Massachusetts Wetlands 
Protection Act, M.G.L. Chapter 131, Section 40, the Department of 
Environmental Protection's Stormwater Management Policy and the Medfield 
Wetlands Bylaw, Article IX. These laws protect the wetlands and waterways of 
Medfield. The functions of these laws are: 

• to safeguard public surface and groundwater supplies 

• to prevent damage from flooding by preserving town resource areas. 

The resources area are floodplains, swamps and bogs, streams, ponds and other 
water bodies, and certain types of land adjoining them. Under the Medfield 
Wetlands Bylaw, vernal pools and a 50-foot no-disturb buffer area are protected 
resource areas. Anyone proposing to alter a resource area or land subject to 
flooding, or to perform work within 100 feet of a wetlands or bank, or within 200 
feet of a river or perennial stream must file for a permit with the Conservation 
Commission. Anyone wishing to work within these protected areas must satisfy 
the Commission that the proposed work will not significantly harm the resources. 

The Town benefits from the wetlands protection laws and their associated 
regulations by protecting Medfield's wetlands from pollution, nutrient 
overloading and encroachment. The wetlands laws provide guidance and 
consistency to applicants with regards to the rules and regulations for various 
construction projects. The Commission's preeminent concern is to ensure that 
the eight interests of the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act and the 
Medfield Wetlands Bylaw are upheld. The eight important public interests or 
values are: 

protection of public and private water supply, 

protection of groundwater supply, 

flood control, 

storm damage prevention, 

prevention of pollution, 

protection of land containing shellfish, 

protection of fisheries and 

protection of wildlife habitat 

as they relate to the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act and the Medfield 

47 



Wetlands Bylaw. 

In 2010, the Commission held 22 public meetings for the purpose of: 15 Requests 
for Determinations of Applicability, 1 1 Notices of Intent and 1 violation. During 
2010 26 project approval permits were issued and one project denial. No fines 
were issued. 

The Massachusetts Department of Capital Asset Management (DCAM) began 
work at the former Medfield Hospital site in 2010. The redevelopment of the 
area is a major project for the town. DCAM filed several permit applications for 
design and work purposes for areas within the Commission's jurisdictional 
authority. The Commission continues to monitor the ongoing work at the former 
hospital site. Commissioner Deborah Bero represents the Commission on the 
State Hospital Environmental Review Committee. 

In addition to the regulatory responsibilities of wetlands protection, the 
Commission is charged by the Conservation Commission Act to actively protect 
the watershed resources of the town and to promote and develop natural 
resources of the town. The Commission actively pursues the acquisition of land 
for conservation and passive recreation use. The Commission continues to study 
the agricultural use of certain areas of conservation land for farming. 

The economic downturn continues to challenge the Commission as it affects the 
management of land under the Commission's authority. For the second year, the 
Conservation Commission provided an abbreviated pond management program 
for Meetinghouse, Cemetery, Danielson Pond, Flynn's Pond and Kingsbury 
Pond. The Commission removed the pond management item from its operating 
budget for FY 2010. Commissioner Robert Kennedy represents the Commission 
on the Clean Pond Study Committee. 

The Commission does oversee many youth oriented projects. For 2010, the 
Commission reviewed and guided four Eagle Scout projects and the completion 
of one Girl Scout project during 2010. As part of the Eagle Scout projects, three 
footbridges were installed over wet areas of established trails and an 
identification sign was added to the entrance to the Danielson Pond Conservation 
area. The Gold Award Girl Scout project marked two trail systems through the 
Cronin Open Space land and provided an identification sign with a kiosk for the 
area. Montrose School senior high school women completed community service 
by maintaining the formal garden entrance at Danielson Pond. 

The Commission through appointments made by the Board of Selectmen 
established an Open Space and Recreation Planning Committee (OSRPC). The 
purpose of the OSRPC is to review and revise the town's Open Space and 
Recreation Plan so as to meet and express the current thinking of the people of 
Medfield. The committee assesses the open space and recreational needs of the 

48 



town in light of current growth and trends. The members of the OSRPC are 
Chairman Robert Aigler, Conservation Commissioner, Toby Burrell, Park and 
Recreation Commissioner, Thomas Caragliano, member-at-large, David 
Lafreniere, Friends of Medfield's Forest and Trails member and Michael Perloff, 
Conservation Commissioner. They have met on a monthly basis since January 
2010. The committee conducted interviews with various town boards, 
commissions and civic organizations regarding open space and recreation in 
Medfield. In order to assess the ideas and concerns of the citizens, the OSRPC is 
developing a survey for Medfield's citizens to complete regarding open space 
and recreation in town. 

The Conservation Commission welcomed the appointment of Bradford Garnett 
as a member of the commission. Mr. Garnett brought great enthusiasm to the 
commission. Due to professional commitments, Mr. Garnett' s term on the 
Commission was brief as he resigned the position after serving a few months. 
The Commission thanks Mr. Garnett for his volunteer service to the town 
through his participation on the Commission. 

Members of the Commission attended two educational conferences during 2010 
sponsored by the Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions. 
They conducted two in-house workshops, Stormwater Management and 
Mosquito Control, in 2010. Commissioner Robert Aigler received his 
Fundamentals for Conservation Commissioners Certificate. 

The Commission meets on the first and third Thursdays of each month. The 
Conservation Commission is a seven-member commission. Commissioners are 
appointed by the Board of Selectmen. Anyone interested in serving on the 
Commission as a member or an associate should send a letter of interest and 
resume to the Board of Selectmen and a copy to the Conservation Commission. 

The Conservation Office is located on the second floor of Town Hall, Room 209 
and is open on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. For an appointment 
regarding conservation and /or wetlands matters, call the Conservation office. 
508 906-3028. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ralph A. Parmigiane, Chairman 
Michael Perloff, Vice-Chairman 
Robert Aigler 
Deborah J. Bero 
Philip J. Bun- 
Robert E. Kennedy 



49 



MEDFIELD ENERGY COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and residents of Medfield: 

Every year Medfield spends over $1.2 million in energy for its 13 town-owned 
buildings or about $95 per Medfield resident. One goal of the Medfield Energy 
Committee (MEC) when it was formed in 2008 was to reduce the Town's energy 
use by 20%. 

Since then, the Town has been made impressive strides in reducing its energy 
consumption. MEC, together with several key town departments including 
public works and the schools, have worked to find ways to operate our municipal 
buildings more efficiently. Medfield has received incentives and rebates from 
NSTAR and Columbia Gas of Massachusetts for energy-savings projects ranging 
from town well upgrades to the installation of variable speed motors on pumps 
and more efficient lighting, C02 sensors and ventilation equipment in town 
buildings. The electricity savings alone for projects identified and implemented 
in the last 3 years will be 726,737 kWh, which is an annual dollar savings of 
$120,000 or an 11.6% decrease in electricity costs. The town applied for and 
received $177,056 in NSTAR incentives to help pay for improvements. At the 
same time, Medfield has taken advantage of $65,597 in incentives from 
Columbia Gas (formerly Baystate Gas) which has led to a savings of $38,000 for 
projects completed in 2009 in the middle and high schools. 

This year the MEC has been exploring becoming a Massachusetts Green 
Community under the state's Green Communities Act. The Town applied for 
and received a planning assistance grant by the MA Department of Energy 
Resources (DOER) in May 2010 to help develop strategies to meet the five 
Green Community criteria which are: 1) as-of-right siting and 2) expedited 
permitting for renewable and alternative energy generating, R&D and/or 
manufacturing facilities, 3) an energy-efficient town vehicles purchasing policy, 
4) an Energy Reduction Plan to reduce energy by 20% over 5 years and 5) 
adoption of the "stretch code" , an optional appendix of energy efficiency 
measures to the Massachusetts Builidng Code 780 CMR. The MEC hosted a 
public forum in October to educate residents and town boards on the stretch code. 

Passing the stretch code will lower energy costs and greenhouse gas emissions 
from newly built homes and commercial buildings in Medfield for the life of the 
building. Amending the zoning bylaw to encourage alternative and renewable 
energy R&D and manufacturing would signal to developers that the Town is 
interested in having clean energy technologies consider locating in Medfield's 
industrial zone. 



50 



A Green Communities designation would also make more state funds available 
for use in Medfield buildings for energy efficiency and renewable energy 
measures that would save the taxpayer money for the life of the buildings. 
Massachusetts towns have received between $100,000 and $900,000 in grants 
last year. This pot of money of about $8 million per year comes from the 
Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative RGGI. There are, 53 towns and cities have 
been designated Green Communities in the Commonwealth and 66 communities 
have adopted the stretch code. 

We encourage you to become informed on these green community initiatives 
prior to Town Meeting. In the upcoming year, we plan to continue our efforts to 
look for ways to reduce the carbon footprint of our municipal and commercial 
buildings as well as in our homes. 

The MEC meets monthly usually every third Tuesday in Town Hall. The public 
is invited to attend the meetings, participate in MEC activities and offer 
suggestions on how the Town can best meet the challenges of reducing energy 
consumption and minimizing its environmental impact. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Marie Nolan, Chair 

Lee Alinsky 

Fred Bunger, MCAN liaison 

Penni Conner 

Fred Davis 

Cynthia Greene 

Maureen Howells, Medfield Green liaison 

Charles Kellner, School Dept, ex officio 

James Redden 

Osier Peterson, Selectman, ex officio 

Emre Schveighoffer 

Mike Sullivan, Town Administrator, ex officio 



51 



MEDFIELD HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Historical Commission is appointed by the Board of Selectmen. 
Our job is to identify and protect Medfield's historical and archaeological assets. 
We make sure historic preservation is considered in community planning and 
development decisions. The commission has an annual budget of some $2,000, 
and it has certain statutory authority. Its monthly meetings in the Town House 
are open to the public. 

We work proactively to preserve those qualities of the town that residents say 
they want, which helps preserve property values. We walk the narrow, fuzzy line 
between historic preservation and respecting property owners' rights. Owners 
tend to favor historic preservation in principle... so long as it doesn't affect their 
bottom line when they want to demolish an antique to make room for a 
McMansion, which they believe will have greater market appeal. 

A Big Win, thanks to the Demolition Delay Bylaw! 

Medfield was one of the first Massachusetts communities with a demolition 
delay bylaw, and ours is one of the most stringent. It prevents historically 
significant buildings - non-renewable resources » from being demolished before 
serious efforts have been made to rehabilitate or restore. The bylaw URL is 
http://www.town.medfield.net/Bylaws.pdf 

When an application is filed to demolish a building over 50 years old, the 
commission investigates and holds hearings on those that may be historically 
significant. If a building is then declared "preferably preserved," its demolition 
may delayed for up to a year. The commission always seeks win-win solutions - 
such as rehab and adaptive reuse of at least part of the building ~ that serve the 
interests of both the property owner and historic preservation. We define lose- 
lose as when the owner refuses to negotiate and instead simply waits us out for 
the full year and then demolishes the structure. 

The commission reviewed six demolition applications last year on properties at 
25 Adams, 23 Farm, 19 Summer (twice), 154 Main, 6 Earl Kerr, and 100 Green. 

By far the most significant was the house at 25 Adams Street, the birthplace of 
Lowell Mason, Medfield' s most famous and accomplished native son and 
generator of over 100,000 Google hits. When a developer applied for a 
demolition permit so he could build a two-family house on the site, over 50 
people came to our hearing March 3 to protest. 

52 



Because of the importance of Lowell Mason, the commission delayed the 
demolition for a year. This one-year break allowed time for the grass-roots 
Lowell Mason Foundation to form and raise money to stabilize the house and 
move it to a town-owned site next to the swim pond on Green Street. Without the 
demolition delay bylaw, the house would have been one more bulldozed historic 
structure. In addition to Bob Luttman and Karen Scotti and the rest of the Lowell 
Mason Foundation board, we also thank the owner and developer for their 
support and cooperation with the preservation effort. 

At 23 Farm Street, the owners elected to preserve and incorporate the 19 th 
century farmhouse as a guest house attached to the new house. At 19 Summer 
Street, the first would-be builder stomped out on the commission in the middle of 
the hearing; the second agreed to build a house that he could make a profit 
on. . .and still respect the streetscape and neighborhood. 

The other three demolition applications were approved. 

Like all historical commissions, the Medfield Historical Commission is 
continually exploring ways to deal more effectively with "demolition by neglect" 
issues - situations in which an owner neglects and or abuses an historic structure 
for years, then pleads that the place is beyond repair and must, for safety and 
economic reasons, be torn down. 

Certified Local Government 

Thanks to its CLG (Certified Local Government - and we have to reapply every 
year) status, Medfield has received many survey and planning grants from the 
state and federal governments in recent years. The Massachusetts Historical 
Commission continues to encourage us to apply because they believe we put the 
money to good use. 

For our survey and planning work, our demolition delay activism. MAAC. and 
other activities, the Massachusetts Historical Commission has long pointed to 
Medfield as a model for other historical commissions. 

Medfield Archaeological Advisory Committee (MAAC) 

The Medfield Archaeology Advisory Committee was formed in 1993 as a 
subcommittee of the Medfield Historical Commission. It was formed to help 
protect archaeologically-sensitive areas in town. MAAC members are John A. 
Thompson, Chairman; Debbie Gaines; C. B. Doub; Jackie Wile: and Cheryl 
O'Malley. New member Mark Agostini joined the group in 2010. 

On an ongoing basis, the committee maintains and updates a map of the 
archaeologically-sensitive areas, helps protect the sites, evaluates and registers 
artifacts, and provides educational services. 

53 



In 20 1 0, M AAC was approved by the Friends of the Dwight Derby House to 
create a lab and work space on the second floor. This space is nearly completed. 
MAAC also initiated renewed consideration of a potential bylaw amendment; if 
adopted by a future town meeting, it would strengthen the protection for 
Medfield's archaeological resources. The Massachusetts Historical Commission 
finished their review and MAAC will consider the new bylaw with the Medfield 
Historic Commission. 

MAAC welcomes inquiries from anyone who thinks a property in Medfield is 
threatened or finds an artifact that they would like to bring to the attention of the 
committee; please contact John A. Thompson or any other member. 

Mike Standley 

Burgess P. Standley served the historical commission in the 1970s and came 
back in the early 1990s to serve almost 20 more years. In 2010 Mike resigned as 
a full voting member but remains as an associate member. Mike and Caroline 
Standley have lived in Medfield almost 60 years. During that time, through their 
participation on countless boards and ad hoc project committees, they have had 
an unparalleled positive impact on the quality of life in their adopted home town, 
for which we thank them profusely. 

Want to join our commission? 

Vacancies occur on the historical commission from time to time. If you're 
interested in Medfield's history, call any of the members, or show up at one of 
our monthly public meetings, and let's get to know each other. You could start 
as an associate member and become a full member if someone resigns. 



Respectfully submitted, 

David Temple, Co-chair 
Daniel Bibel, Co-chair 
Maria Baler 
Sarah Murphy 
Charles Navratil 
Ancelin Wolfe 



54 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

OVERVIEW 

The Historic District Commission administers the Town's four Historic Districts: 

• The John Metcalf Historic District established in 1989 on West Main Street, 
enlarged in 1996 and in 2004. 

• The Hospital Farm Historic District established in 1994. 

• The Clark-Kingsbury Farm Historic District established in 1997. 

• The Medfield Town Center Historic District established in 2000 

PURPOSE AND SCOPE OF THE HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 

Authority to create Historic Districts and the accompanying governing body is 
granted under the Historic District Act of 1960, Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40C. The purpose of the law is threefold: 

• to preserve and protect the distinctive characteristics of buildings and places 
significant in the history of the Commonwealth and its cities and towns 

• to maintain and improve the settings of those buildings and places 

• to encourage new designs compatible with existing buildings in the district 

Under Chapter 40C, communities can create Local Historic Districts to protect 
the character of historic areas. Town-appointed Local Historic Commissions 
govern such districts. Since each property owner within a district contributes to 
the overall historic character, changes proposed for the exterior of any property, 
as well as new construction, are considered in light of the impact they may have 
on the district as a whole. Before a property owner within a district is allowed to 
change an exterior architectural feature of a building, the owner must receive 
approval from the Local Historic Commission. Approval is in the form of a 
certificate of appropriateness, hardship or non-applicability with respect to such 
construction or alteration. 

There are now Local Historic Districts in over one hundred Massachusetts towns 
and cities. Historic Districts do not prevent changes from occurring, nor do they 
prevent new construction. The intent of any Local Historic District is not to halt 
growth, but to allow for thoughtful consideration of change, to allow changes and 
additions that are harmonious, and prevent the intrusion of incongruous elements 
that might distract from the aesthetic and historic values of the district. Local 
Historic District Commissions have authority only over the portion of the 
exterior of a building that can be seen from a public street, way or park. The 

55 



Commission's Guidelines for Changes within Medfield Local Historic Districts 
is available upon request. 

HISTORIC DISTRICTS IN MEDFIELD 

Medfield passed "Historic Districts' 1 , Article 14 of the bylaws, and created the 
John Metcalf Historic District through a vote of the 1989 annual Town Meeting. 
This first district included for historic houses on west Main Street and included 
the oldest portion of Vine Lake Cemetery. Through a vote of the annual Town 
Meeting in 1996, the John Metcalf Historic District was enlarged to include a 
total of sixteen historic buildings. 

The Town established a second historic district, The Hospital Farm Historic 
District, in 1994. It includes 33 buildings at the Medfield State Hospital, and the 
surrounding historic landscape. The buildings were built at the turn of this 
century, mostly in the Queen Anne Revival style, and are grouped around a large 
quadrangle, resembling the campus of a small college. 

In 1997, the Clark- Kingsbury Farm Historic District, Medfield's third district, 
was established. It provides protection to the historic and unique grouping of the 
18 th century Clark-Kingsbury farmhouse, outbuildings and pond with gristmill 
that forms a widely appreciated and essential part of the rural character of 
Medfield. 

In April of 2000, the Medfield Town Center Historic District was created by 
unanimous vote of Town Meeting. This proposed district is intended to preserve 
and protect the character of the Center of the town of Medfield. 

The Town Center of Medfield is important for its mix of civic, commercial, and 
residential properties. Each category has an integral function in the town and 
over the years as the town has developed, each building, in its own unique way, 
has been significant in the developing character of the Town Center. While the 
other historic districts in Medfield are primarily residential, an unusual aspect of 
this proposed historic district is the concentration of civic and commercial 
buildings in addition to its residential ones. Historically, where the civic 
buildings provided the center of town government, education, religious and social 
activity, the industrial and commercial buildings served as the hub of Medfield's 
active and developing economy. 



ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND PLANS 

The Commission has revised its Guidelines for Changes within Medfield Local 
Historic Districts. It is more user friendly and address the needs of those 
homeowners with non-historic properties within the four Historic Districts in 
Medfield 



56 



The Commission has been actively working with the Board of Selectmen, 

DCAM and the Massachusetts Historical Commission to preserve the 

historically significant buildings and landscapes that make up the former 

Medfield State Hospital site. 

We are always interested in assisting residents in the creation of new historic 

districts for their neighborhoods and always looking for volunteers to help 

with our efforts. 

One of our longtime Commission members, Mike Standley, retired after 

many years of dedicated service. We are seeking new members to round out 

our ranks. 



Respectfully submitted, 



David Sharff, Chair 
Barbara Jacobs 
Connie Sweeney 
Michael Taylor 




57 



Keepers of the Town Clock 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Another year passes and the historic Town Clock housed in the steeple of 
Medfield's original Meetinghouse continues to do its job. We can't say the clock 
is still ticking because since the 1960's it has run on an electric motor. The 
frame of the old works dating back to mid 1800's is still the foundation of the 
clock mechanism. Gears in various parts of the clockworks have been upgraded 
several times throughout its life. 

In 2010 nothing of great significance happened with the clock. Members of the 
public again had an opportunity to tour the Meetinghouse steeple and witness the 
town's timepiece. For the first time in several years, one of the intense winter 
storms brought icing that froze the hands on the north face and knocked the four 
clock faces out of whack. This is as close as it comes to a "clock emergency." 

A close look at the many abandoned clock parts in the Meetinghouse reveals that 
at one time the Town Clock tolled each hour. A wooden shaft connected the 
clock to a strike in the belfry two stories above it. The bell, cast in 1868 by 
Holbrook and Sons in East Medway, had for a time in Medfield' s past counted 
each passing hour. 

Would there be any objection to restoring the hourly ring of a real bell in the 
town center? In conversation with the proprietor of Medfield' s Electric Time 
Corporation, Mr. Tom Erb, the idea of reactivating the hourly strike originally 
came up. Mr. Erb generously offered to support such an effort with materials and 
knowhow. The entire project can be accomplished without taxpayer dollars. 
Before considering the project further, we would seek the input of the Selectmen 
and Townspeople. 



Respectfully submitted, 

David Maxson 

Marc Tishler 

Co-keepers of the Town Clock 



58 



Memorial Public Library 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Residents of Medfield 

It is with great pleasure that I submit the 2010 annual report. 

The Medfield Memorial Public Library is a gathering place that brings our 
community together, a 21 st century meeting house. Our mission is to educate and 
entertain people of all ages by connecting them to information and offering 
cultural opportunities. We strive to provide welcoming, convenient and 
responsive personal service. 

Library Budget: We operated on a tight budget with reduced staffing, but were 
able to maintain compliance with the Minimum Standards for Free Public 
Library Service in Massachusetts. 

We adjusted the time the Library opened to 10:30 am Monday through Saturday 
for consistency; and opened Sunday afternoons during the school year to 
accommodate students and working parents, Tuesday and Thursday evenings 
from 6 to 9 pm to support community groups and additional evening hours for 
students during exam periods. 

Technology: Two self-check workstations were installed to facilitate 
independent borrowing and decrease wait times. Also, we installed online 
software for museum pass and room reservations and program registration for at 
home convenience. Both the hardware and software was donated by The Friends 
of the Library. 

Cutting edge, thin client computing, built on open source software, and color 
printing and photocopying were installed for public use in the Library. 

Building and Grounds: The lower level stacks were reconfigured for better 
illumination, improved organization of library materials, and creation of spaces 
for teens to gather for recreational, social and educational activities. 

The original rooms of the library were restored to their former beauty and gallery 
space was created. The Periodical Room's floor was replaced; shelves were 
added; and walls were painted. The Dailey Reference Room computers were 
relocated; shelving was removed; the walls were repainted; and a donated baby 
grand piano was added. 

The Children's Room stacks were reconfigured for better sightlines and working 
spaces; carpeting was replaced for improved safety and comfort; and the 
collections were weeded and refreshed to improve appeal. 

59 



Personnel: We bade farewell and gave our best wishes to Tara Anderson, 
Corinne Coveney, Amy Lang and John Shewfelt and welcomed to Veronique 
Chechile, Matt Costanza, and Kimberly Tolson to the Library staff. 

Communications: The Library completed a branding process, began publishing 
a monthly, now bimonthly, newsletter, issued weekly press releases to the local 
media outlets and redesigned the web site to improve virtual access to services. 

Collections and Services: The Library had 8,739 registered borrowers, of 
whom 7,818 were Medfield residents. We circulated directly 213,178 items and 
loaned through other libraries 34,091 items. 

We were the first library in the Minuteman Library Network to allow borrowers 
direct access to materials held for them. 

The Playaway audio book collection was expanded and OverDrive downloadable 
audio book and Speed Read collections were added with funds given by The 
Library Trust Fund. 

Professional Reference Service was available in person, by telephone and online 
through chat programs during the open hours of the Library and remote access to 
Library resources was available 24/7. 

Programs: Many engaging thought provoking programs were funded by the 
Friends of the Library: 246 Children's programs for 3,647 attendees; 37 Teen 
programs for 419 attendees; andl6 Adult programs for 217 attendees. 

We developed collaborative working relationships with the Neponset Valley 
Chamber of Commerce, the Massachusetts Small Business Development Center 
Network, The One-Stop Career Center in Norwood, the Medfield Job 
Networking Group, and the Medfield Professionals Linkedln Group to provide 
support to job seekers, entrepreneurs and local businesses as part of a federally 
funded LSTA project: Libraries for Job Seekers. 

The Library partnered with several local organizations: Medfield Historical 
Society, Zullo Gallery, the Medfield Youth Community Collaborative and 
Community Connections. 

The Friends of the Library: With 527 members, the Friends support and 
enhance all of the library's services and programs. They donated the software 
and hardware for the two self-check stations, most of the museum passes, funds 
for all of the programs including summer reading and the library gala, movie 
licenses, new book trucks, an exhibitor booth at the tri-chamber of commerce 
event, a large screen television, Wii gaming software and equipment, AV 

60 



production equipment, and online reservation software for museum passes, 
rooms and program spaces. 

The Library Trust Fund: Supported the library's new collections of Playway 
audio books, OverDrive downloadable audio books and Speed Reads. 

Thanks: We appreciate the support of 205 dedicated volunteers who expanded 
the capacity of the library staff. Thanks to those who served as Trustees, Steve 
Pelosi, Chair and Friends of the Library, Kathy Brennan, President, and on The 
Library Trust Fund Board, Tim Borchers, Chair. Also, thank you to the many 
people of all ages who gave approximately 2,279 hours of their time and talents 
for fundraising, collection management, programming and reconfiguration of the 
shelving. We are especially grateful to our long-time volunteer, Mildred Willis, 
who died in October. 

We are thankful for the financial generosity of many individuals, especially 
Catherine Bell, the Friends of Library, and The Library Trust Fund. Finally, 
thanks to the people of Medfield who support the library with their tax dollars to 
keep the Library certified, staffed with professionals, open seven days a week, 
filled with new and relevant materials, and free to all. We hope our services, 
collections and programs have helped you weather this economic recession and 
added value and enjoyment to your lives. We appreciate your support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Deborah Kelsey 
Library Director 



61 



Trustees of Memorial Public Library 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

2010 saw the Medfield Memorial Public Library staff continue their efforts to 
update technology and refine procedures to better serve the residents of Medfield. 
The library opening time was moved to 10:30 am Monday - Saturday, with 
Sunday hours and staggered evening hours to accommodate the needs of a 
diverse set of patrons. Self check workstations were installed to streamline the 
check-out process which helped to free staff so they could assist patrons 
throughout the library. Considerable effort was put into reconfiguring the lower 
level stacks as well as the Children's Room stacks on the second floor. Finally, 
much needed renovations were made to the Daily Reference Room and the 
Periodicals Room. 

During the year we bade farewell to staff members Tara Anderson, Corinne 
Coveney, Amy Lang and John Shewfelt, and welcomed Veronique Chechile, 
Matt Costanza, and Kimberly Tolson to the library staff. 

The Trustees thank Library Director Deborah Kelsey and her staff for managing 
these challenging and disruptive changes in an efficient and positive manner. 
The Trustees would also like to acknowledge the Friends of the Library for their 
generous support of many library initiatives, the Library Trust Fund, and the 
many volunteers who donate countless hours to help make our library the 
valuable resource that it is. 

Finally, we thank the citizens of Medfield for their use and support of the 
Medfield Memorial Public Library. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Steven Pelosi, Chair 
John Bankert 
Robert Luttman 
Maura McNicholas 
Isobel Palson 
James Whalen 



62 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEMORIALS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Committee to Study Memorials is pleased to submit its twenty-first 
Annual Report. 

This was a very sad year for the Committee with the death of long-time 
member G. Marshall Chick. Marshall joined the Committee in the year 
2000, as the newly appointed Veterans' Agent. He was an active member 
of our Committee who served as chairman, overseeing the growth of 
Baxter Park, including the addition of the Vietnam and Korean Memorials. 
In addition he was instrumental in the installation of the service flagpoles 
that were installed when the new WWI Flagpole was built following its 
destruction after it was hit by lighting. During Veterans' Day ceremonies, 
2010 at Baxter Park, a memorial tree was planted in the park in his honor 
and memory. His quick wit and tireless energy on behalf of the Town will 
be sorely missed. 

The Committee continues to work with the Park and Recreation 
Commission in the planning and upkeep of the park. The American flag, 
commonwealth, town and service flags all fly 365 days a year over the 
park. They are replaced each Memorial Day and Veterans' Day and are 
paid for through donations. There is still one service flagpole (Merchant 
Marines) available for dedication for $1,000.00, as well as four park 
benches at the cost of $2,500.00 per bench. Both come with memorial 
plaques noting for all time the individual so honored. 

In addition to its efforts at Baxter Park, the Committee is also responsible 
for recommending names for new town streets and establishing and 
maintaining honor squares for those killed in our nation's wars. 

We thank the residents of Medfield, the Public Works Department and the 



63 



Park and Recreation Commission for their continued support. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Richard DeSorgher 
Frank Iafolla 
Jane Lomax 
David Temple 




64 



VETERANS' SERVICE OFFICER 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This is my first report as Veterans' Service Officer for the Town of 
Medfield having been appointed in September of 2010. It is my full 
intention to deliver services to area veterans with a similar dedication of 
purpose as demonstrated by my predecessor, G. Marshall Chick. In my 
short time in this position it has become very clear that his contributions 
for these past eleven years are warmly missed. 

According to the 2010 census, Medfield is blessed with a population of 
517 veterans. Most of these veterans are represented in our senior 
population recording service during WWII, Korea, Vietnam and the brief 
periods of peacetime before and after the Korean conflict. Much of this 
population of senior veterans live on fixed incomes in a time when the 
cost of living is increasing dramatically. Many of these veterans are now 
looking into any available veteran benefit that may help relieve their rising 
expenses of daily living. 

Many of these benefits are provided through the Veterans Administration. 
This federal agency requires strict application compliance for veterans 
seeking benefits. In providing benefit explanation and application 
assistance this office is able to assist veterans and their widows in 
obtaining or increasing eligible VA benefits. 

Recently the Veterans Administration announced higher accountability to 
those veterans who served in Vietnam. Agent Orange and its sister 
rainbow defoliants were used excessively throughout Vietnam to control 
the dense foliage of the country. Agent Orange is now identified as a 
contributor to certain health problems and birth defects. Veterans no 
longer need to establish proof of exposure to Agent Orange other than to 
prove they were physically in Vietnam. They also no longer need to prove 
a connection to specific health issues that stem from contact with Agent 
Orange. They only need to prove they have one of the 14 defined Agent 
Orange health issues. The VA anticipates a large swell of applications 
from Vietnam Veterans for medical services as well as disability claims. 



65 



The World War II memorial plaque at Dale Street School is currently in 
need of repair. School Superintendent Robert Maguire formed a 
committee to look into the updating or replacing of this memorial. I 
became part of that committee. The committee determined that repair was 
not feasible resulting in a continued study to replace it. The effort is 
ongoing with a goal for dedication in May of 201 1. 

Most of our WWII veterans are in their 80's with our Korean Veterans in 
their 70's. Both populations are in rapid decline through relocation to 
Vine Lake. Our last decoration is providing a flag grave marker. An 
adequate supply of WWII and Korean markers has been obtained. Each 
year prior to Memorial Day these flags are replaced for all Veterans at 
Vine Lake. G. Marshall Chick had performed that labor of love for more 
than 50 years. Marshall began when he was very young by his Father's 
side and now his nephew Frank Iafolla will continue that service for our 
deceased Veterans. 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department of Veteran Services 
under Chapter 115 authorizes services and assistance rendered Medfield 
Veterans and their dependents. The State processes are now automated 
through the use of Web-VSMIS (Veterans Services Management 
Information System). This office is now fully compliant with Internet 
submission of applications and claims as well as Treasurer Georgia 
Colivas' electronic approval leading to state reimbursements. 

Veterans' Services hours of operation at Town Hall are now scheduled on 
Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. In an effort to reach out more into the 
community, Veterans hours are also regularly scheduled at 'The CENTER 
at Medfield". Veteran Services is also reachable by phone at 508-906- 
3025 and through email at RGriffin@Medfield.net 

During the transition of Veterans' Services this year, special thanks must 
be extended to Town Clerk Carol Mayer, Norma Cronin and the Town of 
Westwood Veterans' Services. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Ronald Clark Griffin 
Veterans' Service Officer 

66 



Memorial Day Address 

Given by Ron Griffin 

U.S. Air Force 



Good morning fellow citizens, 

I stand before you today not as one of Medfield's higher achievers, but as one of 
its typical citizens. Throughout our history it has often been our typical or dare I 
say ordinary citizens who have put their personal pursuits on hold to serve a 
cause greater than their own. It was ordinary farmers, blacksmiths and merchants 
that formed this country's earliest militia. While today their occupations may be 
different, their commitment is no less. Giving their last breath for our country, 
many of these ordinary citizens never lived long enough to develop careers or 
families of their own. They were brothers, sisters, friends and neighbors long 
before they became soldiers. Each was someone's special son or daughter. 

I volunteered to serve in the Air Force during the time of the Vietnam War. That 
war lasted from 1961 to 1975. During each of those 14 years my Mother had one 
and sometimes two sons serving in the armed forces. Fate was kind to her four 
sons and her fears of becoming a Gold Star Mother were never realized. She and 
my father got to enjoy watching them go on to have careers, raise families and 
live their own ordinary lives. 

I grew up in a rural section of Franklin. Not far down the street lived my 
neighbor Alan Willard. He was my age; in fact he was only seven days older 
than I. From the first grade on, each school day we boarded the same bus, went 
to the same schools and often were in the same classroom. Shortly after high 
school graduation we both joined the air Force. 

On February 18, 1968 Alan found himself at Tan Son Nhut airport in Vietnam. 
He had completed his yearlong tour of duty in Vietnam and with duffle bag 
packed was waiting to begin his long journey back home. That day the airport 
was shelled by artillery and our neighbor Mrs. Willard became a Gold Star 
Mother. 

It is impossible to determine what might have been; perhaps Alan was destined to 
great things in life or become like me, an ordinary person. An ordinary person, 
who might have been a productive member of our society, found love, married, 
raised a family and perhaps even got to grow old. But at the age of twenty his 
book of life was closed with so few chapters. Most of us here today can attest 
that some of life's best chapters are written after the age of twenty. Those 
unwritten chapters might have affected so many, indeed a slight change of 
circumstance, could have resulted in Alan speaking before you today instead of 
me. 

67 



Let me tell you about another family. 

He was born over 80 years ago so he parades around town pretending to be an 
ordinary senior citizen. His name is James (Duke) Sproul. He graduated from 
Medfield High School and went on to college. He joined the Army Air Corp 
during World War II and became a fighter pilot. After marrying his high school 
sweetheart he was dispatched to Alaska where he helped defend our northwest 
borders. Following WWII he remained in the Air Force and continued his 
education, receiving his Masters degree and then his Doctorate. He and his 
family eventually returned to Medfield. Following his retirement from the Air 
Force, Doc Sproul went on to teach science at Medfield High School for over 
twenty years. He established and coached Medfield's first high school golf team. 
His long life story is filled with many exciting chapters. 

Doc's older brother also joined the Army Air Corp during WWII and he became 
a bomber pilot. He was dispatched to the European theater. Today he can be 
remembered each time we pass Robert Sproul Road. Our small town has many 
such streets, squares, parks and memorials all representing someone's brief life's 
story. Throughout our nation, there is this evidence of life stories shortened by a 
commitment that put the interests and safety of others, before their own. They 
populate our cemeteries or like Robert Sproul lay in peace in some far away land 
or beneath some body of water. 

Seven Score and Seven years ago President Lincoln gave his Gettysburg 
Address. He feared that over time, that last full measure of devotion of so many 
of our citizens might be forgotten. Yet, here we are today, the living, gathered to 
honor and remember, highly resolved that all those sacrifices shall not be 
forgotten. While our remembering does not add chapters to their brief life 
stories, it does breathe life back into those chapters. 

Chief Mann, distinguished guests, companion participants, Fellow Legionnaires' 
and Ladies Auxiliary, Medfield's Finest, Medfield's Bravest, Medfield's School 
Band, The Medfield Lions, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Cub Scouts, Brownies, and 
fellow citizens, thank you for your commitment this day to remember our 
ordinary citizens who made an extraordinary sacrifice. 



68 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Board of Health, with reluctance, accepted the resignation of Elizabeth 
Dorisca this past September. Having faithfully served as associate member, 
member and chairman, Mrs. Dorisca' s participation on the Board has left an 
indelible mark which highlights the qualities she espouses: care, concern and 
improvement to the lives of those in this community. The staff serving the board 
truly appreciates her dedication and support. Betsy's leadership and wisdom 
made everyone's job easier. The members of the board wish her well and, 
welcome Kathleen Rose and Wendy Jackson to serve with the board in an effort 
to continue this invaluable service. 

Again this year, the Board of Health recognizes and thanks the members of the 
community who continue to assist the town through various volunteer efforts, 
including the Medical Reserve Corps, the Tick/Lyme Disease Community Panel 
and the Angel Tree volunteers. The continuing participation of residents enables 
these programs to exist. 

Any resident who would like to volunteer in any capacity is encouraged to 
contact the Board of Health office at (508) 906-3006. 

Public Health : 

Jean Sniffin, RN, of Century Health Systems continues to provide programs in 
health promotion to all age groups, supplementing traditional home health 
services. The major components of the Health Promotion Program are 
Communicable Disease, Public Health and Health Maintenance, 

Prevention and control of communicable disease through caseload referrals, 
education and provision of follow up care consistent with public health practice. 
In 2010 the total surveillance disease reports numbered 77, with 51 identified as 
Lyme disease. 

Jean provides home visits as needed to residents who are homebound and have 
multiple chronic illnesses or conditions. The goal of the program is to assess 
changes in physical condition and the appropriate referral for medical care and/or 
social services. This prevents complications and unnecessary hospitalizations. 

The public is encouraged to meet with Jean Sniffin during her public outreach 
times, the first and third Tuesday of each month. Jean is available from 1 1 :30 to 
12:30 at the Board of Health office in the Town Hall. 



69 



Public Clinics are conducted twice per month at 1:00 pm as follows: 

The first Tuesday of each month at The CENTER at Medfield; and on 
The third Tuesday of each month at Tilden Village on Pound Street. 

Ambulatory residents will be seen for physical assessment, health counseling, 
including hypertension screening. Please contact the Board of Health office if 
you have any questions. 

Sanitarian : 

Public Protection Specialists, LLC (PPS) professional staff conducted consulting 
services for enforcement of regulations related to food establishments, minimum 
housing standards, swimming facilities, recreational camps for children, and 
general sanitation issues. 

The services and consultation to the Board of Health included attending monthly 
Board meetings, inspections of food establishments and school cafeterias, 
conducting establishment plan reviews and providing consultation to residents, 
business owners, and municipal departments as necessary. New food 
establishments were provided with consultation for the opening of their new 
businesses throughout the application process. 

In addition, PPS conducted public health emergency preparedness consulting 
services. This included updating the Medfield Board of Health Emergency 
Dispensing Site (EDS) plan and completing several MA Department of Public 
Health Emergency Preparedness deliverable requirements. A home preparedness 
seminar was conducted for residents and Medfield Medical Reserve Corps 
(MRC) volunteers; including a demonstration of putting together a 72-hour 
emergency kit. 



2010 Permits Issued: 

47 Food Services Permit (includes: food retail, food service, food service 

kitchen and catering) 

10 Temporary Food Establishment Permits 

1 1 Tobacco 

1 Semi Public Pool 

1 Bathing Beach 

3 Camps 

1 MRVP Inspections 



70 



Environmental and Civil Engineer Services 

William WR. Domey. P.E., M.S.C.E., provided Environmental and Civil 
Engineering services to the Board of Health. These services include: Oversight 
of septic systems including soil evaluations, determination of high groundwater, 
review of engineering plans for compliance with Title 5 and the Board of Health 
regulations, inspection of construction, evaluation of variance requests, and 
issuance of certificates of compliance; Review of Site Plans and preliminary and 
definitive Subdivision Plans for compliance with the Board of Health stormwater 
regulations and suitability for on-site sewage disposal where applicable; Review 
of On-site Well water proposals, water quality and quantity results, and treatment 
units: Review of Title 5 inspection reports (45 in 2010) that are performed, most 
often at time of sale, to assure that the inspector has followed the state mandated 
procedures for the evaluation; Review of Building Permit applications for 
additions and renovations to assure that the proposed work does not conflict with 
the location or capacity of the septic system serving the property; Investigation of 
complaints regarding sewage overflows, odors, illegal dumping, hazardous 
waste, and preparation of enforcement orders where applicable, and working with 
offending parties to attain compliance; Issuance of Disposal System Installer and 
Septage Hauler Permits; Provision of general consultation to the Board of Health; 
Assistance to the Board of Health in the preparation of regulations and 
guidelines; Attendance at Board of Health meetings; and Telephone or office 
consultation for questions and information of residents. 

During 2010, as in previous years, a major focus of the Environmental 
Engineer/Agent has been septic systems, stormwater management, and site plan 
and subdivision reviews. As a result of a high degree of control over septic 
systems, the rate of failure of septic systems constructed since 1975 remains very 
low. For those who must upgrade, it should be noted that, to assist homeowners 
to minimize financial burden, the Board of Health issues local and state variances 
as needed to achieve Maximum Feasible Compliance. These variances have to be 
justified by documentation of difficult or limited site conditions or excessive 
construction costs. Guidelines are available at the Board of Health office. 

Reviews of proposed Site Plans and Subdivisions for Storm Water Management 
and other environmental factors were completed, continued or newly conducted 
for Medfield State Hospital; Montrose School Sports Facility: Town of Medfield 
Public Works Garage; 45 West Street commercial building; and 90-96 North 
Street. It should be noted that the long-standing existing stormwater regulations 
of the Board of Health provide Town of Medfield compliance with much of the 
EPA Phase II program. 

A new major focus is the work at the Medfield State Hospital. Upon request of 
the Board of Health, the engineer has agreed to participate in the Medfield State 
Hospital Environmental Review Committee (SHERC) and participate in their 
various meetings and reviews. 

71 



The following permits were issued during 2010: 



9 Soil Tests 


15 


Hauler's Permits 


9 Septic System Plan Reviews 


16 


Installer's Permits 


3 Septic System (new/upgrade) 


8 


OFFAL Permits 


6 Septic Repair 


43 


Form A - Addition 
Renovations 


Medfield Youth Outreach: 







Purpose - Medfield Youth Outreach (MYO) is a program located under the 
auspices of the Medfield Board of Health. The town's Youth Outreach Workers 
provide short term individual and family counseling, information and referral, 
crisis intervention, community programming, and assistance with access to 
financial assistance programs to Medfield residents ages birth to eighteen and 
their families. The Medfield Youth Outreach office is an intake site for the 
Federal Fuel Assistance Program for all Medfield residents. All of Medfield 
Youth Outreach services are free and confidential. 

The Medfield Youth Outreach Office is located on the 2 nd floor of the Town Hall. 
Appointments can be made by calling (508) 359-7121. Hours are full time and 
flexible to meet programmatic need. 

Information about MYO Staff- 

• Dawn Alcott, MSW, LICSW, is the Director of Medfield Youth 
Outreach 

• Amanda Peterson, MA, LMHC, is the Medfield Youth Outreach Worker 

The Board of Health Liaison to MYO is Board of Health Member, Marcia 
Aigler. Marcia meets with Medfield Youth Outreach regularly and 
communicates with the Board of Health regarding Medfield Youth Outreach 
issues and activities. 

Counseling Services - Counseling is provided to Medfield youth and families 
through individual therapy sessions and support groups. Counseling issues 
addressed most frequently in 2010 include: 

Academic difficulties, divorce, self-esteem, anger management, domestic 
violence, anxiety, family discord, sexual assault, grief and loss, financial 
difficulties, sexuality, body image/eating disorders, major mental illness, social 
skill concerns, child abuse/neglect, oppositional behavior, substance abuse, 
dating violence, parenting skills, violence, depression, self harming behaviors, 
friendship/ relationship concerns 



72 



Referrals -Medfield Youth Outreach routinely provides outside referrals for 
clinical services, need based programs, substance abuse services, support groups, 
wrap around services, advocacy, local discretionary funds, and state /federal 
programs. In 2010, there was an increase in referrals containing some aspect of 
financial or needs based assistance, and many related to substance abuse. There 
was also an increase in referrals made pertaining to the effects of grief and loss 
and divorce and separation on youth/families. 

Programs - Medfield Youth Outreach also facilitates various groups, programs, 
and services within the community as able. This programming is related to the 
needs of youth and their families. The programs offered are often prevention and 
psycho-educationally based. In 2010, through the Peer Leadership Program, 
Medfield Youth Outreach enjoyed helping students create a student produced 
prevention movie including real life stories from the community. This movie 
was shown to the entire high school as part of pre-prom preparation. The 
clinicians at Medfield Youth Outreach further enjoyed participating in youth and 
parent education for local groups in the community as well as bringing in special 
services to some organizations to address urgent needs. 

Community Collaboration - Medfield Youth Outreach continues to collaborate 
with a wide network of organizations to better meet the needs of Medfield youth 
and their families including: The Medfield Youth and Community Commission. 
Medfield Public Schools, Medfield Police Department, Norfolk County District 
Attorney's Office, The South Middlesex Opportunity Council Fuel Assistance 
Program, Medfield Food Cupboard, Medfield Home Committee, The Medfield 
Angel Run Fund, Medfield Youth Substance Abuse Initiative, Medfield Cares 
About Prevention, Riverside Community Care, and various other state and 
federal agencies, professional associations, clinical services, religious 
institutions, parent gatherings, and civic organizations. 

Volunteers - Medfield Youth Outreach welcomes volunteers of all ages to assist 
with the implementation of various programs and fundraising endeavors. 
Opportunities arise throughout the year. Assistance with youth prevention 
programs, parent education programs, and hands on assistance during holiday gift 
programs are predictable opportunities available. Mentoring opportunities for 
teens mentoring younger elementary age children are also available. All 
volunteering is time limited with a specific purpose. Call the Medfield Youth 
Outreach office at 508-359-7121 to inquire. 

Donations - Medfield Youth Outreach is always seeking to expand services and 
create innovative programming. Grant funding and donations have been utilized 
to purchase items for the office, cover the cost of presentations, and to cover 
programming related expenses when possible. Donations can be made to 
Medfield Youth Outreach through a check made out to the Medfield Youth 

73 



Outreach Gift Account. For a tax deductible donation it is possible to donate to 
Medfield Youth Outreach through the Medfield Foundation. 

REPORT OF THE NORFOLK COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL 

PROJECT 

The operational program of the Project integrates all proven technologies into an 
Integrated Pest Management (IPM) 

system of mosquito control and vector management that is rational, 
environmentally sensitive and cost effective. 

Surveillance: Surveys, inspections, and monitoring in support of our program 
include GIS mapping of breeding areas, larval and adult collections, and 
fieldwork evaluations leading to better water management. West Nile virus and 
Eastern Equine Encephalitis have been active in Norfolk County over the past 
several years which has resulted in an expansion of the surveillance program in 
collaboration with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH), 
State Laboratory Institute. MDPH has requested that the Norfolk County 
Mosquito Control Project expand mosquito surveillance 

across the county for the purpose of detecting viruses in collected mosquitoes as 
an early warning system for the residents of the county. Considerable manpower 
has been reallocated to these efforts, which is not reflected in this report. All 
mosquito eggs need water to hatch and to sustain larval growth. 

Water Management Activities: An important component of our IPM approach 
is the management of shallow, standing, stagnant water, and the maintenance of 
existing flow systems which if neglected can contribute to mosquito breeding. 
Site visits, pre and post monitoring, photographic documentation, survey 
measurements, flagging, accessing assessors information, maintenance of 
paperwork and electronic forms, communication with and/or meeting on site with 
residents, town/state/federal officials and maintaining regulatory compliance are 
all important aspects of this program. In addition to normal drainage system 
maintenance, Project personnel advise residents on removal of water holding 
artificial containers on their property for the purpose of eliminating potential 
West Nile virus mosquito breeding habitat. 

Drainage ditches checked/cleaned 6,405 feet 

Intensive Hand Cleaning*/ Brush Cut 95 feet 

Culverts checked /cleaned 26 culverts 

* Combination of brush cutting and clearing of severely degraded drainage 
systems or streams by hand 

Larval Control: Treatment of mosquito larvae during aquatic development is the 
next most effective control effort. These applications were conducted after 
devoting many man hours to collecting larval data which is used for targeting 

74 



purposes as well as for determining efficacy of these applications. The products 
used during these applications were Bti (Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis) and 
Methoprene. 

Aerial larvicide applications 767 acres 

Larval control - briquette & granular applications by hand 8.1 acres 

Rain Basin treatments - briquettes by hand (West Nile virus control) 525 basins 

Adult Control: The suppression of flying adult mosquitoes becomes necessary 
when they are numerous, annoying, and/or threaten public health. These 
applications are conducted based on residential complaints as well as by 
analyzing adult mosquito population data collected from light traps. Additional 
applications may have occurred following identification of mosquito born viruses 
such as West Nile virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis. The product used 
during these applications was Sumithrin. 

Adult control aerosol applications from trucks 5,900 acres 



Respectfully submitted by John J. Smith, Director of the Norfolk County 
Mosquito Control Project 

The Board of Health holds its meetings on the third Wednesday of each month at 
6:30 PM. These meetings are open to the public and citizens are invited to 
attend. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Melissa Savilonis, Chairperson 
Marcia Aigler, Member 
Kathleen Schapira, Member 
Kathleen Rose, Member 
Wendy Jackson, Associate Member 



75 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The CENTER continues to provide valuable services to our senior community by 
providing transportation, meals, counseling, and a variety of other benefits. The 
Council on Aging remains under the guidance of board members: Louis Fellini, 
Chairman, Virginia Whyte, Vice Chairman, Neil DuRoss, Patricia Shapiro and 
Michael Clancy. Each member has been instrumental in providing support and 
direction to the Council on Aging and the facility. The Council on Aging staff 
includes Roberta Lynch, R.N. as Director, Cheryl Lavallee, LICSW as Outreach 
Worker, and Susan Bernstein, MA as the Volunteer Coordinator. 

As we end our third year in the building, we continue to see growth in programs 
and participation. The building serves as a hub for the older adults in Medfield, 
with over 14,700 visits for programs in and out of the building. Often the 
CENTER is referred to as "a home away from home". As we start our fourth 
year in the building the COA will continue to offer innovative programs, a 
variety of exercise classes, mind stimulating classes, a diverse cross section of 
programs, all of it appealing to the hundreds of people that participate at the 
CENTER. 

As new people enter the building, they are still in awe of the design and 
surroundings of this facility. This past year our Friends of Seniors, Inc. provided 
the CENTER with additional cabinets in the kitchen, a wall of cabinets in the 
activity room, a new riding lawn mower and many other contributions that have 
made the CENTER, its programs and events so special. Also, FOSI provided the 
financing for the DPW to build a beautiful; much enjoyed and appreciated Bocce 
Court at the CENTER. 

The Council on Aging coordinates and works with other human service agencies, 
voluntary organizations, citizen's associations, governmental agencies, area 
agencies on aging and others in the community to provide services to the older 
adults in the community. The Council on Aging mission is to foster an 
atmosphere of wellness by addressing the emotional, social, and physical and 
often, spiritual needs of individuals and their families during the aging process. 
Our focus is to enhance the quality of life and promote independence through the 
sharing of information, programming, services, and referrals to appropriate 
agencies. 

The following is a sampling of the services the COA provides: fitness and 
exercise classes, educational and social programs, food shopping assistance, 
friendly visiting, individual and group support, health benefits counseling, health 

76 



screenings, health services, assistance with fuel and food stamp applications, 
supporting home delivered meals, home repair referral, housing assistance, 
medical equipment loans, legal assistance, Ride applications, snow shoveling 
program, social day referrals, transportation, wellness checks, veteran's 
counseling, salon services, daily congregate meals, tax work-off program and a 
variety of unique trips. 

As always, the Council on Aging and the CENTER would like to thank the 
Board of Selectmen and the citizens of Medfield for their support. It is your 
interest and support that helps the Council on Aging meet so many needs of the 
older adults in our community. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Roberta Lynch, Director 
Louis Fellini, Chair-person 
Virginia Whyte Vice Chair-person 
Patricia Shapiro 
Neil DuRoss 
Michael Clancy 




77 



PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Park and Recreation Commission is a five member, elected board 
of volunteers. The Commission is charged with the responsibility of maintaining 
the Pfaff Community Center and 1 1 other public properties - Town Hall, Library, 
Historical Society, Dwight Derby House, Fire Department/Police Department, 
Metacomet Park, Hinkley Park and Swim Pond, Baxter Park, Meeting House 
Pond and McCarthy Park. The recently moved Lowell Mason House will be 
relocated to Hinkley Park and grounds maintenance will be provided by Parks & 
Recreation. 

The Commission's responsibilities include: recruiting qualified personnel; 
creating policies; generating diversified recreational and educational 
opportunities; monitoring the maintenance schedule for public properties; and 
advising the Director to achieve the goals set forth in the Park and Recreation 
Comprehensive Plan. The department consists of a Director, Program 
Coordinator, Equipment Operator/Landscaper and an Office Assistant. 
Additional personnel are recruited to teach classes and supervise summer 
programs. The department's responsibilities include: creating, implementing, 
evaluating and adjusting year round leisure experiences; establishing fiscal and 
personnel plans to complete the objectives for each program; monitoring public 
property usage; and implementing an ongoing maintenance plan for Town 
properties. 

The department continues to face many challenges in light of the economic 
downturn and slow recovery. We began the year with a level funded operating 
budget and anticipated supplementing operating expenses with fees from 
program registrations and rentals. A decrease in revolving funds has resulted in 
further cut backs including reducing the Administrative Assistant position to 
part-time. Funding has been eliminated for some recreation programs in order to 
supplement basic operating expenses including: Spring/Fall fests, summer 
concerts, ice rink, swim team and the scholarship program that were previously 
free or at a low cost to the public have either been eliminated or funded through 
private initiatives, donations or increased fees. Many Medfield residents have 
experienced a decline in their family's discretionary income resulting in lower 
participation in recreation programs and reducing the need to hire large numbers 
teenagers for summer positions. We continue to collect fees for facility and field 
rentals in addition to programs. We have replaced the outsourced Maintenance 
Contract with an Equipment Operator/Landscaper which has reduced the overall 
maintenance budget and increased the maintenance response time and has kept 
the fields and facilities playable and safe. 

78 



The department is optimistic and is seeking alternative funding to reinstate 
services. We continue to be a vibrant part of Medfield by building community 
through activities. I have been impressed by the groups that have actively 
fundraised to fund their particular programs. The department has also reviewed 
all of our contracted services and restructured our operations to reduce expenses. 

The Commission realizes that it is still not the right time to propose a new 
Recreation Center, therefore, have focused their efforts on improving the existing 
Pfaff Center. Following an extensive energy audit, we have replaced old drafty 
windows with energy efficient replacement windows. The staff has spent a 
considerable amount of time and energy painting and cleaning the Pfaff Center in 
an effort to make the building more presentable. 

The Park and Recreation Department is dedicated to providing affordable 
programs that will enhance the quality of life for Medfield residents. We offered 
over three hundred affordable enrichment programs throughout the year. Over 
six thousand individual participants have enjoyed participating in a wide range of 
programs, competed on our athletic fields, reflected in our memorial park and 
utilized our recreational facilities. Park and Recreation is a vital and affordable 
resource that brings our community together. 

We would like to take this opportunity to thank the scores of residents who 
volunteer their time and energies in our recreation and sports programs. 



Respectfully submitted, 

James Snyder, Director of Parks and Recreation 

Kevin Ryder, Program Coordinator 

Paula Carrol, Office Assistant 

Brian Schools, Equipment Operator/Landscaper 

Tom Cararagliano 

Lisa Louttit 

Mel Seibolt 

Nick Brown 



79 



TREE WARDEN AND INSECT CONTROL DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This report is for the calendar year ending December 31, 2010. 

There was damage to many trees due to snow, rain and high winds this year. In 
the future, we will need to replace a Tree Department bucket truck to help with 
these efforts. 

Approximately 20 major dead trees and stumps were removed around Town. 
Due to safety concerns, we continue to monitor a large oak tree in the Town 
Pound. 

The Asian Long Horned Beetle has not been found in Medfield. We are still 
watching for signs of the beetle. We recommend that all firewood should be 
purchased locally due to concerns of the Long Horned Beetle. 

This year tree damage was minimal due to Gypsy moth. There have been some 
reported cases of Lyme disease due to the high volume of deer in Town. 

Stumpy' s Tree Service is in their last year of their three-year contract. 

The Tree Department would like to thank Lueder Environmental Tree & 
Landscaping Company for their help and professional advice throughout the 
year. 

Residents are reminded that if they DO NOT wish spraying to be done on their 
property, prior notice must be sent to the Town Clerk by registered mail no later 
than March 1 st of that year. This notice must be given each year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Edward M. Hinkley 

Tree Warden 

Director of Insect Pest and Pest Control 



80 






METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) is a regional planning 
agency serving the people who live and work in the 101 cities and towns of 

Greater Boston. With a mission to promote smart growth and regional 

collaboration, MAPC's work is guided by our regional plan, "MetroFuture: 

Making a Greater Boston Region." 



This year, we have increasingly focused our work on helping municipalities to 
collaborate across city and town borders, to achieve savings through new 
efficiencies, to capitalize on the existing and multifaceted resources of Greater 
Boston, and to explore innovation in unexpected ways. As fiscal challenges have 
intensified at the local level, MAPC has amplified its commitment to partnering 
with cities and towns in offering progressive solutions. We're expanding our 
reach into new areas - from the federal policy arena, to green energy 
development, and interactive gaming as a tool for community engagement - 
while keeping an eye toward preservation, sustainability, and responsible 
stewardship of our shared resources. In every effort we undertake, MAPC works 
toward a more equitable, livable Greater Boston region. 

This year, we are heartened to have the Obama Administration's support for the 
smart growth ideals put forth in our regional plan, MetroFuture. We are honored 
to be among a select group of grant recipients from the Sustainable Communities 
Partnership, a new federal collaboration among HUD, the EPA, and the U.S. 
Department of Transportation. With this grant, MAPC can go further in 
promoting sustainable development in Greater Boston. 

The coming year will bring the first activities under the grant, which could total 
more than $4.5 million over three years when matching commitments from 
regional foundations are included. The Metro Boston Sustainable Communities 
Consortium - which includes municipalities, non-profits, and institutional allies - 
will oversee our work under the grant. The heart of the work plan features several 
illustrative projects poised to benefit from Sustainable Communities funding. 

They include: 

• Enhancing the Fairmount transit corridor through Dorchester, 
Mattapan and Hyde Park in Boston; 

• Engaging the Asian communities in Chinatown, Quincy, and Maiden 
in planning efforts; 

• Creating an anti-displacement strategy for residential areas along the 
planned Green Line extension in Somerville; 



81 



• Identifying priority preservation and development areas along the Route 
495/MetroWest corridor; and 

• Studying office park retrofit potential for the Framingham Tech Park, 
and exploring opportunities for linkage to the downtown commuter rail 
station. 

All of these initiatives - and others that will be added as the program develops - 
will help the region to plan and grow responsibly, with a focus on future 
stewardship of our shared resources. In addition to this local work, MAPC will 
develop tools and models, build skills and capacity throughout the region, design 
and advocate for smart growth policies in state and local government, and track 
the region's progress through a Regional Indicators Program. 

At the core of our mission is serving as a resource to our member municipalities. 
One of the most important ways MAPC serves cities and towns is to foster 
forward-thinking economic development opportunities. In 201 1, we are focusing 
much of our economic development work in clean energy and local business 
development. 

MAPC links federal resources to emerging green technology start-ups like the 
Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems. Fraunhofer is a non-profit 
applied research and development laboratory located in the heart of Boston's 
Innovation District on the South Boston waterfront, dedicated to the 
commercialization of clean energy technologies. We also provide support and 
advocacy for emerging business incubators such as the Cleantech Inno Venture 
Center in Lynn. This business incubator is designed to reduce the start-up 
expenses of small clean technology companies, while accelerating the time it 
takes to transform a research idea into a marketable product. 

In Gloucester, MAPC is helping to build a cluster of marine research institutes 
on and around the harbor - adding strength to a historic fishing-based economy. 
We are also working with the Dorchester Bay Economic Development 
Corporation to place job training facilities within walking distance of 
neighborhoods in need, and to provide skill-based training in partnership with 
larger businesses that are seeking trained employees. 

MAPC also plans to unveil a web-based business development tool that will 
allow cities in Greater Boston's urban core to market hard-to-sell commercial 
and industrial real estate to appropriate buyers. The website, Choose Metro 
Boston, can be found at www.choosemetroboston.com . 

Our energy planning will continue to grow as we start developing energy 
strategies for Chelsea and Revere, and as we explore similar opportunities across 
the region. All our green energy work is guided by our Green Energy 
Campaign, which is an effort to achieve the energy goals of MetroFuture by 

82 



building local capacity, increasing energy efficiency, and developing alternate 
energy resources. In the coming year, proposed energy-related projects include 
developing a regional ESCO, or Energy Services Company, which would provide 
comprehensive energy efficiency services for multiple municipalities and school 
districts; developing a site suitability assessment for wind or solar energy on 
closed landfill and brownfield sites; and creating a regional energy manager 
service, which would provide MAPC staff support for a wide range of local 
energy work. 

In many municipalities, MAPC can best help to achieve smart growth goals 
through targeted zoning bylaw work. This year, MAPC worked with the town of 
Littleton Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and a faithful cadre of concerned 
citizens over several months to draft, review and finalize two zoning bylaws: a 
new Village Common zone, and an Overlay zone. 

The Village Common zone created a new business district along Routes 1 1 9 and 
110, where mixed use development will be allowed so long as new design 
guidelines are met. In the Overlay zone, created along Route 119, a vacant 90- 
acre site once owned by Cisco Systems may now be more easily redeveloped. 
MAPC presented the zoning changes at Town Meeting, helping to usher the 
bylaws toward adoption. Both zoning changes will help the town control and 
attract development consistent with both MetroFuture and the community's 
vision. 

The District Local Technical Assistance (DLTA) program is another essential 
vehicle for helping communities to achieve such goals. DLTA is a state funding 
program that helps cities and towns to collaborate regionally on housing, 
economic development, and environmental protection projects. The funding can 
also be used to help municipalities to coordinate and more efficiently deliver 
local services. 2010 was by any measure a prolific year for DLTA-funded 
projects in municipalities throughout the region. 

There were a total of 19 projects approved for funding this year - 10 in land use 
planning, and nine in municipal services. More than two dozen communities 
received help from MAPC on land use planning projects thanks to DLTA 
funding, the majority involving research or drafting local zoning bylaws. There 
are 39 cities and towns currently participating in municipal services projects, 
such as examining how to save funds or provide expanded services by sharing 
engineering staff, public health offices, and even ambulances. Since many of 
these projects affect multiple municipalities, the total number of cities and towns 
served is 57 - a record high for the program. 

With DLTA funding, MAPC and the MetroWest Regional Collaborative are 
conducting a MetroWest Regional Open Space Connectivity study. This study 
will coordinate all the individual open space plans among MetroWest cities and 

83 



towns, allowing open spaces to become linked into an interconnected network 
that will cross municipal boundaries and serve a variety of regional needs. The 
study will also identify and prioritize lands that are ripe for protection or 
acquisition for open space. 

Using DLTA funds, MAPC assisted Bellingham in writing a Housing Production 
Plan in 2010, the first of what we hope will be many such plans crafted by 
MAPC. Housing Production Plans help cities and towns guide local affordable 
housing developments. Another tool, the Smart Growth Zoning and Housing Act 
(Chapter 40R), offers financial incentives to encourage cities and towns to zone 
for compact residential and mixed-use development in smart growth locations. 
These districts are catching on slowly across Eastern Massachusetts, and MAPC 
is currently working to prepare a 40R District for Sharon. 

On the North Shore, MAPC is working with Beverly, Danvers, Hamilton, 
Ipswich, Salem and Wenham to solicit local input on Priority Development 
Areas and Priority Preservation Areas, as part of a $68,000 grant from the 
Massachusetts Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development. 



Transportation planning is central to all facets of MAPC s work. The economic 
vitality of the region is dependent on a strong transportation network, and 
continued investment in all modes of transportation - roads, bridges, sidewalks, 
bicycle infrastructure, and public transit - is crucial to Greater Boston's ongoing 
competitiveness. 

MAPC works toward sustainable transportation projects throughout the year, 
including the regional bike share system that is projected to launch in Boston in 
spring 2011. MAPC is collaborating with Boston, Cambridge, Somerville, and 
Brookline to link into Boston's system once it is established. The program will 
provide hundreds of stations, outfitted with several thousand bicycles, throughout 
the participating municipalities. Designed for short trips, the bike share system 
will provide a sustainable mode of transportation while extending access to 
public transit locations across the region. MAPC worked with Boston and the 
MBTA to secure a $3 million Federal Transit Administration grant to implement 
the program in 20 1 1 . 

In 2010, MAPC unveiled a comprehensive Pedestrian Transportation Plan 
with action steps that cities and towns can take to make their streets more 
walkable. Both a resource and a guide, the Pedestrian Transportation Plan 
identifies actions that local governments, advocacy groups, the private sector and 
individuals can take to increase pedestrian safety and convenience and to 
encourage more walking. The plan is available on our website, at 
www.mapc.org/resources/ped-plan. 

84 



MAPC is working collaboratively with three towns on the Upper Charles River 
to help them adapt to a series of new federal storm water regulations. 
Bellingham, Franklin and Milford were selected this year by the Environmental 
Protection Agency (EPA) to pilot stricter storm water regulations. These 
regulations are required to reduce unhealthy rates of pollution in the Charles 
River. 

The new regulations will attempt to reduce storm water flow and contaminated 
runoff into the watershed from private and public properties, which could cost 
the towns and property owners several million dollars to retrofit existing 
infrastructure. The regulations may eventually be extended to the rest of the 
Charles River and other watersheds in the region. 

To assist with these challenges, MAPC is working with three towns to explore 
creation of a storm water utility, a public entity that maintains storm water 
infrastructure and performs needed upgrades and capital improvements. As with 
water or sewer utilities, costs are covered by user fees, which are assessed on 
each property owner that contributes storm water runoff. 

Another area in which MAPC aids cities and towns in planning for the future is 
public safety. As municipal budgets grow tighter, cities and towns are 
increasingly seeking ways to maintain public safety services in the face of cuts, 
to build emergency preparedness, and to enhance their expertise by working with 
neighbors and allies. In keeping with our mission to promote regional 
collaboration, MAPC has helped to establish three regional emergency 
equipment cache sites, containing reserves of emergency equipment for large- 
scale use. The three sites - in Beverly, Framingham, and Lexington - help the 
region to be prepared for a major incident, by providing resources that 
municipalities most likely could not afford on their own. 

The cache sites offer first responders and public safety officials such equipment 
as shelters-in-a-box, cyanide detectors, cots, illuminated signs, and other tools for 
disaster preparedness. MAPC works in tandem with NERAC, the Northeast 
Homeland Security Regional Advisory Council, to offer these vital resources 
through a federal homeland security grant program. 

Throughout this year, despite of several budget cuts, the Metro Mayors 
Community Safety Initiative worked to maintain a strong police presence in 
troubled areas of the region through the Metro Gang Task Force and through 
additional patrols funded by the anti-crime Shannon Grant. High-risk and gang- 
involved youth experience intervention and prevention through Shannon Grant- 
funded programs, including more than 600 out-of-school activities and 
employment opportunities. 



85 



MAPC also helps municipalities to save money through our collective purchasing 
efforts, which allow cities and towns to make discounted bulk purchases of 
supplies, equipment, vehicles and more. Since its inception in 1998, the program 
has assisted dozens of municipal clients in saving millions of dollars. This year, 
we announced an exciting new partnership with the Fire Chiefs Association of 
Massachusetts, allowing MAPC to act as a collective purchasing agent for fire 
apparatus. This program has lots of potential to help communities save local 
dollars on major purchases, while improving the caliber of emergency vehicles 
and response capabilities. 

Another way MAPC is working with NERAC to support emergency planning is 
through a new evacuation route planning tool, which kicked off in 2010. The 
goal of the program is to create an intuitive mapping application that will provide 
local emergency responders with critical information during emergencies and 
evacuations. The project will feature online maps and a mapping application that 
will let users coordinate evacuations by referencing electronic route maps and 
resources from inside emergency response vehicles or emergency command 
centers. 

MAPC staff is also working on a first-in-the-nation dataset analyzing driving 
patterns, fuel consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions. Working in 
collaboration with MassGIS and the MIT Department of Urban Studies and 
Planning, we will collect and analyze data on vehicle miles travelled and fuel 
consumption based on odometer readings from vehicle inspection records. The 
data will help local, state, and regional entities develop effective strategies to 
reduce transportation-related greenhouse gas emissions and their associated 
climate impacts. The data also answer MetroFuture's call to focus new 
development in transportation-efficient locations. 

MAPC and WalkBoston are also conducting research on which school districts in 
the MAPC region have the best potential for encouraging more students to walk 
to school. This "Safe Routes to School" Analysis aims to shift school trips from 
cars to feet, which can reduce greenhouse gas production, air pollution, and 
traffic congestion around schools. Several studies estimate that up to 30 percent 
of morning commuter traffic is actually generated by parents driving children to 
school. Shifting even a small percentage back to walking could result in 
measurable reductions in emissions, as well as health benefits for children and 
community benefits for their neighborhoods. Once the most promising walkable 
school districts are identified, MAPC and WalkBoston will work with 
participating municipalities to devise a plan for increasing the number of students 
who walk to school in those areas. 

MAPC, an official Census Affiliate, helped promote Census participation 
throughout 2010, and will continue to monitor the results of the Census as data 
are released in 201 1. As the data come out, MAPC will assist municipalities and 

86 



non-profit partners with training and technical assistance. Data release schedules, 
new data and municipal profiles about your city or town, as well as training 
opportunities, can be found on the MetroBoston DataCommon, MAPC's online 
mapping tool, at www.metrobostondatacommon.org . 

As we work collaboratively and in innovative new ways throughout the year, we 
are mindful that all we do is guided by our bold regional plan, "MetroFuture." 

The development of the MetroFuture plan involved thousands of "plan builders" 
around the region, a group MAPC is now working to turn into "plan 
implementers," who will work to advance MetroFuture at the local, regional, and 
state levels. To engage old and new allies alike, MAPC launched the Friends of 
MetroFuture program with a well-attended open house in January 2010. This 
program will educate the public about key issues relating to MetroFuture 
implementation, and will build public energy for the change necessary to achieve 
MetroFuture' s goals. In the past year, the program has sponsored a photo 
contest, eight speakers on a wide range of topics, and three walking tours in the 
summer months, with similar activities planned for 2011. Check 

www.metrofuture.org for the full agenda. 

As always, building a constituency for change involves many partnerships with 
other like-minded organizations. MAPC was a founding member in the 
Massachusetts Smart Growth Alliance (MSGA), and remains active in its 
work. This year, MAPC and the MSGA kicked off the Great Neighborhoods 
Initiative, a campaign to link smart growth policy with 

place-based results. Throughout 201 1, MAPC and MSGA will work with several 
local organizations around the region as they make their neighborhoods into 
smart growth models. 

Finally, building regional support for smart growth principles requires research, 
expertise, a demonstrated record of local success, and - importantly - a 
commitment to legislative advocacy. We are proud to be pointing to a 
demonstrated track record of success both on Beacon Hill and in Washington. 

MAPC furthered its agenda of fostering regional collaboration by participating in 
the legislatively mandated Regionalization Advisory Commission. Chaired by 
Lieutenant Governor Timothy Murray, the commission studied impediments and 
benefits of regionalization over a broad spectrum of topics, ranging from public 
safety to energy and backroom office support. MAPC will use the findings of the 
commission's report to file a comprehensive piece of legislation in the 2011- 
2012 session, which will incentivize and remove barriers to sharing services 
across municipal boundaries. Additionally, MAPC and the MSGA were 
successful for the first time in advancing a piece of land use reform legislation 
favorably out of committee. Passage of comprehensive land use reform will 
continue to be a major priority for MAPC in the upcoming year. 

Check www.mapc.org for news and updates about MAPC's work throughout the 

year. 

J 87 



COUNTY OF NORFOLK 
A Message from the Norfolk County Commissioners 



To the Citizens of Norfolk County: 

Incorporated in 1793, the County of Norfolk includes twenty-eight cities and 
towns, mostly located to the South and West of Boston. 

Norfolk County is known as the County of Presidents because it is the birthplace 
of four Presidents of the United States: John Adams, John Quincy Adams, John 
F. Kennedy and George Herbert Walker Bush. 

County government is responsible for regional services which include the 
Registry of Deeds, County Agricultural High School, County Engineering, Trial 
Court facilities maintenance, Wollaston Recreational Facility, and other 
departments and services. 

A major transition during FY 2010 was the transfer of the County Sheriffs 
Department to the State, pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 61 of the Acts of 
2009. State, County and Sheriffs department staff and elected officials 
cooperated to implement the changeover, which took effect on January 1, 2010. 

The County continued to face the challenges of the continuing national recession. 
County revenues are directly impacted by the real estate and credit markets, in 
which conditions continued to be adverse. 

The County budget, in addition to adjustments for the Sheriffs transfer, strove to 
minimize costs while continuing efforts to maintain and improve services. 
Capital projects continued at County facilities, including preparatory work for the 
Norfolk County Law Library and other agencies to move to the Norfolk Registry 
building in Dedham. In cooperation with the Massachusetts School Building 
Authority, Norfolk County Agricultural High School began feasibility studies for 
major improvements at its Walpole campus. 

As in past years, we wish to take this opportunity to thank the County's 
department heads and employees, as well as elected officials, both state and 
local, for all their efforts on behalf of Norfolk County and its communities. 



88 



As County Commissioners, we are privileged to serve you. 
Very truly yours, 



Francis W. O'Brien, Chairman 
John M. Gillis 
Peter H. Collins 



Administrative Offices 

P.O. Box 310 

614 High Street 
Dedham MA 02027-03 10 

Telephone: (781)461-6105 
Facsimile: (781)326-6480 
E-mail: info@norfolkcounty.org 



89 



TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL 

SCHOOL DISTRICT 

ANNUAL REPORT 

2010 

In July, 2010, the School Committee reorganized and selected the following 
officers: Chair, Robert J. Rappa (Franklin), Vice Chair, Jonathan Dowse 
(Sherborn) and Secretary, Donald Seymour, (Norfolk). 

The School Committee conducts its regularly scheduled meetings on the third 
Wednesday of each month at 7:00 PM in the Conference Room at the school. 
Sub Committee meetings are scheduled as needed. 

Enrollment of Tri-County RVTHS continues to grow in all areas: in our 
secondary programs, our postsecondary programs and our continuing education 
classes. The ongoing increase in numbers is recognition of our successful three- 
fold mission: high vocational standards to train the workforce; high academic 
standards to prepare students for college; and high community service standards 
to prepare good citizens. 

These standards are visible in the achievements of our students and in their 
services throughout our member towns. The vocational skills of our students can 
be witnessed by all those who visit Tri-County RVTHS to take advantage of our 
services - Culinary Arts, Cosmetology, Auto Collision, Auto Technology and the 
like. Their vocational skills as well as civic skills are also visible out in the 
community when plumbing, carpentry, electrical and other programs work on 
public sector buildings and projects to save our towns labor costs in these 
difficult economic times. Finally, our students' abilities are on display in their 
cooperative education jobs throughout the district. 

The academic skills are visible in our students' achievements like winning the 
state-wide Vocational Mathematics Competition or the High Schools That Work 
Gold Achievement Award. Their academic skills are also evident when all 
students have passed MCAS since 2005 or when 60% of the graduating class 
continues on to further education. 

Their citizenship skills are also to be observed throughout the member towns as 
each one performs his/her annual mandatory community service. Look for them 
as they undertake projects to improve their local community oftentimes utilizing 
skills learned in their respective program majors here at Tri-County RVTHS. 

Recognition belongs not only to Tri-County 's students and staff but to its School 
Committee as well. Through the ongoing efforts of various subcommittees, the 
Tri-County School Committee has been able to accomplish several significant 
milestones. Working with the School Insurance Advisory Committee, it has been 

90 



able to reduce the school's share of employee health insurance costs from 90% 
for individuals to 65% and from 76% for families to 65%, while increasing co- 
payments from $5 to $15 and moving from self-insured to premium based 
coverage. All while maintaining the same health insurance plan. The School 
Committee has also successfully negotiated a TCTA contract in only seven 
meetings while granting no cost of living raise and, most impressively, has been 
able to operate school on a required minimum contribution budget. In other 
words, for the last two years, Tri-County has not asked member towns to 
contribute anything more than what the State has determined each town must 
contribute for the education of its students at Tri-County. The Committee 
recognizes the economic stress prevalent in our member towns and works 
collaboratively for the betterment of all. 

Graduation 

One hundred ninety seven students graduated in a notable afternoon ceremony on 
June 6, 2010. Superintendent-Director Barbara A. Renzoni, presided over the 
ceremony at which over 1 ,200 guests were present. School Committee members 
Jonathan Dowse and Paul Carbone presented the diplomas to the graduates. Jean 
Mallon, Director of Guidance, presented scholarships and awards totaling 
$108,100 to deserving seniors. 

Guidance & Special Education Services 

In September, 2009, Tri-County welcomed 964 students to the new school year. 
The respective number of students from member towns was as follows: Franklin 
201, Medfield 18, Medway 11, Millis 49, Norfolk 33, North Attleborough 253, 
Plainville 78, Seekonk 58, Sherborn 2, Walpole 68, and Wrentham 65. Also, 62 
students were enrolled from out-of-district towns. 

During the 2009-2010 school year the Guidance Department continued its 
programs to provide information to students, parents, sending schools and district 
communities. The Department provided counseling for students in career 
pathways and postsecondary education. Representatives of the Norfolk County 
District Attorney's Office made presentations to students about Internet Safety, 
Bullying and Substance Abuse. The Guidance Department, with the assistance 
of personnel from the Massachusetts Educational Financing Authority (MEFA), 
presented programs on college preparation. Tri-County hosted Career Days for 
over 2,500 Grade 8 students from the regional district. 

Guidance services include the development of a 4-year career plan for students in 
grades 9 through 12. The career plans are reviewed with parents at the annual 
parent-student-guidance counselor conference. Tri-County served as a pilot 
school for the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education's 
development of Your Plan for College. Your Plan for College is an electronic 
planning platform which can be accessed by parents, students, and counselors. 
Massachusetts Bay Community College personnel administered the Accu-Placer, 

91 



the state college placement test, to students, and presented workshops to teachers 
and students to strengthen secondary, postsecondary connections. 

Academics 

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School continues to earn wide- 
spread recognition for academic and vocational success by combining rigorous 
and challenging academic courses with modern vocational studies. The 
initiatives implemented through High Schools That Work allow Tri-County to be 
recognized as a forerunner in vocational education. Implementation of the 
newest technology as well as innovative vocational technical programs ensures 
student success. Their success is measured in the classroom and ultimately in a 
chosen career path whether it is higher education, entrance in their vocational 
trade or military careers. 

As a member of the High Schools That Work consortium Tri-County must 
participate in the HSTW Assessment which has been an integral tool in the 
school improvements efforts of participating states, districts and schools since its 
inception in 1988. The HSTW Assessment is administered to seniors in even- 
numbered years toward the beginning of the last semester of high school so 
results can reflect almost the entire high school career of the students while 
allowing time available for schools and students to make use of them. Students 
are tested in three subject areas: reading, mathematics and science. Based on the 
results of the 2010 HSTW Assessment, Tri-County was presented with the 
HSTW Gold Achievement Award during the annual HSTW Summer Conference. 
This award was given to schools that had 50 percent or more of students earn the 
HSTW Award of Educational Achievement based on their performance on the 
2010 HSTW Assessment. To earn this award, students must meet all three 
readiness goals (reading, mathematics, and science); complete the HSTW- 
recommended curriculum in at least two of three areas: English/language arts, 
mathematics and science; and meet graduation requirements for their individual 
vocational programs, the humanities or mathematics/science. 

Tri-County RVTHS was recognized by the Southern Regional Education Board 
(SREB) for equipping students with 21 st century skills through high quality 
career and technical programs. In the SREB publication, "Ready for Tomorrow: 
Six Proven Ideas to Graduate and Prepare More Students for College and the 
21 s ' Century Careers" (November 2009), Tri-County's Senior Project initiative 
was recognized as a promising practice for developing 21 st century skills that 
integrates academic learning with career technical education. The Senior Project 
allows students to discover how their academic knowledge and career technical 
skills can be integrated to create three components - a research paper on a topic 
in their assigned technical field, a related product or service, and a formal 
presentation. 



92 



Another area of recognition was the local Voice of Democracy Contest. The 
Voice of Democracy Contest was created in 1947 to foster patriotism by allowing 
students in grades 9 through 12 to voice their opinions on an annual theme. 
Many of our local students participated by composing essays, stories, and scripts 
based on a theme. In November 2009, four Tri-County students were chosen as 
winners of the VFW Post 3402 Voice of Democracy Contest based on their 
recordings of their essay scripts addressing the theme, "Does America Still Have 
Heroes?" 

Finally, Tri-County produced its own heroes when it hosted the Thirteenth 
Annual Vocational Mathematics Competition in the Kenneth Custy Gymnasium 
with eleven vocational schools from throughout the State competing for top 
honors. In a true team effort the Tri-County Math team placed first in the 
competition marking the fourth time the school has captured the trophy. 

Vocational Technical Programs 

Students in the Vocational Technical programs experienced many successes, both 
school wide, and in their individual career areas. The grade 10 and grade 11 
students from every vocational shop participated in the 10-hour OSHA training 
program in November. The training included 2 Vi days of interactive, specialized 
training in construction and general industry health and safety standards. 
Students passed the required exam and received a 10-hour OSHA green card. 

Tri-County students again achieved success at the State SkillsUSA Competition. 
In fact, Tri-County sent three secondary students and five postsecondary students 
to the National SkillsUSA Competition held in Kansas City this past June. A 
student in our Engineering Program won a gold medal in the Principles of 
Technology competition and our postsecondary Practical Nursing students came 
home with a bronze medal in First Aid and CPR and a silver medal in Practical 
Nursing competitions. 

Tri-County received a grant from the U.S. Army to help create a new Robotics 
Club. The students built a robot according to specifications to compete in the 
Boston FIRST Robotics Competition this past spring. Fifty teams from the 
United States and Europe competed for two days. Students created alliances with 
other schools, carefully choosing those teams with robots that were able to 
complete the greatest number of challenges. The teams controlled their highly 
specialized "robots" while receiving coaching from their teammates. The Tri- 
County Robotics Team achieved eighth place in this prestigious event, quite an 
accomplishment for their very first competition. 

Successes in Individual Vocational Technical Areas 

Auto Collision Repair : Students in the Auto Collision Repair Shop continued to 
serve the needs of the community and the Tri-County School District by 
repairing vehicles under the supervision of their instructors. 

93 



Auto Technology : Auto Technology continued to be one of the most popular 
vocational programs among grade 9 students this past year. Students in this shop 
repair, maintain, and service the Tri-County school vehicles as well as those of 
the public sector and residents from the Tri-County RVTHS eleven town district. 

Both Collision Repair and Auto Technology continue to be ASE Certified from 
the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation. This nationally 
recognized certification is considered to be the highest achievement known in the 
Automotive Industry. 

Carpentry : The Carpentry students were busy this past year completing ongoing 
outside projects, and assisted in the completion of construction of our own garage 
located at Tri-County RVTHS. Carpentry students continued to perform tasks 
aligned with the curriculum within the school building, such as construction of a 
room with a plexi-glass window in the Dean of Student's office, and installation 
of cabinetry in the Culinary Arts restaurant and the conference room. 

Computer Information Systems : Students in our CIS program continued to 
successfully pass certification tests in MOS, IC and A+. Tri-County RVTHS 
continued as a Prometric Testing Center this past school year. Our students were 
able to take their CISCO certification exams on the Tri-County campus. Teachers 
and students in the CIS Program were active members of the Robotics Team. 
They were instrumental in developing the computer program used in the Team's 
robot to successfully maneuver through the obstacles and perform specialized 
tasks during the previously mentioned Boston FIRST Competition. 

Construction Craft Laborer : Our newest vocational program focuses on training 
our students in occupations in large scale construction, such as bridges and 
tunnels. The first grade 9 class completed projects around the school including 
lining and grading for sidewalk construction at the garage located on Tri-County 
school grounds. Active participation by local representation of the construction 
and labor organization has led to a vibrant advisory board and generous 
donations to the program from local construction companies. 

Cosmetology : This program continues to engage the largest number of students. 
Students in grades 1 1 and 12 operate a full service salon including hair and nail 
service to members of the Tri-County community. Many senior citizen groups 
enjoy the Cosmetology services offered by these talented students. The students 
once again traveled to local senior centers to provide nail care to clients. Students 
in grade 9 were visited by male cosmetologists during their exploratory in order 
to introduce students to the many career pathways for males within the beauty 
industry. All students who sat for the Massachusetts Board of Cosmetology exam 
passed and are now employed in area salons. 



94 



Culinary Arts : Gerry's Place Restaurant and Bake Shop is open to the public for 
lunch during the school year. The take-out service continues to be a welcome 
addition. Tri-County staff takes advantage of this service, which allows the 
students to experience another aspect of the restaurant industry. Students in the 
Culinary Arts program achieved Serve Safe Certification as well as the standards 
set forth by the American Culinary Foundation. This past spring the Culinary 
Arts program successfully completed self-evaluation as well as a site visit for 
ongoing accreditation by the American Culinary Federation. 

Dental Assisting : The Dental Assisting Program is now in its third year with 
grades 9, 10 and 11 students practicing the skills necessary for a career in the 
dental field. Active participation by local representation of the dental field has 
led to a vibrant advisory board and generous support of the Massachusetts Dental 
Society. The students in Dental Assisting created effective teaching 
demonstrations for the preschool children in the Early Childhood Program again 
this past year. Students in the junior class achieved success in the first year of 
clinical practicum at local dental offices. 

Early Childhood Careers : Both the Preschool Program and Toddler Program 
continue to thrive. The ECC Program is recognized by the National Association 
of Young Children as one offering high quality education and care for young 
children. Students completed construction of a "natural" outdoor playground for 
the children enrolled in the preschool program. Students in the program also 
participated in an internship during the junior year in local child care centers and 
public kindergarten classrooms to expand their experiences working with young 
children. The Early Childhood graduates continue to pursue careers in the 
education field by obtaining positions at local full day private centers 
immediately upon graduation or attending a four year college in order to teach in 
public schools. 

Electrical : Students in the Electrical Shop gained experience in simulated 
residential and industrial application as well as live work in the Tri-County 
school building. The Electrical students continued to gain valuable training in 
renewable and sustainable technology by practicing installation and monitoring 
energy conservation at the photovoltaic PV system which was constructed last 
year on the Tri-County grounds. Students are preparing for the State Journeymen 
license examination as they successfully complete both the theoretical and shop 
aspects of the program. Students will accrue up to 300 hours of Electrical Code 
instruction and 1,500 hours of practical application toward their license 
requirements upon graduation. 

Electronics : Students in the Electronics Program have received much support 
from a major local computer company this past year including several 
cooperative education positions leading to employment after graduation. Many 
of our Electronics students chose to pursue higher education in the ever-evolving 

95 



technology field. Students in the Electronics program also participated in a pilot 
test for the PLTW Digital Electronics course. 

Engineering Technology : The Engineering Technology Program is now in its 
fifth year. Many of the graduates have been accepted to colleges in their pursuit 
of engineering degrees. In fact, one graduate will be attending MIT in September. 
The program continues to enjoy Project Lead the Way Certification. Subject 
matter includes significant course work in mathematics, physics, and other 
sciences. This past year, engineering students participated in the newly formed 
Robotics Club and competed in the Boston FIRST Robotics Competition held at 
Boston University in March. 

Facilities Management : Students in the Facilities Management Program gained 
skills in a variety of construction areas. Most students achieved welding 
certification before graduating from the Facilities Management Program. 
Students also gained experience by contributing to the maintenance of Tri- 
County's grounds. Facilities Management students replaced ceiling tiles, painted 
hallways and provided extensive landscape removal in the school. 

Graphic Communications : Students in the Graphic Communications Program 
gained experience as they provided design and printing services for Tri-County 
as well as for non-profit organizations in the surrounding communities. State-of- 
the-art technology in the graphics field, including a new 2-color press and screen 
printing machine purchased as part of a grant, are used to enable students to 
pursue many careers upon graduation from Tri-County. 

HVAC&R : Students are trained in all aspects of heating, cooling and ventilation 
of both residential and commercial buildings. Graduates from this shop are well 
prepared for high paying employment and further education. The HVAC 
students who complete 2,000 hours as a refrigeration apprentice and achieve a 
trade certificate upon graduation are able to sit for the Refrigeration Technician's 
license exam. 

Medical Careers : Medical Careers students continued to have 100% success in 
passing the Certified Nursing Assistant state examination at the end of their 
junior year. They also received Home Health Aide certification at the end of the 
senior year. All students in the program are trained in medical office technology 
skills as well as in basic healthcare knowledge. The skills gained enable them to 
pursue various health careers upon graduation. Tri-County formed a partnership 
with HMEA this past year in which students gained experience working with 
developmentally delayed young adults to further expand their opportunities in the 
health field. 

Plumbing : The Plumbing Program continued to grow this past year. Students 
were trained in the newest technology and plumbing materials and worked on 

96 



projects in the school and outside workforce through the Cooperative Education 
Program. An articulation agreement with the Plumbers and Pipe Fitters Local 
Union 4 will allow Plumbing students the opportunity for advanced placement in 
the apprenticeship training program. 

Continuing Education 

The Continuing Education Department at Tri-County offers both day and evening 
courses. The day program includes two Postsecondary programs, Cosmetology 
and Practical Nursing. The entire evening program consists of additional 
Cosmetology and Practical Nursing programs as well as 60 to 70 other course 
offerings. These programs serviced over 1900 students in the 2010 fiscal year. 
While the majority of adults served are from within the school district, we have 
students attending from as far away as Orange, Truro, Chelmsford and even 
Edgartown. Tri-County is now able to offer access to Federal Financial Aid in 
the form of Pell Grants to qualifying students in our Practical Nursing and Adult 
Cosmetology programs. This should improve community access to these 
programs through this need based support. 

Adult Day Cosmetology : Besides graduating 14 students in 2010, students were 
sent to compete in the national SkillsUSA competition in Kansas City. The 
Adult Day Cosmetology program is a full-time program that follows the high 
school calendar and runs from September to June. The students learned 
hairstyling, cutting, permanent waves, coloring, manicuring and skin care. This 
program provided students with the mandated 1,000 hours of schooling and 
prepared them to pass the State Board of Cosmetology's licensing exam. 

Evening Cosmetology : This year 8 students graduated from the Evening 
Cosmetology program. The program's curriculum mirrors the day program in 
content but is spread out in more sessions due to the limited hours at night. This 
program also provided its students with the 1,000 mandated hours and prepared 
the students to pass the licensing exam. 

Adult Day Practical Nursing : Graduating 28 students in 2010, the Practical 
Nursing Program continued to flourish. This year one of our students was 
honored as the Massachusetts Vocational Postsecondary Student of the Year by 
the Massachusetts Association of School Superintendents and the Massachusetts 
Association of Vocational Administrators. The Nursing Program also had a very 
successful year competing in SkillsUSA, sending several students to the national 
competition in Kansas City. This is a full-time day program which follows the 
high school calendar as classes are held from September through June. The 
Practical Nursing Program at Tri-County is designed to prepare graduates for the 
National Council Licensure Examination for Practical Nurses (NCLEX-PN), 
which tests for entry-level competency. Successful completion of this 
examination permits practice as a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN). Registration 
for this program requires that prospective students take the TEAS (Test of 

97 



Essential Academic Skills) exam. The pre-admission tests are administered from 
October to January. 

Adult Evening Practical Nursing : The evening Practical Nursing program is a 
part-time, two-year program. After successful completion of the course, the 
student will be eligible to sit for the NCLEX-PN examination for licensure. 
Successful completion of this examination permits practice as a Licensed 
Practical Nurse. The program graduated eight students in 2009, the very first 
graduating class from the evening Practical Nursing program, marking another 
significant milestone in Tri-County's history. The second graduating class is 
expected to complete the program in June, 201 1. 

Evening Adult Program : The evening Adult Education program at Tri-County 
consists of over 80 courses which are offered in the fall and spring semesters. 
Course offerings include 20 certificate or licensing programs as well as 15 
additional workforce training-specific programs. Tri-County's Continuing 
Education Program also offers a wide array of courses to introduce or expand 
computer-based skills including CISCO Networking and A+ Certification. 
Registration for fall courses takes place during August and September. 
Registration for spring courses takes place in January and February. Continuing 
Education course information can be found in brochures available to the public 
via direct mail and local newspapers. The evening program information is also 
included on the Tri-County RVTHS website at http://www.tri-county.tc , or by 
calling the Continuing Education office. 

Student Activities 

National Honor Society : The Peter H. Rickard Chapter of Tri-County is 
comprised of 13 seniors and 8 juniors. During the last school year, students 
participated in many fund-raising activities, including Pennies for Patients and 
Haiti Relief, as well as community service activities both in and out of school. 

On Tuesday, May 27th, the National Honor Society hosted the annual 
"Leadership Breakfast" honoring Tri-County students who have served in 
various leadership roles, both elected and appointed during the school year. 
Randi O'Hara of the Massachusetts Chapter of The Leukemia and Lymphoma 
Society attended as the special guest speaker, thanking the students for their 
participation in the Pennies for Patients Fundraiser. 

The school year culminated with Tri-County's nineteenth Honors Night held in 
the Kenneth Custy Gymnasium on June 2nd. 

Student Government 

Student Advisory Committee : The student body elected seven students to 
membership on the Student Advisory Committee. The principal appointed one of 
these elected members to report student concerns and activities to the Tri-County 

98 



School Committee each month; three students from this group sit on the Tri- 
County School Council; and three serve on the High Schools That Work Site 
Committee. These seven students also serve as ex officio members of the 
Student Council. The student body elected two students to represent Tri-County 
on the State Student Advisory Committee. These students met once a month 
with students from other schools in the Central Massachusetts region. 

Class Officers : The sophomore, junior and senior classes elected a President, 
Vice-President, Secretary, and Treasurer for their respective classes for next year. 
The incoming freshman class elected officers in January after the last 
exploratory. Under supervision of the Class Advisors, officers scheduled, 
organized and conducted monthly after-school meetings to plan activities which 
included the Freshman/Sophomore Semi-Formal, the Junior/Senior Prom and the 
Senior Week activities. The class officers heard and communicated students' 
ideas to the Student Advisory Committee, and also served as officio members of 
the Student Council. 

Student Council : Each class elected four representatives to the Student Council. 
These students, along with the class officers and Student Advisory Committee 
members, served as the overall student governing body committed to the 
principle of student government. The group met weekly after school, and 
advised the faculty. The Student Council served as a liaison between the student 
body and the school administration providing a means for student statement in 
school affairs. Under the supervision of the Student Council Advisors, this group 
was also accountable for conducting and ensuring fair elections for Class 
Officers, the Student Advisory Committee, and the at-large Student Council 
membership. The Student Council served as leaders for the student body, 
sponsoring and organizing social activities which included Freshman Orientation 
in August, followed by the Friday night activities for the Kick-Off Weekend, the 
first week the students returned to school in September. Student Council 
students assisted the Athletic Director in planning Homecoming in November 
and sponsored the many Spirit Week activities. In addition, the Student Council 
planned and coordinated civic, social, fundraising, and community service 
activities and acknowledged administrators and teachers throughout the school 
year. One of their accomplishments was coordinating a blood drive that 
successfully collected 50 units of blood, a school record. 

Extra Curricular Activities 

There are nine extra-curricular activities at Tri-County. These clubs provided 
students with after school opportunities to enjoy, perform and compete. Tri- 
County worked to provide a myriad of possibilities for all students during the 
extended week day and many weekends. Of these extra-curricular activities, the 
Drama Club performed The Popcorn Sonata and Cut, while the Math Club and 
the Robotics Club participated in interscholastic events. The Math Team took 
first place in the Massachusetts Vocational Mathematics League competition and 

99 



the Robotics Club placed eighth in their first ever Boston FIRST Robotics 
Competition. 

Summary 

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School is proud to provide a 
quality career education to the residents of its eleven member towns. Tri-County 
students are highly visible in our sending districts in a variety of roles. They 
serve as interns, summer employees, and cooperative education students and 
have completed a number of outside projects within our member communities. 
Each of these experiences assists our students in demonstrating what they have 
learned in their vocational programs. 

Vocational training is only part of our success. Academic preparation is noted 
through the growing number of scholarships acquired from local associations and 
organizations, as well as the increased number of students now attending college 
upon graduation. Tri-County continues to prepare students as good citizens and 
this is witnessed through the actions of individual accomplishment of students 
through the mandated community service graduation requirement, as well as 
community service projects organized through a number of extra-curricular 
organizations. Two major school-wide projects this year were the Annual 
Holiday Gift Drive and Support for Our Troops. 

Tri-County is your town's vocational technical school. Our goal is to prepare our 
students to be good citizens who serve their community. Many of the programs 
offered at Tri-County are available to the public and our service programs are 
open to residents. Our facilities continue to be available to town administrators 
for meeting use. 

Projects for member towns which were completed by Tri-County students 
included: Franklin, final installation of cabinets and provision of pastries for the 
opening of the Historical Society, Cosmetology students working with Horace 
Mann Middle School students, and collaboration for the forthcoming 
construction of the Beaver Street Bath House; Plainville, construction of a 
handicap ramp, stairs and interior cabinet and counteitop for the PAWS of 
PLAINVILLE community cat shelter; Millis, construction of a shed to be 
donated to the Millis Schools for a student garden project; Medfield, installation 
of an outdoor PA system for sports fields and an indoor PA system for the 
gymnasium; North Attleborough, construction of art horses for high school; as 
well as our Graphics Program providing printing services for several towns. 

Tri-County students also completed many projects located here at the school: 
Carpentry students completed the storage garage; students in Facilities 
Management painted their shop; Carpentry students renovated their shop's office 
area; Electrical students retrofitted lighting in the Auto Tech and Plumbing 
shops; Plumbing students replaced outdated valves and shutoffs and repaired 

100 



drinking fountains; Facilities Management students also replaced ceiling tiles and 
accomplished several landscaping projects. All of these undertakings were in 
addition to routine maintenance tasks. 

Tri-County lives by its mission statement, specifically in the charge to prepare 
tomorrow's workforce; to provide a solid academic foundation for further 
education; and to prepare good citizens. Over the past year, this mission 
statement continued to move from words on a page, to action. 



101 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



REPORT 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2010 



102 






REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

On behalf of the Medfield School Committee, I would like to thank the staff of 
the Medfield Public Schools for the extraordinary efforts in keeping the school 
system one of the best in the Commonwealth. By extension, since Massachusetts 
has routinely finished at the top of national education assessments, Medfield can 
accurately state that our schools are among the very best in the country. While 
our performance in state, national and international evaluations has consistently 
placed the district at the top, an equally important measure of our success as a 
school system is the widespread reporting from our recent graduates that a 
Medfield education has prepared them very well for the rigors of college 
academics. 

We are also pleased to report that our success as a school system is not limited to 
academics. In sports, the recent Dalton award recognized the exceptional 
performance of all of our athletic teams. This award, given yearly to the most 
accomplished sports program in each division, is a tribute to the hard work put in 
by our athletic director and his coaches as well as our athletes in Division II. 
Additionally, we are honored to have our jazz ensemble selected as one of the top 
three jazz bands in the country through its invitation to the Charles Mingus 
competition in New York City. More important than these awards and 
recognitions, the district's emphasis on participation in extracurricular activities 
enhances the community spirit evidenced when you walk down the corridors of 
our middle school and high school and speak to the students. 

Two areas of focus this past year deserve special recognition. Through your 
persistence and dedication, we have been recognized as a Confucius Classroom, 
an award given to just sixty schools in the country who have embraced the 
importance of introducing Chinese language and culture into their curriculum. 
The School Committee feels strongly that this development, as well as the 
continuing exchange with our sister school in Bengbu, will greatly enhance our 
students' ability to compete in the 21 st century economy. Secondly, while 
constricted to date by funding challenges, as a district we have spearheaded the 
initiative to take full advantage of the teaching and learning possibilities 
generated by the explosive advances in educational technology. While a multi- 
year sustained investment is necessary to fully realize the benefits of these new 
technologies, our Strategic Plan, as well as the investments we have made, have 
put us on a sound footing for moving forward. 

Equally deserving of our gratitude is the efficiency with which staff administers 
the school system. Our spending per pupil for fiscal year 2009 (the latest year 
available) was ranked in the bottom 13% of the school systems within the state. 

103 



This was achieved while maintaining a performance record based on MCAS 
testing which has placed us in the top 10% of school districts. Our per pupil 
expenditure, at 20% below the state average, is reflective of the fact that our 
system is lean and focuses on placing the maximum amount of resources toward 
education and not overhead. 

The most obvious result of this efficiency has been our ability to function within 
a budget which has increased by less than .5% in each of the past two years. 
Through the creativity of the leadership team, we are proud to be able to say that 
we have done so while experiencing an unprecedented reduction in state aid. For 
the first time in the Commonwealth's history, local aid will decrease for the third 
consecutive year in FY2012. While we have steadfastly maintained our 
educational program, standards, and class sizes, doing so has not been without 
compromise, particularly in the area of technology. Our proposed budget for 
FY2012 will need to address these issues or we will risk backtracking on the 
tremendous strides we have made in the past decade. It is the Committee's 
feeling that such a development would not only be a detriment to the students of 
Medfield Public Schools but also the homeowners of Medfield who have 
benefited from our deserved reputation as an educational leader in the 
Commonwealth. 

I would like to thank my fellow school committee members, Susan Ruzzo, 
Debbie Nochese, Chris Morrison and Susan Cotter. In particular, I'd like to 
recognize the efforts of Sue Cotter who is retiring after nine years on the School 
Committee. Sue's efforts, including her five years as a member of the School 
Planning and Building Committee overseeing the new high school/middle school 
complex and revitalized Memorial School, have made an invaluable contribution 
to the town and are greatly appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Timothy J. Bonfatti, Chair 

Medfield School Committee 



104 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Enrollment Figures 
As of October 1,2010 

Memorial School 

Kindergarten: 163 

Grade 1: 203 

Ralph Wheelock School 



Grade 2: 




194 


Grade 3 : 


Dale Street School 


214 


Grade 4: 




222 


Grade 5: 




232 



Thomas A. Blake Middle School 

Grade 6: 248 

Grade 7 256 

Grade 8: 218 

Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 

Grade 9: 240 

Grade 10: 235 

Grade 11: 226 

Grade 12: 236 

TOTAL: 2887 



105 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

To the Citizens of Medfield: 

I am pleased to submit the annual report for the Medfield Public Schools for the 
year 2010. 

The appropriated budget for FY2010 was $26,359,947. This figure represents an 
increase of 0.46% over the FY2009 appropriation. This is the second consecutive 
year in which the national and state economic downturn has resulted in a 
significant loss of state aid to the town. The school department has received and 
applied the funds from the federal government American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to partially offset this loss of state revenue. 

The October 1, 2010 enrollment was 2887 students. The enrollment by school 
was: Memorial School - 366, Wheelock School - 408, Dale Street School - 454, 
Blake Middle School - 722 and High School - 937. 

During the 2010-2011 school year we have continued to focus on the 
improvement of academic and extracurricular programs. We have continued to 
expand upon our partnership with the schools in Bengbu, China. This fall we 
hosted ten students and two teachers for a period of three weeks. As a result of 
our success in developing this innovative partnership we have been awarded a 
three year grant entitled the "Confucius Classroom Award" from the New York 
based Asia Society. In addition to providing significant funding the grant gives 
us national recognition for our model program. This year we were able to expand 
the Chinese language program into grade 7 at the middle school. In addition, we 
were pleased to receive news that our athletic programs received the Dalton 
Award for 2010 from the Boston Globe for the highest winning percentage of all 
Division 2 athletic programs in eastern Massachusetts. 

We continue to find that students are progressing at a high level based on 
performance data. The MCAS scores for our students continue to exceed the 
average scores of communities in Massachusetts. This is positive news because 
Massachusetts continues to be recognized nationally as the highest performing 
state in the country based on the National Assessment of Educational Progress 
testing program. 



106 



In closing, I would like to express my appreciation to all of the citizens of 
Medfield for their strong support of our educational programs. I would also like 
to extend my appreciation to all of the teachers, parents, support staff, 
administrators, school committee members and volunteers who continue to 
actively support our educational mission. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert C. Maguire 
Superintendent of Schools 



107 



MEDFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



STAFF DIRECTORY 



"k k "k k & 



Year Ending 12/31/10 



CENTRAL OFFICE 



Maguire, Robert, BA,MEd 
Kellner, Charles,BA,MBA 
Leader, Kathleen 
Bennotti, Beverly 
Davidson, Sandra 
Montillo, Phyllis 
Kavanaugh, Mary 
Shufro, Pamela, BA,MA,EdD 
Sullivan, Colleen 



Superintendent of Schools 
Director/ Finance & Operations 
Administrative Assistant to Superintendent 
Secretary to the Superintendent 
Accounts Payable/Bookkeeper 
Secretary to Dir/Finance & Operations 

Payroll Administrator 
Director, Curriculum & Assessment 
Mail Transfer 



108 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
A ppointment 



Noble. Judith 
Sperling. Jeffrey 

Nunes. Kathleen 



Ingram. Maryjean 
Boyer. Laura 
Kelly, Francine 
Alland. Emily 

Ballou. Katherine 



Batts. Maura 

Beardsley. Marianne 
Berry. Orla 

Blessineton. Patricia 



Interim Principal BS. University of NH 

MEd. Worcester State College 
Dn Students BS. Bridgewater State College 

MA. Lesley University 

MEd. Endicott College 
Dn Academics BA. Framingham State College 

MA. Boston College 

MEdAdmin. University of MA. Boston 
Secretary 
Secretary 
Secretary 
Social Studies 



Science 



For Lane 



Business 



Blum. Cynthia 


Science 


Boardman. Stephen 


Science 


Brown, Sarah 


English 


Bruemmer, Paul 


Foreign Lang 


Burr. Wendy 


Mathematics 


Cahill. Brian 


Science 


Cambridge. Jeff 


Wellness 


Chamberlain. Madeline 


English 


Cousens. James 


Art 



Coutinho. Paul 

Cowell, Susan 
Coyle. Adam 



BA. Western New England College 

MAT. Simmons College 

BS. Stonehill College" 

MEd. Boston College 

MEd. Endicott College 

BA, Middlebury College 

MEd. University of Massachusetts 

Library Assistant 

Science BS,USG,MEd, University of 

Massachusetts. Boston 
BS. California State. Long Beach 
MS. Cambridge College 
MEd. Cambridge College 
AA. Hartford College 
BS. MAT, Simmons College 
BS, University of Connecticut 
BA. Syracuse University 
MAT. Simmons College 
BA, St. Mary's University of MN 
MA, University of St. Thomas 
BS, University of Mass/ Amherst 
BS. Fairfield University 
MEd. Northeastern University 
BS. Bridgewater State College 
MEd. Endicott College 
BA. McGill University 
MAT. Tufts University 
BFA. University of Massachusetts. 

Dartmouth 
MEd. Fitchburg State College 
BS. Southern Connecticut State 

University 
MS. Northeastern University 
BS. Springfield College 
MEd, Cambridge College 
BA, George Washington University 



Wellness 



Family 

Consumer Sci 
Social Studies 



1974 



2005 



2001 



1999 
2000 
2010 
2007 

2004 



1993 

2010 
2004 

1998 

2008 

2008 
2009 

2001 

2007 
2010 

2007 

2008 

2006 

2002 

1984 
2006 



109 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Crane, Diane 


Foreign Lang 


BA, University of Maine 
MEd,Bndgewater State College 


2010 


Curmn, Jane 


Library TEC Assistant 


2004 


Cushing, Gerald 


Science 


BS, Lowell Technological Institute 
MS, Lehigh University 


2006 


DeSorgher, Richard 


Social Studies 


BA, University of Mass, Amherst 
MA. University of Mass, Boston 


1976 


DeVita, William 


Mathematics 


BA, North Adams State College 
MA, Clark University 


2009 


Drew, Meghan 


Art 


BA, Sacred Heart University 
MFA, Boston University 


2003 


Duffy, Gail 


English 


BA, Stonehill College 

MAT, Bridgewater State College 

MSPC, Clark University 


2001 


Dunn. Jonathan 


Mathematics 


BA, James Madison University 


2004 


Durdel, Jessica 


Social Studies 


BA, Siena College 
MS, College of St. Rose 


2007 


Emerson, Kathleen 


Social Studies 


BA, Providence College 
MAT, Simmons College 


2001 


Flanagan. Jacqueline 


Math 


BS, Boston University 
MS, Suffolk University 


1997 


Gait, Luanne 


Mathematics 


BA, Boston College 
MA, Cambridge College 


1999 


Garcia-Rangel, Mary 


English 


BA, University of MA, Boston 
MAT, Tufts University 


2000 


Gaudette, Ashleigh 


Science 


BA, Bridgewater State College 


2010 


Goodrow-Trach, Monique Foreign Lang 


BA,SUNY/Binghamton 


2004 






MST,SUNY/Plattsburg 




Hardy, Adele 


Consumer & 
Family Science 


BS, Framingham State College 


1981 


Hutsick, Maria 


Wellness, Ath 


BS, Ithaca College 


2007 




Trainer 


MS. Indiana University 




Ibrahim. Susan 


Foreign 


BS, Brown University 


2001 




Language 


MEd,Boston College 
MEd,Endicott College 




Irwin, Ross 


Mathematics 


BEd, Leeds University, England 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1992 


Jones, Katherine 


Art 


BFA, Massachusetts College of Art 
MEd, Framingham State College 


2003 


Kincaid, Garland 


Social Studies 


BA, University of Colorado 
MST, SUNY, Potsdam 


2007 


Kinch, Terry 


Science Tech/ 
Computers 


BS, SUNY at Brockport 


1994 


Kirby, Jonathan 


Wellness/AD 


BS, University of Bridgeport 
MS, Cambridge College 


1977 


Kraemer, Michael 


Mathematics 


BA, College of the Holy Cross 


1993 



Kramer, David 



Mathematics 



MAT, Bridgewater State College 
MME, Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
BS, BA, Georgetown University 
JD, Boston College Law School 



2004 



110 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
A ppointment 



Kryzanek, Carol 

Leaver. Kevin 
Letteiri. Colleen 
Lohan. Melinda 

Lyon. Diane 

Malchodi. Anne 
Mandosa. Frank 

McCrossan. Kathleen 
McDermott. Janet 

Morin. Donna 
Morin. Thomas 
Motley. Nancy 
Nickerson. Mark 

Nothnagel. Margo 

Olsen. Douglas 

Panciocco. John 

Perm, Mark 

Pratt. Suzanne 

Renaud. Karen 

Rodenhi. Sarah 

Sabra. Ann Marie 

Safer. Jessica 

Salka. Martin 
Sancher. Bethan 
Sawtelle. Gwynne 

Schmidt. Joanne 

Schultheis. Steve 
Seri. Leora 
Shapiro. Richard 



Science 



Foreign Lang 
English 
Social Studies 

Mathematics 

English 
English 



BA. Bridgevvater State College 
MA. University of Massachusetts 
BA. Bridgevvater State College 
BS, Assumption College 
BA. University of Massachusetts 
MA, University of Massachusetts 
BS, University of Massachusetts 
MEd. University of Mass/Lowell 
BA,MA. Boston College 
BA. St. Anselm College 
MEd. Cambridge College 

Library Assistant 

English BA. Regis College 

MAT, Boston College 

Foreign Lang BA. College of New Rochelle 

Social Studies BA, Colgate University 

Library Assistant 

Social Studies BA. Gettysburg College 

MEd. Framingham State College 

BA. Providence College 

MM. Westminster Choir College 

BAMusic, University of Massachusetts 

Masters. New England Conservatory 

BS. University of Maine 

MEd. Cambridge College 

BA, Mt. Ida College 

MEd. Harvard University 

BS, University of Massachusetts 

MS. Central Connecticut State College 

BS. Rhode Island State College 

MEd. Fitchburg State College 

BA, Bowdein College 

Masters. Middlebury College 

BA, Worcester State College 

MEd, Framingham State College 

BA. Assumption College 

MEd, Cambridge College 

Permanent Substitute Lunchroom Assistant 



Choral 

Dir of Music 

Soc Studies, TV 

Social Studies 

Science 

Wellness 

Foreign Lang 
(LOA) 
English 

Mathematics 



English 
English 

Librarian 



Science 



For Lang 



Science 



BA. Brigham Young University 

BA. Dickinson College 

MAT, Simmons College 

BS, Framingham State College 

MLS. Simmons College 

MA. Emerson College 

BA, Williams College 

MS. Long Island University 

BA, Bates College 

MA.Middleboro College 

BS, Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

MS, Northeastern University' 



1988 

2009 

2010 
2006 

2006 

2010 
2002 

2005 

1971 

2003 
2005 
2006 

1995 

2010 

1993 

1998 

2001 

1971 

2008 

2000 

1995 

2002 

2002 
2007 
2007 

2000 

2008 
2006 
1981 



111 



Name 



Position 





Medfield 


Education 


Appointment 


BFA, Massachusetts College of 


1996 


Art 




BA, Framingham State 


1970 


MIaI. Cambridge College 




BA. Boston College 


2002 


BA, Connecticut College 


2002 


MEd, Harvard University 






2008 


BA, University of Kentucky 


2006 


MAT, Boston University 




BA, MAT Bridgewater State College 


1996 


BA, Stonehill College 


2009 


BME, University of Missouri 


2010 


MM, Boston University 




BA, Boston University 


2003 


MAT, Simmons College 





Shiff. M.iin 

Stockbridge, Gmj 

Tasi, Tncj 
Toubman. Ellen 

Walsh, Jeannie 
\\ iese, Elizabeth 

\\ oods, Jane 
Woods, Thomas 
Woodworth, Sharon 



Art 

Social Studies 

Foreign Lang 
Foreign Lang 

Library Assistant 
English 

Mathematics 
Soc Studies/ Art 
Orchestra 



Wren-Burgess, Bonnie English 



112 



THOMAS A. BLAKE MIDDLE SCHOOL 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Med fie Id 
A ppointment 



Parga. Robert 



Vaughn, Nathaniel 



Principal 



Dean of Students 



BA. California State University 
MEd. Azusa Pacific University 
CAGS. Salem State College 
BA. Trinity College 
MEd. Lesley College 
MOM. Endicott College 



2007 



1998 



McHugh. Elizabeth 


Secretary 




1998 


Skerry, Sharon 


Secretary 




2001 


O'Shaughnessy. Andrea 


Secretary 




2006 


Adams. Kathryn 


Library Assistant 




2008 


Avers. Sandra 


English 


BS. MEd. Boston State College 


1995 


Bracken. Kenneth 


Physical Education 


BS.Westfield State 


1997 


Bradley. Laura 


Reading 


BS. MEd. Bridgewater State 
MEd. Salem State College 


2007 


Buckham. Eileen 


Foreign Language 


BA.MAT. Boston University 


2006 


Caprio. Kathleen 


English 


BS. MS. Southern Connecticut 
State University 


2007 


Cohen. Wendy 


Science 


BS. Simmons College 


1988 


Dalpe. Cynthia 


Foreign Language 


BA. Worcester State College 
MEd. Cambridge College 


1986 


Delaney. Christina 


Art 


BFA. Massachusetts College of Art 2005 






MEd.Lesley University 




Dengos. Kelly 


Science 


BA.MA. Marist College 


2005 


Dexter. Ryan 


Music Band 


Bachelor of Music, University 

of Massachusetts 
MA. Framingham State College 


2000 


Doolan. Constance 


Mathematics 


BS, Bradley University 
MEd. Cambridge College 


2004 


Farrell. Kara 


Mathematics 


BA Bridgewater State College 
MEd.University of Massachusetts 


2010 


Farroba. Joseph 


HealthPE 


BS. Boston State College 
MEd. Cambridge College 


1978 


Gagne. Ian 


English 


BS. Boston University 
MFA. National University 


2000 


Gantos. Alex 


Science 


BFA. Tufts University 
MAT. Simmons College 


2006 


Gavaghan. Brian 


English 


BA. St. Anselm College 


2007 


Gibbs. Michael 


Science 


BS. Worcester Polytechnic 
Institute 


2007 


Gonzalez. Heather 


Foreign Language 


BA, Oberlin College 

MA. Framingham State College 


2004 


Gow, Michael 


Social Studies 


BS, University of Wisconsin 
MAT. Bridgewater State College 


2001 


Graseck, Elise 


English 


BS, Lesley University 


2008 


Guarino. Veronique 


Foreign Language 


BA, University of Mass/Amherst 
of Education 


2004 



13 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
A ppointment 



Gumas, Marissa 


Mathematics 


H.itchcll. Melissa 


Mathematics 


1 \a\ cock. Jonathan 


Librarian 


Heim, Jason 


Science 


lk-im. \larjorie 


Science 


Hellerstein, Seth 


Social Studies 


Jalkut. Maryann 


Rdng/Soc Studies 


Kearney. Erin 


Mathematics 


Kirby, Ann 


Mathematics 


Kirby. Krister) 


English 


Manning. Deborah 


Social Studies 


Manning, Kristin 


Foreign Language 


McConnell, Ellen 


English 


McLaughlin, Nancy 


Mathematics 


Meaney, Donna 


Technology Assistant 


McClelland, Cynthia 


Social Studies 


Millard, Matthew 


Mathematics 


Moran, Jill 


Music 


Muscatell, Gina 


Science 


Nixon, Sarah 


Library Assistant 


O'Corcora, Eoin 


Information Technology 


O'Neil, Joyce 


Physical Education 


Porter-Fahey, Loretta 


Health Education 


Quinones, Daniella 


Spanish 


Russell, Ellen 


Technology Assistant 


Silva, Judith 


Science 


Sperling, Keri 


Mathematics 


Sullivan, John 


Social Studies 


Sullivan, Wendy 


Technology Assistant 


Taliaferro, Travis 


Social Studies 


Tasker, Geraldine 


Social Studies 


Walker, Doris 


English 


Winter, Erin 


English 


Zaia, Diane 


Science 



BA, Arcadia College 
MEd, Lesley University 
BS, Bowling Green State 

University 
MA, Ashland University 
BS, MEd, Boston University 
BS, SUNY, Albany 
MAT, Simmons College 
BA,MEd, University of MA 
BA, Beloit College 
MA, University of VT 
CAS, Trinity College, VT 
BS, Framingham State College 
BS, Northeastern University 
BA, MEd, Boston College 
BA, James Madison University 
MEd, Lesley University 
BA, Hamilton College 
MEd, Lesley University 
BA, University of Vermont 
MAT, Quinnipiac College 
BA, Marymount College 
MA, Northeastern University 
BS, Valparaiso University 
MS, Simmons College 

BA, Bridgewater State College 
BS, Gordon College 
BS, University of Connecticut 
BS, Worcester State College 

Administrator 
BS, University of Wisconsin 
BS, University of Maine 
MS, Cambridge College 
BA, Loyola Marymount 

University 
MA, Emerson College 

BA, University of Rhode Island 
BA, Bridgewater State College 
MEd, Lesley University 
MEd, Lesley University 
BS,MA, Northeastern University 

BA,MEd, Plymouth State College 
BA, Our Lady of the Elms College 
MEd, Lesley College 
BA, University of Maine 
MAT, Bridgewater State College 
BA, Framingham State 
AS, Westbrook College 
BS, Northeastern University 
MS, University of Rhode Island 



2001 



2009 



1998 
2002 



2006 
1999 



1987 
2007 
2003 
2009 

2002 

2003 

1992 

2009 

1993 
2010 
2005 
2007 
2007 
2006 
2008 
1993 
1980 

2010 



2001 
2006 
2000 



2004 
2002 
2001 
1986 

1987 

2007 
1995 



114 



DALE STREET SCHOOL 



Medfield 



Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Cave. Kim 


Principal 


BS, Framingham State 

MEd, University of New England 


1987 


Moon, Martha 


Secretary 




1992 


Englehardt, Nancy 


Secretary 




1997 


Altimar, Amanda 


Grade 4 


BS,MAT,Sacred Heart 
University 


2010 


Belmont. Katherine 


Grade 4 


BS, Framingham State College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1971 


Burnham. Elizabeth 


Grade 4 


BA, University of Maine 
MAT, Simmons College 


1999 


Callahan, Christina 


Reading Specialist 


BA, Stonehill College 

MEd, Bridgewater State College 


2008 


Carey, Pauline 


Health 


BS, Springfield College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1992 


Cowell, Kerry 


Grade 4 


BA, Bridgewater State College 
MA, University of Mass/Boston 


2002 


Crable, Heidi 


Grade 4 


BS, University of Maine 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1994 


Curran. Kathleen 


Grade 5 


BS, University of Mass/Amherst 
MBA. Northeastern University 


2000 


Deveno, Nancy 


Art 


BSAE, Mass. College of Art 
MSAE,Mass. College of Art 


1993 


Douglas, Michael 


Grade 4 


BS, Stonehill College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1995 


Flynn, Suzanne 


Grade 4 


BA. Merrimack College 

MEd, Framingham State College 


2006 


Fromen, Deborah 


Technology Assistant 




2001 


Hayes, Margot 


Grade 4 


BA, Bridgewater State College 


2007 


Kosmo, Kathryn 


Grade 5 


BS, Salem State College 
MAT, Regis College 


2008 


Kristof, Ann 


Grade 4 


BS, Framingham State College 


1974 


Lowerre, Julie 


Grade 5 


BS, Indiana State University 


2004 


Mason, Michael 


Grade 5 


BS, Northeastern University 


1989 






MEd, Bridgewater State University 


McKechnie. Claire 


Grade 5 


BA. Boston College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1977 


McNeil, Laurie 


Math Intervention Spec 


AS, Massasoit College 

BS/BA . Northeastern University 

MEd,Bridgewater State College 


2008 


Miller, Denise 


Grade 5 


BA. University of Massachusetts 
MEd, Lesley University 


2008 


Nawrocki, Mairi 


Physical Education 


BS. Boston University 

MS, Bridgewater State College 


2001 


Olson. Janice 


Grade 4 


BS, Boston State College 
MEd. Cambridge College 


1973 


O'Rourke, JoAnn 


Lunchroom Assistant 




2005 


Oxholm, Barbara 


Music 


BM, University of Lowell 

MM, New England Conservatory 


1999 


Pastore. Marissa 


Grade 5 


BA. Emmanuel College 
MEd,Northeastern University 


2010 


Pendleton, Anne 


Reading 


MA, University of Southern Maine 1995 






MEd, University of Lowell 




Pope, William 


Physical Education 


Associate, Dean College 
BS, Springfield College 


1977 


Rudnick, Barbara 


Lunchroom Assistant 




2008 


Sager, Bethany 


Grade 5 


BA, Mount Holyoke College 
MEd, Framingham State College 


1996 


Scharlacken, Darla 


Librarian 


BA, Texas A & M University 
MEd, Bridgewater State College 
MLS, University of Rhode Island 


2009 


Thornton, Maria 


Library Assistant 




2004 


Walunas, Kathy 


Grade 5 


BA, Boston College 
MEd, Cambridge College 


1991 


White, Joseph 


Grade 5 


BS, Northeastern University 
MEd. Universit) of Massachusetts 


1992 


Woodman, Susan 


Grade 5 


BA, Boston University 

115 


1993 



RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
A ppointment 



Allen, Patricia 


Principal 


Naughton, Karen 
Monahan, Luanne 
Apples ard, Cynthia 


Secretary 
Secretary 
Grade 2 


Balaidini. Stacey 


Grade 2 


Callahan. Jamee 
Carey, Ann 
Donahue. Sarah 


K-5 ELA/SS ConSpec 
Grade 2 
Grade 3 


Dowd, Emily 


Grade 3 


Duffy, Jean 


Reading 


Feig, Maureen 


Grade 2 


Fine. Madeline 


Art 


Frewald, Dorothy 
Grant. Ann 
Gregory, Janis 
Hevey, Sarah 


Technology Assistant 
Grade 2 

Cafeteria Monitor 
Grade 3 


Interrante. Janice 
Kuehl, James 


Grade 3 
Grade 3 


Landfield, Nancy 
Leonard, Joan 


Mathematics Assistant 
Grade 2 


Lynn, Rachel 


Grade 3 


McElhenny, Caren 
Morris, Regina 
Murphy, Sarah 


Lib/Mathematics Assis 
Grade 2 
Grade 2 


Myers, Judith 


Reading 


Newton, Debra 


Grade 3 


Nunziato, Grace 


Lunchroom Assistant 


Osbom, Jennifer 


Grade 2 


Parmenter, Dorothy 


Music 


Sheehan, Nicole 


Grade 3 


Slason, Michael 
Steinhardt, Alana 


Physical Education 
Librarian 


Stevens, Nicholas 


Physical Education 


Trikoulis, Deborah 
Watson, Erin 


Grade 3 
Grade 3 



BS, Westfield State College 
MEd, Wheelock College 
CAGS, Emmanuel College 



2004 



1985 
2002 
2005 



2006 



2008 



BA, University of Vermont 

MA, Lesley University 

BA, Providence College 

MS, Wheelock College 

BS,MEd,Framingham State 

BSEd, Framingham State College 1 97 1 

BA,UMass,Amherst 2010 

MAT, Simmons College 

BS, Plymouth State University 2006 

MEd, Framingham State College 

BS, Boston College 2006 

MEd, Rutgers University 

CAGS, Bridgewater State University 

BA, Fairfield University 2008 

MAT, Regis College 

BA, University of Massachusetts 2001 

MSAE, Mass College of Art & Design 

1993 
BA, University of Massachusetts 1993 



2010 



BA, Merrimack College 
MEd, Lesley University 
BA, Marywood University 
BA, University of Arizona 
MA, Simmons College 



2007 



1986 
1997 



2010 
2002 



BA, Boston College 
MEd, Lesley University 
BS, North Adams State College 1 997 
M,SpecEd, Framingham State College 
t 2006 

BS, MEd, Framingham State 
BS, MS,Framingham State 

College 
BA, Clark University 
MS, Long Island University 
BA, MEd, University of New 

Hampshire 



1976 
2006 



1998 



1996 



2009 
2007 



BA, Roger Williams University 
MEd,Framingham State College 
BA, Marymount College 
MEd, Lesley University 
BSEd,Bridgewater State College 
MSEd, Wheelock College 
BA, New Mexico Highlands Univ 
BS, Boston University College 

Of Communication 
MLS, Simmons College 
BS. Springfield College 
MEd, Cambridge College 
BA, MAT, Quinnipiac University 
BA, University of New Hampshire 1995 
MEd, Lesley University 



1978 



1994 



1986 
2010 



1995 



2006 



116 



MEMORIAL SCHOOL 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Trasher, Andrea 


Principal 


BSBusAdmin. Northeastern 

University 
MEd. Bridgewater State College 


1994 






Administrator Certification. Northeastern 






University 




Driscoll, Marcia 


Secretary 




1989 


Policella. Lynn 


Secretary 




1998 


Colantoni, Juliana 


Grade 1 


BS. Wheelock College 
MEd, Lesley University 


1991 


Cooney, Susan 


Reading 


BA. Tufts University 
MBA. Simmons College 
MS, Wheelock College 


2001 


Crowell. Deirdre 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Elrick. Stefanie 


Grade 1 


BA, Assumption College 
MA, Simmons College 


2003 


Estes. Kimberly 


Teacher Assistant 




2001 


Grace, Herbert 


Physical Education 


BS. Keene State College 
MA, Cambridge College 


1992 


Grace. Paula 


Grade 1 


BS, Westfield State College 
MEd. Lesley University 


2007 


Graham, Karen 


Physical Education 


BS, Boston University 


1993 


Green, Susan 


Kindergarten 


BA, University of Massachusetts 


1991 


Groden, Randie 


Librarian 


BA, University of Maryland 
MLS, Rutgers University 


2001 


Guilbert. Alison 


Grade 1 


BS. University of VT 
MEd, Lesley University 


2001 


Hedberg, Marie 


Kindergarten 


BA. Boston College 
MEd. Lesley University 


1999 


Herring, Heather 


Grade 1 


BA, Assumption College 
MA, Lesley University 


2001 


Johnson. Janet 


Teacher Assistant 




2007 


Jones, Deborah 


Teacher Assistant 




1999 


Kirk. Laura 


Teacher Assistant 




2008 


Knott, Donna 


Library Assistant 




2009 


McAvoy, Susan 


Kindergarten 


BS, MS, Framingham State 
College 


2000 


McNicholas. Maura 


Teacher Assistant 




1998 


Mulock. Louise 


Teacher Assistant 




2000 


Nicholson, Margaret 


Grade 1 


BA, Newton College of the 
Sacred Heart 
MEd. Lesley University 


1978 


Nickerson, Jeninne 


Kindergarten 


BS, Bridgewater State 


1998 


O'Brien, Teri 


Instructional Technolo 


gy BA, National College of the 


1984 



O'Connor. Annie 


Art 


O'Connor-Fischer 


Teacher Assistant 


Oppel. Heidi 


Teacher Assistant 


Paget, Christine 


Grade 1 


Pendergast. Marie 


Grade 1 


Pollock. Allison 


Grade 1 


Ravinski, Kathleen 


Grade 1 


Reardon, Suzanne 


Reading Assistant 


Ruggiero, David 


Music 


Singer. Laura 


Reading 



Sacred Heart 
MEd, Northeastern University 
MEEdS. Simmons College 
BFA. Massachusetts College of 

Art and Design 



BS, Framingham State College 
MEd. Lesley University 
BA, University of Mass/Boston 
MEd, University of Mass/Boston 
MSpEd.Framingham State College 
BA, University of Vermont 
MEd. Lesley University 
BA. Wheaton College 
MAT. Simmons College 

BS, Bryant College 
MEd, Lesley University 
BS. St. Bonaventure University 
MS. University of Bridgeport 



2009 

2003 
1998 
1990 

1998 



1992 
2001 



2002 
2002 



1990 



117 



PUPIL SERVICES 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


La< ava, Matthew 


Director 


BA, Providence College 

MEd, University of Massachusetts 


2010 


Lowd, Diane 


Secretary 




1998 


Mitchell. Kim 


Secretary 




2000 


Birkett. Janet 


Secretary 




2000 


Moores, Andrea 


Secretary 




2004 


Allen, June 


Teacher Assistant 




2008 


Allen, Tracy 


Guidance 


BA, Vassar College 
MA, Boston College 


2004 


Andrews, Gillian 


Teacher Assistant 




2007 


Anelauskas, Mary 


Teacher Assistant 




1998 


Armstrong, Ka> la 


Teacher Assistant 


2010 


Bennett. Linda 


Learning Specialist 


BA, University of Massachusetts 
MEd, Cambridge College 


2007 


Bernard, Michele 


Teacher Assistant 




2008 


Biedrzycki, Kathleen 


Teacher Assistant 




2006 


Bimey, Edith 


Special Education 
Teacher Assistant 


BA,William Smith College 


2010 


Bockhorst, Kathleen 


Guidance 


BA, Bates College 
MA, Boston College 


2004 


Bosh, Maryellen 


Psychologist 


BA, St. Anselm College 
MA, Tufts University 


1998 


Bra\ erman, Nancy 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Brown, Judith 


Teacher Assistant 




1992 


Chen, Joy 


Occupational Therapist 


BA, Oberlin College 
MS, Boston University 


1994 


Chlebda, Kanee 


Teacher Assistant 




2006 


Collins, Kate 


Teacher Assistant 




2007 


Connelly. Janet 


Nurse 


BSN, St. Anselm College 


2006 


Connor, Donna 


Teacher Assistant 




2007 


Corey, Suzanne 


Teacher Assistant 




2005 


DeCorte, Crystal 


Teacher Assistant 




2010 


DeGeorge, Sally 


Integrated Preschool 


BS,SUNY/Genesco 
MSEd, Boston College 


2004 


Domeshek, Carol Ann 


Teacher Assistant 




2007 


Foley, Marie 


Guidance 


BS, Curry College 

MEd, University of Massachusetts 

Endicott College 
CAGS, University of Mass,Bostor 


2005 

i 


Frauenberger, Gretchen 


School Physician 






Frazier, Kimberly 


Teacher Assistant 




2007 


Fuglestad, Joanne 


Teacher Assistant 


1999 


Giammarco, Nancy 


Inclusion Coordinator 


BA,MEd, CAGS, University of 


2009 



Massachusetts/Boston 
Gordon, Beverly Learning Specialist BA, Pottsdam State University 

MSEd, The College of St. Rose 



1993 



118 



Name 



Position 



Education 



Medfield 
Appointment 



Graham, Patricia 
Guglietta, Maureen 
Hamilton, Susan 

Heafitz. Michael 

Home, Allison 
Imbrogna, Ann 

Jacomme, Cori 

Johnson. Susan 



Karg. Cynthia 
Kendall. John 
Kevorkian, Eric 
Krah, Kerrie 

Lavelle, Patricia 

LaRose, Kristin 
Lassoff, Anna 



Lodge, Anne 

Lucash, Seth 
Mandosa. Heather 



Marenghi, Matthew 



Martlin, Jean 
McClure, Barbara 

Mileszko, Diana 
Muir, Connie 
Mullen, Patricia 



Murphy, Marcia 

O'Neil, Kathleen 
Ormbeg, Erik 

O'Sullivan, Barbara 
O'Sullivan, Mary 



Teacher Assistant 
Teacher Assistant 
Learning Specialist 

Learning Specialist 

Teacher Assistant 
Integrated Kindergarten 
Learning Specialist 
Psychology 

Learning Specialist 



Teacher Assistant 
Teacher Assistant 
Teacher Assistant 
Speech/Language 

Speech/ Language 

Teacher Assistant 
Inclusion Coordinator 



Guidance 



Teacher Assistant 
Guidance 



Guidance 



Teacher Assistant 
Learning Specialist 

Teacher Assistant 
Teacher Assistant 
Learning Specialist 
Inclusion Coordinator 

Learning Spec 

Bus Monitor 
Guidance 

Teacher Assistant 
Learning Specialist 



BA, Colgate University 
MEd, Framingham State College 
BA, Connecticut College 
MEd, Boston College 

BS, North Adams State College 
MEd, Bridgewater State College 
BS, University of Washington 
MS, University of Rhode Island 
BA, Northwestern University 
MEd, Boston University 
JD, Suffolk University 



BS, Marquette University 
Master of Arts, Hofstra University 
BA, Marywood College 
MEd, Northeastern University 

BA, Clark University 
MA,EdD, George Washington 

University 
BA, College of the Holy Cross 
MEd, Boston University 

BA, St. Anslem College 
MEd, Cambridge College 
CAGS, Boston University 
BA, University of Massachusetts/ 

Lowell 
MEd, Boston University 

AS.BS, Fashion Institute of Tech 
MA, Simmons College 



BA, Stonehill College 
MEd, Framingham State College 
CAGS, Bridgewater State College 
BA, Westfield State College 
MEd, Framingham State College 

BS, Ithaca College 
MEd, Suffolk University 

BA, Providence College 

MA, Framingham State College 



2008 
1987 
2003 

2007 

2010 
2005 

2005 

2002 



2006 
2008 
2008 
2000 

1994 

2010 
2010 



2007 



2010 
2001 



2002 



2010 
2008 

2010 
1992 
2001 



2005 



2010 
1998 



2002 
2002 



119 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Patch, Mary 


Nurse 


BSN, University of Wisconsin 


1995 


Pern . Kim 


Psychologist 


BS, University of Illinois 


2008 






MA, PhD, University of Rhode Island 


Preikszas, Mary 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Frostburg State College 
MEd, Framingham State College 


1996 


Pugatch, Dine 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Boston University 
MS, Ed, Lesley College 


1995 


Radford. Kathy 


Teacher Assistant 




2007 


Read, Susan 


Teacher Assistant 




2004 


Ricck), Julia 


Speech/Language 


BA, Bates College 


2000 






MS, Teachers College, Columbia Univ. 


Robinson, Judith 


Co-Director, Out of 


AB, Boston University 


2010 




District Coordinator 


Masters, Newton College of 
the Sacred Heart 




Sailer, Lisa 


Guidance 


BS, James Madison University 
MA, Boston College 


2007 


Salamone, Mary 


Learning Specialist 


BS, Wheelock College 
MEd, Cambridge College 
EdS, Simmons College 


1995 


Scheld, Nancy 


Teacher Assistant 




1997 


Schiemer, Nancy 


Nurse 


BSN, University of Bridgeport 
MA, New York University 


2003 


Singer, Margaret 


Occupational Therapist 


BA, SUNY/Oneonta 
MA, Adelphi University 
MS, Boston University 


1998 


Smith, Noreen 


Teacher Assistant 




2009 


Snyder, Trinka 


Psychologist 


BA, MEd, University of 
Pennsylvania 


2002 






MBA, George Washington University 






CAGS, University of Massachusetts 


Sockol, Dawn 


Co-Director, Out of 


BA,MEd, Michigan State Univ, 


2010 



District Coordinator 
Speroni, Richard Teacher Assistant 

Strekalovsky, Elisabeth Psychologist 



Sullivan. Barbara 

Sullivan, Brianna 
Thomas. Annie 
Thompson, Kathleen 

Tilden. Susan 

Triest. Sherry 
Typadis, Angela 

Vancura, Dorothy 



Learning Specialist 

Teacher Assistant 
Teacher Assistant 
Nurse 

Speech/Language 

Teacher Assistant 
Integrated Preschool 

Speech/Language 



CAGS, Rhode Island College 

BA, Middlebury College 
MEd. Lesley University 
MEd, CAGS, University of MA 
BS, Framingham State College 
MEd, Boston State College 



BS, Salem State College 
MS, Boston College 
BA, Boston College 
MA, Michigan State 

BA, Stonehill College 

MEd, Bridgewater State College 

BA, Bridgewater State College 

MS, Southern Connecticut State College 



2000 
1998 



1995 

2010 
2003 
1997 

2005 

2002 
1989 

2007 



120 









Medfield 


Name 


Position 


Education 


Appointment 


Villone, Nancy 


Teacher Assistant 




2005 


Wardner, Lori 


Teacher Assistant 




2010 


West, Nina 


Teacher Assistant 




2009 


Williams, Patricia 


Nurse 


BSN, Boston College 
MBA, Virginia Polytech 


2006 


Worthlcy, Stephanie 


Guidance 


BS, MEd, Springfield College 
MEd, Endicott College 


2006 


Zappula, MaryEllen 


Nurse 


BSN, Salve Regina University 


2005 


Zrike, Sara 


Teacher Assistant 




1999 


Zurawka, Mary 


Teacher Assistant 




2010 



121 



FOOD SERVICES 



Mintzer, Richard 

Miller, Terry 

Anderson, Ruth 

Brown, Angela 

Clark, Heather 

David, Denise 

DeRoche, Nancy 

Evans, Sandra (Manager) 

Hart, Tina 

Heidke, Darlene 

Hill, Mary 

Hogan, Michelle 

Hoyt, Maria 

Jones, Christina (Manager) 

Konevich, Stephanie (Manager) 

LaPlante, Laurie (Manager) 

Manning, Linda 

McCarthy, Hazel 

McCarthy, Nancy 

Mullen, Joanne 

Nelson, Carol (Manager) 

O'Brien, Sharon 



Food Services Director 
Food Services Secretary 
High School 
High School 
High School 
Ralph Wheelock School 
High School 
Dale Street School 
High School 
Blake Middle School 
Ralph Wheelock School 
Dale Street School 
Ralph Wheelock School 
Blake Middle School 
Memorial School 
Ralph Wheelock School 
Blake Middle School 
Memorial School 
Dale Street School 
Blake Middle School 
High School 
Dale Street School 



122 



PLANT MANAGEMENT 



Bernard Spillane 

Bond, Robert 

Burke, Stephen 

Burton, Linda 

Butler, Shawn 

Ciccketti, Richard 

Frazier, Matthew 

Glassman, Barry 

Hayes, Ronald 

Hinkley, Paul 

Howland, George (Head Custodian) 

Jackson, Michael 

Johnson, Donald (Head Custodian) 

Johnson, Michael (Head Custodian) 

Johnson, Ronald 

Kadehjian, Robert (Head Custodian) 

Martin, Henry 

Mulkern, Thomas 

Murphy, Brian 

Murray, Jeffrey 

Nicolazzo, Anthony 

Norian, Paul(Head) 

Quayle, Thomas 

Rogers, Thomas 

Vogel, Keith 

Volpicelli, Brian 



Director 

Maintenance 

Dale Street 

Blake Middle School 

High School 

Blake Middle School 

Blake Middle School 

Maintenance 

High School 

Central Office 

Memorial School 

Maintenance 

High School 

Dale Street School 

Memorial School 

Blake Middle School 

Dale Street School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

High School 

Blake Middle School 

High School 

Ralph Wheelock School 

Maintenance 

Memorial School 

High School 

Ralph Wheelock School 



123 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND OPERATIONS 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I am pleased to submit to you and the citizens of Medfield the 2010 Annual 
Report of the Director of Finance and Operations. Despite the national and 
international financial problems from which we have not been immune, I remain 
confident that the fiscal and operational components of the Medfield Public 
Schools are well-positioned to continue to contribute to the ongoing excellence 
of the system. 

In the area of building maintenance, the School Committee and District 
Administration continued to address the capital improvement and maintenance 
needs of the facilities. Funds are budgeted and expended annually to continue 
the process of replacing flooring, classroom furniture and repainting interior 
spaces as needed. Amongst the projects completed in 2010 were the replacement 
of countertops and backsplashes in the high school art rooms, painting the 
gymnasium and replacement of the clock/intercom system in the Blake Middle 
School, replacement of the countertops in the main office and nurse's room and 
rehabilitation of the interior courtyard at the Wheelock School, replacement of 
the ramp from the playground to the modular classroom building at the Dale 
Street School and repair of the kitchen floor at the Memorial School. 

With cooperation from individuals throughout the District and utilizing the 
efforts and expertise of the Medfield Energy Committee and its members, we 
maintained our focus on energy usage in all of our facilities. We continue to 
experience success in mitigating the impact of the dramatic spike in energy cost. 
To quantify the results we have attained through our efforts, across our five 
facilities our energy use decreased by approximately 18% when comparing fiscal 
year 2010 to 2008. The efforts and accomplishments of the Medfield Public 
Schools and the Town of Medfield were recognized by Mass Save (an initiative 
sponsored by Massachusetts gas and electric utilities and energy efficiency 
service providers). We are proud to have been one of twelve Mid-Sized/Large 
Businesses award winners in the state. Amongst the projects accomplished 
which assisted us in achieving these results were the installation of emergency 
lighting controls at the high school and Memorial School as well as the 
installation of power factor correction units at the high school. We were able to 
secure a significant amount of incentive funding through the electric utility to 
enable us to afford these projects. In addition, we replaced two additional single- 
paned windows at the Dale Street School. 

The five-year capital budget is updated annually. This planning and management 
tool provides a systematic analysis of the capital needs of the system and its 
facilities. The capital plan continues to focus primarily on the Dale Street and 

124 



Wheelock Schools, and attempts to provide a realistic assessment of our building 
and maintenance requirements within the context of fiscal realities. Through this 
process it has become clear that in order to provide an appropriate learning 
environment while concurrently preserving our financial resources, it is 
important that we replace the single-paned windows at these buildings. This has 
become increasingly important given the rapid rise in energy costs. We were 
able to obtain a capital budget appropriation to continue this project in 2010; we 
have ordered replacement windows for four (4) additional classrooms at Dale 
Street and expect that they will be delivered and installed in the early part of 
calendar year 201 1. We expect to seek funding for additional windows during the 
next few years to complete this needed project. We also received an 
appropriation for funds to replace a maintenance department vehicle, however 
the availability of vehicles being replaced by the Fire and Public Works 
Departments have enabled us to defer this purchase for a year. 

Our school lunch program continues to provide appropriate and healthy meals to 
our students. Director of Food Services Rich Mintzer continues to take the 
initiative in determining our customers' preferences in menu options while 
continuing to provide nutritionally-balanced meals. Rich remained actively 
involved with the District's Wellness Committee which was established to 
undertake a comprehensive examination of the nutritional quality of school 
meals, promotion of physical activity, nutrition education and staff wellness. We 
strive to continue to enhance our successful program while maintaining its 
financial viability, which operates distinctly from the appropriated budget. In an 
effort to improve our customer focus, we continue to investigate options for the 
provision of cashless payment systems for our cafeterias. 

The budget process in 2010 culminated in the adoption of a budget for the 
Medfield Public Schools of $26,359,947. This represents an increase of 
$120,000 or 0.46% over the sum provided the previous year. This represents the 
second consecutive year in which the budget increase for the Medfield Public 
Schools was less than Vi of 1%. We were able to accomplish this by prudently 
managing the school department budget of the prior fiscal year which enabled us 
to reallocate state special education grant funds to soften the impact of the 
continued state aid reductions FY in 2011. The School Committee elected to 
utilize its share of federal stimulus funds (from the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act) over a two year period (FY2010 and 2011) to minimize 
dramatic swings in funding availability. While we are responding to these 
uncertainties, we continue to focus on addressing the District's needs while 
maintaining excellence. 

In closing, I would like to express my sincere appreciation to my co-workers and 
staff for their continued exemplary assistance. I would also be remiss were I not 
to recognize the efforts of my former Secretary, Anna Floser, who retired during 

125 



2010 after 27 years of service to the Medfield Public Schools, and to welcome 
Phyllis Montillo who assumed those duties in the fall. I look forward with 
confidence to addressing the opportunities and meeting the challenges which lie 
ahead. 



Respectfully submitted. 



Charles L. Kellner 

Director of Finance and Operations 



126 



REPORT OF THE AMOS CLARK KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As the principal of Amos Clark Kingsbury High School, I respectfully and 
proudly submit this annual report for the school year ending December 31, 2010. 

The official enrollment for the high school as of October 1, 2010 was 937. There 
were 212 graduates in the Class of 2010. Ninety-four percent of the graduating 
class went on to college. Included among the colleges these students are 
attending are Bates College, Boston College, Bowdoin College, Cornell 
University, Harvard University, Simmons College, New England Conservatory 
of Music, Smith College, University of Notre Dame and Wentworth Institute of 
Technology. During their time in high school, 69 members of the graduating 
class were inducted into the National Honor Society. 

On graduation day, three members of the senior class shared their thoughts with 
family, friends and fellow graduates. Honor Essayist, David Jensen, spoke about 
maintaining integrity and learning from mistakes. Fellow Honor Essayist, Lee 
Abecunas, talked to everyone about graduation and commencement ironically 
being two words for the same event. He also talked about the potential of the 
graduates to change the world around them. Senior speaker, Laura Sullivan, 
enticed the audience with a delicious dialogue about high school experiences. 
During the Class Day exercises on Friday, June 4, Ambassador Donald E. Booth, 
Class of 1972, was honored as the Hall of Excellence recipient for 2010. 
Ambassador Booth is presently posted in Ethiopia. He was recognized as an 
outstanding graduate of Medfield High who has made significant contributions to 
his community and country. Retiring members of the faculty, Teresa Wroten and 
Suzanne Pratt, were also honored at Class Day. Ms. Wroten had ten years of 
service at MHS and Mrs. Pratt had served the community for thirty-nine years. 
Meg Drew was the recipient of the student-determined "Inspiration Award'' 
supplied by the Medfield High School Boosters. Earlier in the year, English 
teacher, Miranda Whitmore, received the Goldin Foundation Award for 
Excellence in Education. This award recognizes educators for their outstanding 
achievements and contributions to classrooms, schools and communities. 

Three members of the Class of 2010 were named as National Merit Scholarship 
finalists. David Jensen, Katie Karg and Savannah Pidcock were chosen as part of 
this prestigious group as a result of their 2009 PSAT scores. Nine students were 
recognized as commended scholars. Lee Abecunas, Brian Brown, Alisha Cerel, 
Anne Marie Crowell, Morganne Gagne, Joe Hill, Stephen Hiltz, Georgia 
Naumann, and Lauren Russell placed in the top 5% of more than 1.4 million 
students who entered the competition. These students received a certificate of 
achievement from the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. 

127 



Results on national and state testing continue to be exemplary. Scores well above 
the national averages prevail on the SAT testing. One hundred eighty students 
took three hundred and eighteen Advanced Placement exams in sixteen subjects. 
Sixty-seven percent of the students scored either a four or five on these exams. 
On the Massachusetts ELA MCAS, 97% of MHS sophomores were within the 
advanced and proficient categories. On the math MCAS, 99% of our students 
scored either advanced or proficient. Both of these values are well above the 
state average. 

Early in 2010, the report from NEASC (New England Association of Schools 
and Colleges) reflecting the findings of a 2009 visitation was released. We are 
pleased that the NEASC report recognized the areas of excellence we take so 
much pride in and we will take steps to address the report's recommendations. 
The report expressed that the school climate is safe, positive, respectful and 
supportive and that students demonstrate a sense of pride and ownership. 
Recommendations included implementing a plan to replace, update and provide 
technology for the twenty-first century and a need to develop indicators for our 
school-wide civic and social expectations. 

Our visual and fine arts programs continue to excel. The 2010 Boston Globe 
Scholastic Art Awards were held in February with three seniors receiving Gold 
Key awards. They were Julia Phillips, Emma Rosenfeld, and Laura Sullivan. 
Additionally, eleven students received Honorable Mentions. Ten student 
musicians participated in the All-Star District music festival in January. 
Representing MHS were seniors, Keith Curbow, Noh Kung Park, and David 
Jensen, as well as several underclassmen. In May, members of the music 
department travelled to Toronto, Canada to compete in a festival. The concert 
band was "number one" out of the 39 groups who competed and the jazz 
ensemble was "number one" out of 15 ensembles. 

Important events also transpired in the athletic arena. Many varsity teams 
qualified for post season tournament play throughout the year. Impressively, 
three high school teams won state championships this year. Boys' lacrosse, girls' 
soccer, and girls' volleyball all won in their divisions. (See more details in the 
report of the Director of Athletics.) 

In the spring, the Theatre Society made "Children of Eden" a true audience 
pleaser. Numbering well over 100 students, the cast, crew and pit orchestra 
worked together to create a truly memorable show. In the fall, the group 
produced "First Lady", to the delight of appreciative audiences. 

Foreign travel continues to be a part of the high school experience for several of 
our students. Last spring one group of MHS students travelled to Spain and 
another to England. These were culminating activities for studies in Spanish and 

128 



British literature, respectively. In September, ten Chinese students and two 
teachers joined us for two weeks of culture sharing and language immersion. 
The last part of the process will take place when some of our students will 
venture to China next fall. 

Professional development goals for faculty continue to focus on common 
assessment work. Teachers of common courses are focusing on establishing 
learning targets that highlight the significant content. As we look to the future, 
we are committed to establishing more time for collaboration across the 
curriculum. We will continue with technology procurement and training for all. 
In addition, we continue to work to meet the social and emotional needs of all our 
students and to honor the outstanding work of our students and faculty. 

As the Principal of Medfield High School, I am extremely pleased with the many 
achievements of our students and faculty. On behalf of the Medfield High 
School community, I would like to thank the school committee, the 
superintendent of schools, the Medfield High School Boosters, the Medfield 
Coalition for Public Education, and the many parents and community members 
for their continued support of our programs and our students. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Judith E. Noble 
Principal 



129 



Commencement 
Exercises of 

MEDFIELD 
HIGH SCHOOL 




The Amos Clark 

Kingsbury High School 

Class of 2010 

Sunday, June 6, 2010 

2:00 P.M. 
Medneld High School 



130 



Mcdlickt 

High 

School 



CLASS OF 2010 OFFICERS 

Daniel Murby, President 
Michael Cotter, Vice President 

Abigail Horan, Secretary 

Hayley Mandeville, Treasurer 

Keith Curbow, Representative to the School Committee 

Ms. Melinda Lohan 

Ms. Elizabeth Wiese 

Class Advisors 



ADMINISTRATION 

Robert C. Maguire, Superintendent 

Kathleen McArdle, Assistant Superintendent for Pupil Services 

Judith E. Noble, Principal 

Kathleen Xunes, Dean of Academics 

Jeffrey D. Sperling, Dean of Students 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Susan C. Cotter, Chairperson 

Timothy J. Bonfatti 

Christopher M. Morrison 

Debra M. Noschese 

Susan L. Ruzzo 



131 



High ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ 
School 

GRADUATION PROGRAM 

PROCESSIONAL Medfield High School Band 

NATIONAL ANTHEM NohKyungPark 

OPENING REMARKS Robert C. Maguire 

Superintendent of Schools 

WELCOME Daniel Murby 

President, Class of 2010 

HONOR ESSAYISTS David Jensen, Lee Abecunas 

MESSAGE TO THE CLASS OF 2010 Susan C. Cotter 

Chairperson, Medfield School Committee 

SENIOR SPEAKER Laura Sullivan 

MESSAGE FROM THE PRINCIPAL Judith E. Noble 

PRESENTATION OF CLASS GIFT Hayley Mandeville 

Treasurer, Class of 2010 

PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS* 

Susan C. Cotter Medfield School Committee 

Robert C. Maguire Superintendent of Schools 

Judith E. Noble Principal 

RECESSIONAL Medfield High School Band 

*PLEASE REFRAIN FROM APPLAUSE UNTIL ALL 
GRADUATES HAVE RECEIVED THEIR DIPLOMAS 



132 



^^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ High 

School 

AWARDS 

PRESENTED AT SENIOR RECOGNITION NIGHT 

June 3, 2010 

Daughters of the American Revolution Citizenship Award Alisha Cerel 

Rohert C. Byrd Scholarship Nomination Brian Brown 

NASSP Principal's Leadership Award Lindsey Smith 

Massachusetts Secondary School Administrators Award Michael Cotter 

National Merit Commended Scholars Lee Abecunas, Brian Brown, Alisha Cerel, 

Anne Marie Crowell, Morganne Gagne, Joseph Hill, 
Stephen Hiltz, Georgia Naumann, Lauren Russell 

National Merit Finalists David Jensen, Katherine Karg, Savannah Pidcock 

Academic Excellence Awards Lee Abecunas, Brian Brown, Jeffrey Brown, 

Alisha Cerel, Stephanie Chung, Michael Cotter, Allison Crowell, 

Anne Marie Crowell, Keith Curbow, Morganne Gagne, Joseph Hill, 

David Jensen, Katherine Jordan, Katherine Karg, Bryn Loeffler, 

Stephanie Nearhos, Savannah Pidcock, Lauren Russell, 

Christine Stamer, Laura Sullivan, Grace Thole 

SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS 

Medfield High School Scholar/Athlete Awards Jeffrey Brown, 

Morganne Gagne, Joseph Hill 

Medfield Ladies Spring Tennis Scholarships Russell Epstein, Nicole Paraboschi 

Medfield Sportsmen Clubs Harry S. Sonnenberg Scholarship Alexandra Connors 

Lamp of Learning Awards Katherine Karg, Stephanie Nearhos, Laura Sullivan 

National Honor Society Scholarships Lee Abecunas, Morganne Gagne, Joseph Hill, 

Allison Hunter, Daniel Murby, Nicole Paraboschi 

Medfield Teachers Association Book Awards Rhiannon Andrews, Alisha Cerel, 

Patrick Keleher, Elizabeth Mozer 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarships Alisha Cerel, Rebecca Patt 

Margaret T. Jenkins Memorial Scholarship Victoria Stevens 

Thomas Family Dental Associates Scholarship Grace Thole 

Medfield School Boosters Community Service Award Maria Jose Luna 

Medfield School Boosters School Spirit Scholarships Stephen Hiltz, Holly Oppel 



133 



High ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS (contmued) 

Medfield School Boosters Excellence Award Morganne Gagne 

Medfield Fitness Association Scholarship Awards Jeffrey Brown, Allison Hunter 

Peter Kennedy Memorial Scholarship Phillip DeSeignora 

Medfield Youth Basketball Association 

Bob Porack Memorial Scholarships Marissa Pelosi, Matthew Robinson 

Prudential Page Realty Scholarship in Memory of Roger C. Rao George Dexter 

Medfield Lions Club Scholarships Elena Faltas, Maria Jose Luna 

Medfield Employers and Merchants Organization Scholarships Keith Bennett, 

Maureen LaCerda, Amanda Roddy 

American Legion Women's Auxiliary Scholarship Rhiannon Andrews 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 110 Scholarships.... Angela Bodozian, Lindsay Ross 

American Legion, Beckwith Post No. 110 Medals Ashford Burgess, Logan Thomas 

Sons of the Legion Scholarships Angela Bodozian, Tia DiNatale 

Sons of the Legion, in Memory of Michael Morgan Scholarship Robin Higgins 

Medfield Youth Baseball/Softball Scholarships Christopher Warren, 

Carrie Quadir, Corey Quadir 

Medfield High School Theatre Society Scholarships Sarah Bibel, Timothy Bridge, 

Jordan Cohen, Hannah Erb, Nicolette Moses, 
Michael Norton, Randi Pallis, Juliana Small 

Daniel C. Palermo Spirit of Drama Scholarships Eric Epstein, Lauren Russell 

David E. Medeiros Theatre Society Memorial Scholarship Elie Maalouf 

Medfield Soccer, Inc. Scholarships Morganne Gagne, Katherine Jordan, 

Catherine Kelly 

Student Council Award Scholarships Mary Maloney, John McDermott 

Student Council Unsung Leadership Awards Phillip DeSeignora, Alissa Falcone 

Medfield High School Community Teens Scholarships Anne Marie Crowell, 

Elena Faltas, Abigail Horan, Christine Stamer 

Paul Quatromoni Memorial Scholarship David Jensen 

Friends of the Library Amy Fiske Creative Writing Scholarship Lauren Russell 

Middlesex Savings Bank Scholarship Grace White 

Medfield Music Association Scholarships Noh Kyung Park, Ella Pittman 

Lowell Mason Music Education Scholarship Keith Curbow 



134 



Medfield 

nigh 



SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS continued) 

Jeanne M. McCormick Music Award Matthew Stavrakas 

Christopher Naughton Memorial Scholarship Keith Curbow 

William Palumbo Baseball Scholarships Phillip DeSeignora, Korey Kuzmich 

Medfield Police Daniel McCarthy Memorial Scholarship TiaDiNatale 

Medfield Police Detective Robert E. Naughton Memorial Scholarship.... Angela Bodozian 

Rockland Trust Charitable Foundation Scholarship Thomas Vieira 

Hannah Adams Woman's Club Scholarships Anne Marie Crowell, Morganne Gagne 

Hannah Adams/Cecile Levesque Memorial Scholarship Ana Ghazi 

Medfield Permanent Firefighters Association Scholarships Angela Bodozian, 

TiaDiNatale, David McCann, Katelyn Thornton 
Medfield Firefighters Mutual Relief 
Association Scholarships Timothy Lynch, Lindsay Ross 

Eric Michael Perkins Football Scholarship Korey Kuzmich 

Medfield Youth Hockey Doug Woodruff Scholarship Alyssa Allen 

Peter Panciocco Youth Hockey Scholarship Alison Cronin 

Don Brown Youth Hockey Scholarships Bryn Loeffler, Caroline Thomas 

The Thomas Awards Alyssa Allen, Alison Cronin, Bryn Loeffler, 

Caroline Thomas, Catherine Warren 

Larry Dunn Memorial Scholarship Catherine Kelly 

David Gibbs Scholarship Alexandra Ridley 

Medfield High School Reunion Committee Scholarship, 

In Memory of Elaine Rawding Taylor Susan Herlihy 

Metro West Community Health Care Foundation Scholarship Savannah Pidcock 

Medfield Historical Society Scholarship Erin Monahan 

Medfield High School Alumni Association Scholarship John McDermott 

Medfield Youth Lacrosse Scholarships Edwin Foster, Kyle Foster, Abigail Horan, 

Hayley Mandeville, John McDermott, Jacqueline Zlevor 

Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz Scholarship Allison Crowell 

Rhododendron Needlers Quilt Guild Scholarship Julia Phillips 

Medfield Coalition for Public Education Scholarship Keith Curbow 

Milford Region Medical Center Scholarship Lee Abecunas 

Medfield TV Award David Chatterton 

All American Volunteer Award Eliza Lewis 



135 



Mciltield 
High 

School 



CUSS OF 2010 SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 



Siena College Mission Scholarship and Franciscan Scholarship Kaitlyn Buscone 

I muTsitv of Dayton Dean's Merit Scholarship & Adele Scholarship Chelsea Carpenito 

University of Pittsburgh Academic Scholarship Jordan Cohen 

Stevens Institute of Technology Edwin A. Stevens Scholarship Phillip DeSeignora 

Stevens Institute of Technology Presidential Scholar Award Phillip DeSeignora 

Roger Williams University Grant Caitlin Fisher 

Wentworth Institute of Technology Merit Award Scholarship TYler Frasca 

St. Lawrence University Sesquicentennial Scholarship Abigail Horan 

University of Miami-University Scholarship Katherine Jordan 

National Merit Scholarship Katherine Karg 

Eckerd College Presidential Academic Achievement Scholarship Jenna Levine 

Siena College Presidential Scholarship Timothy Lynch 

Oklahoma City University Dance Scholarship & Tuition Waiver Award Alexandra McCurdy 

Tufts University Grant John McDermott 

Regis College Alumni Sponsor Award & the Anniversary Scholarship Erin Monahan 

Tulane University Distinguished Scholar Award Nicolette Moses 

Mount Holyoke College Leadership Award Ella Pittman 

Emmanuel College Trustee Award Daniel Richman 

WPI Marshall/Chavez/Means Scholarship Iliana Schulman 

Ithaca College Park Scholar Award Lindsey Smith 

Clemson University Out-of-State Academic Scholarship Christine Stamer 

New England Conservatory of Music Merit Award Matthew Stavrakas 

American International College Presidential Scholarship Brian Wheeler 

Wheelock College Merit Scholarship Jacqueline Thomas 



136 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ High 

School 

CLASS DAY AWARDS 
PRESENTED ON JUNE 4, 2010 

ART: 

Excellence in Visual Arts Awards Sarah Bibel, Abigail Horan, Ryan McGrory 

Scholastic Art Awards Christine Bellotti, Abigail Horan, Mary Maloney, Ryan McGrory; 

Nicole Paraboschi, Julia Phillips, Emma Rosenfeld, Laura Sullivan 

Susan A. Parker Photography Award Mary Maloney 

ENGLISH: 

English Award Michael Cotter 

Journalism Lindsey Smith 

Shakespeare Award Michael Norton 

Yearbook Christine Stamer 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE: 

French Codi Dugas, Maria Jose Luna 

Spanish Rebecca Patt 

National Latin Exam: 

Latin I, Maxima Cum Laude Conor Beath, John Joseph 

Latin I, Cum Laude Phillip DeSeignora, Tia DiNatale, Tyler Frasca, 

Katharine Nixon, Michael Norton, William Shields 

Latin I, Magna Cum Laude Caitlin Fisher, Robin Higgins, Hayley Mandeville, Alexandra Sosinsky 

Latin III, Cum Laude Marc Green 

Latin III, Magna Cum Laude Jennifer Nelson 

Excellence in Language Michael Cotter 

MATHEMATICS: 

American Math Invitational Morganne Gagne, Joseph Hill, TianyangXian 

American Math Competition Morganne Gagne, Joseph Hill, TianyangXian 

Excellence in Math Anne Marie Crowell, Morganne Gagne, Joseph Hill 

New England Math League Joseph Hill, Logan Thomas 

MUSIC: 

John Philip Sousa Band Awards Allison Hunter, Daniel Murby 

Louis Armstrong Awards Keith Curbow, Matthew Stavrakas 

National Choral Awards Grant Botchers, Eliza Lewis 

National Orchestra Awards Bryn Loeffler, Ella Pittman 

SCIENCE: 

Biology Nicolette Moses 

Chemistry Anne Marie Crowell 

Physics David Jensen 

Environmental Science Christopher Lowell 

Anatomy & Physiology Chelsea Carpenito 

Society of Women Engineers Anne Marie Crowell, Morganne Gagne, Emma Rosenfeld 

SOCIAL STUDIES: 

Social Studies Award Brian Brown 

Gary Stockbridge Global Citizenship Award Alissa Falcone 

WELLNESS: 

Outstanding Participation Peter Bethoney, Rebecca Patt 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT: Kaylin Beauregard. Olivia Biagetti. Alisha Orel. Michael Cotter. 

Anne Marie Crowell, Keith Curbow, Kirsten Fraser, Morganne Gagne, Nell Goddard. Abigail Horan. l-lie Maalouf. 
Mary Maloney, Hayley Mandeville, John McDermott, Daniel Murby, Holly Oppel. Nicole Paraboschi 



137 



Mcdtielcl 

High 
School 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES - CUSS OF 2010 



•LEE DANIEL ABECUNAS 
Q IRTIS (AMES Mil LAR 

U.VSSA BERKSFORD ALLEN 
RH1AWON LYNN ANDREWS 
•COREY CHRISTOPHER ANGELUS 
! ENN1FERKATHER1NE \NTON 
JOHN CHRISTOPHER AUDY 
JOHN BRUCE BARBEE 
CRAIG ARTHUR BARDELLI 
CONOR PAUL BEATH 
KAYUN MARGUERITE BEAUREGARD 
CHRISTINE LYNNE BELL0TT1 
KEITH CUSHMAN BENNETT 
NICHOLAS Rl SSELL BERRY 
MICHAEL HARRY BERSHAD 
JEREMY TAYLOR BERWALDT 
PETER THOMAS BETHONEY 
SARASWAT1 BHANDARI 

* OLIVIA FLORA BIAGETTI 
SARAH ELIZABETH BIBEL 
MATTHEW EDWARD BLETZER 
ANGELA JOY BODOZLAN 
GRANT MACDONALD BORCHERS 
MITCHELL ARON BOVARNICK 
TIMOTHY MICHAEL BRIDGE 
BRIAN CHRISTOPHER BROWN 

* JEFFREY .ALEXANDER BROWN 
ASHFORD MACINTOSH LOUS BURGESS 
KAITLYN ELIZABETH BUSCONE 
EMILY CATHERINE BUSWELL 

* ROBERT J.AMES CALLAGHAN, JR. 
CHELSEA JOYCE CARPENITO 

* ALISHA STANLEE CEREL 
DAVID PROULX CHATTERTON 

* STEPHANIE CATHERINE CHUNG 
ALEXANDER EDISON CHURCH 

•JORDAN FAYE COHEN 
ALEXANDRA JEAN CONNORS 
JEANNE KAORU COOKE 

* MICHAEL FRANKLIN COTTER 
ALISON ANN CRONIN 

* ALLISON LEE CROWELL 

* ANNE MARIE CROWELL 

* KEITH WILLIAM CURBOW 
MICHAEL BRETT DAVIDSON 
ALEXANDER .ARTHUR DAVIES 
ANDREW PHILLIP DEANGELIS 

* PHILLIP ANTHONY DESEIGNORA 
GEORGE OWEN DEXTER 
MELODY ELIZABETH DICLEMENTE 
TLA LEANNE DINATALE 
GREGORY WILLIAM DONALDSON 
SHANNON ARLENE DONNELLY 
LUKE JAMES DONOVAN 

REBEKA BUBLITZ DOS SANTOS 
NICHOLAS JAMES DRAGOTAKES 



CODI ELIZABETH DUGAS 

AMANDA ELISE DUROCHER 

ERIC M.ARK EPSTEIN 

RUSSELL JOHN EPSTEIN 

HAWAII ELIZABETH ERB 

ALISSA CLAIRE FALCONE 

ELENA MAY MACH FALTAS 

OLIVIA DIANNE FARO 

m LA VICTORIA FE1NBERG 

RACHEL MARIE FERULLO 

CAITLIN RUSCONI FISHER 

EDWIN .ALEXANDER FOSTER 

KYLE JACOB FOSTER 

JILL ELYSE FRANKENTHALER 
; TYLER MICHAEL FRASCA 
: KIRSTEN ASHLEY FRASER 

TAYLOR HENDRICKS FREEMAN 

SCOTT RICHARD FRIEDMAN 
: CRAIG ANDREW FUGLESTAD 

MORGANNEJEANGAGNE 

DAVID STEWART GEDAROVTCH 

GEORGE CHRISTIAN GERSUK 

ANA JANET GHAZI 
: NELL O'BRIEN GODDARD 

MARC EVAN GREEN 

NICOLAS EDWARD GROFF 

JEFFREY CHAD GUAGL1ARDO 

SUSAN ELIZABETH HERL1HY 

COLLIN DANIEL HERN 

STEPHEN KENNETH HEYWOOD 

ROBIN NICOLE HIGGINS 

JOSEPH MERIDAN HILL 

STEPHEN RALPH HILTZ 
: ABIG.AIL PAIGE HORAN 

LAUREN ANN HOSTOVSKT 
: ALLISON LEE HUNTER 

ALEXANDRA KATHLEEN J.AMES 
: DAVID CARL JENSEN 
' KATHERINE ELIZABETH JORDAN 

JOHN PATHIKULANGARA JOSEPH 
! KATHERINE MARY KARG 

PATRICK JAMES KELEHER 
: CATHERINE JANE KELLY 

MEGAN MARIE KILEY 

KOREY PAUL KUZMICH 
: MAUREEN BRIANA LACERDA 

LAUREN CATHERINE LANNAN 

SAMANTHA .ASHLEY LAVOIE 

ALLYSON HOANG O.ANH LE-BRUNO 

JENNA DAWN LEV INE 

JESSICA NICOLE LEVINE 

ELIZA BORDLEY LEWIS 

ERIK MICHAEL LINDGREN 
: BRYN JEANNETTE LOEFFLER 

KATHRYN MARIE LOUTTIT 
: CHRISTOPHER SCOTT LOWELL 



138 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES - CLASS OF 2010 



Medfidd 

High 
School 



ZOE RUTH KING LUFT 
ANNA MARIE LUHRMANN 

* MARIA JOSE UNA 
ANISIA ALLEN LUNDBERG 

* KIRKLEY FINLAY LUTTMAN 
TIMOTHY GEORGE LYNCH 
MATTHEW PAUL LYONS 

* ELIE ANDRE MAALOUF 

* MARY SHEA MALONEY 

* HAYLEY MARIE MANDEY1LLE 

* JOSEPH PETER MARTO 
DAVID WALTER MCCANN 
ERIN COLLEEN MCCORMICK 
ALEXANDRA ELAINE MCCURDY 

* JOHN RICHARD MCDERMOTT 
RYAN JAMES MCGRORY 
JESSICA ANNE MCLEOD 
EDWARD MICHAEL MCSHANE 
CHRISTOPHER RICHARD MELVIN 
ERIN ELIZABETH MONAHAN 

* NICOLETTE GRACE MOSES 
ELIZABETH MARY-CARROLL MOZER 

* DANIEL EDWARD MURBY 
PAIGE MARIE MURRAY 
DANIEL JOSEPH MYGAN 
GEORGIA CLAIRE NAUMANN 

* STEPHANIE MARIE O'KEEFE XEARHOS 
♦JENNIFER PELLAND NELSON 

DANIEL THOMAS NTCKERSON 

* KATHARINE .ALLEN NIXON 

* MADYSON MARY NOONAN 

* MICHAEL EDWARD NORTON 
ANDREW JOSEPH NUGENT 
EMILY BEATRIZ O'CONNELL 

* HOLLY ANN OPPEL 
STEPHANIE KAY ORSWELL 

* SARAH ELIZABETH O'SHAl GHNESSY 
*RANDIJOPALLIS 

VINCENT LAWRENCE PALUMBO 

* NICOLE HEATHER PARABOSCHI 
NOH BfUNG PARK 

* EMILY STRAW PARSONS 
REBECCA JAYNEPATT 
MARISSA ANN PELOSI 
LAURA AMBER PETRONE 
JULIA RIELLE PHILLIPS 

* SAVANNAH LEIGH PIDCOCK 
ALEXA ELENA PINCLVRO 

* ELL\ MARIAH PITTMAN 
MIKAYLA ELIZABETH POCHEBIT 



RACHEL ALYSSA-LEIGH PL'DER 
CARRIE ASMA QL'ADIR 
COREY JAHANQUADIR 
MADISON LINDSEY REIFF 
DANIEL MCCARTHY RICHMAN 
ALEXANDRA ROBERTA NICOLE RIDLEY 
MATTHEW ADAM RINES 
KERRY ELIZABETH RIPP 

* MATTHEW LUKE ROBINSON 
JOHN BROPHY ROBITAILLE 
AMANDA CLAIRE RODDY 

* EMMA LOUISE ROSENFELD 
LINDSAY ANN ROSS 

* LAUREN MARIE RUSSELL 
LAUREN JEAN SANFILIPPO 
CATHERINE LUCIA SAURO 
JAY DAVID SAVAGE 
CAROLINE ELIZABETH SCANNELL 
MADELAINE JO SCHNEIDER 

* ILIANA JEANNE MARIE SCHULMAN 
WILLLAM KIRK SHIELDS 

JOHN FREDERICK SIINO 
MARGARET CLAIRE MCKENNA SLINEY 

* IULLANA LAUREN SMALL 

* LINDSEY ALEXANDRA SMITH 
ALEXANDRA ZOIE SOSINSKY 
KEVIN GREGORY SOL IE 

* CHRISTINE MARGARET STAMER 
MATTHEW ROBERT STAVRAKAS 
SCOTT KENNEDY STEEVER 
VICTORIA JANE STEVENS 
JAMES PATRICK SULLIVAN 

* LAURA ELIZABETH SULLIVAN 
SAMUEL DOUGLAS TAPLEY 

* GRACE JESSICA THOLE 

* CAROLINE SULLIVAN THOMAS 

* JACQUELINE ANN THOMAS 
LOGAN ALEXANDER THOMAS 
NATHANIEL WILLIAM THOMPSON 
KATELYN ELIZABETH THORNTON 
COLEMAN PATRICK TOOMEY 

* THOMAS MICHAEL VTEIRA 
KATHERINE MARY Y10LETTE 
CATHERINE FRANCES WARREN 
CHRISTOPHER MATTHEW WARREN- 
BRIAN DONALD WHEELER 
GRACE KATHRYN ROSE WHITE 
ERIN ELIZABETH WHOOLEY 
TLANYANG XIAN 

JACQUELINE MACCORMACK ZLEVOR 
VICTORL\ ROSE ZOPPO 



MARSHALLS. 



'NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 



STEPHEN KRAWTC. President 

MATTHEW BURCHILL Vice-President 
CLASS OF 2011 
■RECOGNIZED FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE 



139 




MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL CIRCA 1887 




AMOS CLARK KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 1961 - 2005 




MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 
2005-Present 



140 



REPORT OF THE THOMAS A. BLAKE MIDDLE SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

On behalf of the Thomas A. Blake Middle School, it is my pleasure to submit 
this Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 2010. The following 
paragraphs highlight the many accomplishments that took place at Blake during 
the past year: 

CURRICULUM 

At Blake, our staff continued to work hard to provide an engaging and 
stimulating classroom environment. Teachers worked together to create new 
units of study and also refined existing units to allow for skill development and 
content acquisition. In August, wireless technology was installed throughout the 
building which allowed our staff the ability to utilize more technology in the 
classroom. For example, our 7 th grade students now participate in a science lab 
where computers are accessible on a one-to-one basis. Teachers utilized the 
SmartBoards and InFocus projectors to enhance their instructional delivery. 
SmartBoard clickers were used in 8 th grade science this past year which allowed 
teachers to collect student feedback instantly. In social studies, our students 
often used Google Earth which allows for better geographical understanding. 
Also in 2010, the staff worked hard to create common assessments which helped 
to provide all students with a more consistent manner in which content was 
delivered and assessed. 

As we look for different ways to enhance our instruction, we welcomed several 
speakers and presenters in 2010. These included writer Mick Cochrane, author 
of the all-school summer reading novel, The Girl Who Threw Butterflies. Our 8 th 
grade career day activities were highlighted by a keynote address by renowned 
cardiologist, Dr. John Cadigan. Our 6 th grade students were treated to 
Shakespeare Now's performance of A Midsummer Night's Dream as well as a 
visit from the Boston Museum of Science's mobile unit. Other highlights 
included Groupo Fantasia and La Pinata, two performances hosted by our 
Foreign Language Department. 

Our teachers also scheduled a number of field trips that gave our students an 
opportunity to learn outside the traditional classroom environment. A few 
highlights included our 7 th graders spending a week at the Nature's Classroom 
facility in Lake George, New York and a trip to the North Shore Theater to watch 
the Charles Dickens classic, A Christmas Carol. Our 8 th graders started the 
school year by taking a bike trip through the various historical sites in Medfield 
and concluded with a canoe trip down the Charles River. Last spring, the 8 th 
graders ended their middle school experience with an exciting trip to 
Washington, D.C. 

141 



MCAS - Our Spring 2010 MCAS scores were exceptional once again. The 
following table includes scores for Blake compared to the state. These are the 
percentages of students in the Advanced/Proficient categories: 



Grade 


BMS 
ELA 


State 
ELA 


BMS 
Math 


State 
Math 


BMS 
Sci 


State Sci 


6 


85% 


69% 


78% 


59% 






7 


90% 


72% 


75% 


53% 






8 


92% 


78% 


76% 


51% 


74% 


40% 



The 7 th grade English and 8 th grade science scores were both ranked in the top 5 
in the state of Massachusetts (over 450 middle schools). 

COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Blake's community service program, Students Involved in Public Service 
(SIPS), continued to make significant contributions to Medfield and other nearby 
communities. This past year we collected coats for Coats for Kids and we 
collected used books for a school in Boston during our Annual Blake Middle 
School Book Swap. We provided dinners for residents of Tilden Village and the 
Upham House, both located in Medfield. The proceeds of our annual Lip Sync 
competition ($3,000) were distributed to several charity organizations, and the 
Hoops for Heart event raised over $4,200 for the American Heart Association. 
In a sign of compassion and concern for others, the Blake community raised 
$5,700 for relief support after a devastating earthquake struck Haiti. Our 8 th 
graders volunteered their time and labor to support the City of Boston's 
Christmas in the City program. In addition to helping set up the event, the 8 th 
graders raised over $1,300 for gifts by hosting a students vs. faculty basketball 
game. 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

There were many professional development opportunities for staff. Highlights 
included bullying and harassment training for all staff. This training, which is 
mandated by the state's new bullying law, was focused on the Massachusetts 
Aggression Reduction Center's, Train the Trainer protocol. Two math teachers, 
Marissa Gumas and Nancy McLaughlin, attended a series of workshops as part 
of Project ABLE, which emphasizes blending technology and traditional methods 
of instruction. Other topics for staff included common/formative assessments, 
classroom intervention strategies, and technology instruction. 

CHINA INITIATIVE 



Our partnership with the Bengbu #6 Middle School continued to grow. Last 
summer, a group of 6 th grade teachers at Blake met with a group of teachers in 

142 



Bengbu via Skype teleconferencing. The purpose of this work was to create an 
integrated project that could be shared by students in both schools. By using 
Voice Thread software, groups of students created projects that focused on 
culture, geography, and philosophy. 

In 2010, the Blake Middle School offered Mandarin as a foreign language for the 
first time. Students in 7 th grade were given the opportunity to take Mandarin 
language classes, a course that will run parallel to our Spanish and French 
programs. This is a two-year program that will lead students to further Mandarin 
studies at Medfield High School. 

The Medfield-Bengbu exchange program took another big leap when ten Bengbu 
#6 Middle School students and two teachers traveled to Medfield for a three- 
week stay. The students and teachers stayed with host families in Medfield. 
attended school at Blake and Medfield High School, and were able to see many 
sights in New England. This was an incredible experience for the exchange 
students, the host students and their families, as well as the Medfield community 
as a whole. This partnership has grown bigger and faster than we could have 
imagined and we are looking forward to future exchanges. 

In closing, with the help of our central administration, school committee and 
other parent organizations, we will continue to work hard to provide our students 
with unique opportunities both in and outside of the classroom. I consider it an 
honor and privilege to serve the Medfield community and I look forward to many 
more accomplishments in 201 1. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert A. Parga 
Principal 



143 



REPORT OF THE DALE STREET SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As principal for the Dale Street School for the 2010 to 2011 school year, I am 
delighted to submit this report for the year ending December 3 1 , 20 1 0. 

ENROLLMENT 

The enrollment at Dale Street School on October 1, 2010 was 232 students in 
grade four and 222 students in grade five for a total of 454 students. The average 
class size was in the range of 20/24 students per class. 

INSTRUCTIONAL HIGHLIGHTS AND ACHIEVEMENTS 

The major instructional focus this past year at the Dale Street School has been 
developing a shared understanding of Response to Intervention. RTI integrates 
assessment and intervention with a multi-leveled prevention system that 
maximizes student achievement and reduces behavior problems. All teaching 
staff were trained in a workshop model during job-embedded time. The training 
was provided by a competitive Literacy Grant written by the Director of 
Curriculum and Assessment. The shared understanding is the foundation for 
continued work in developing programs that identify students at risk and provide 
research based instruction and interventions while monitoring the progress. In the 
fall of 2010, a committee was formed to further our understanding of how to 
apply this method to the age group represented at Dale Street. 

In the spring of 2010, we piloted an after school Reading Intervention program in 
both fourth and fifth grade. Students received two additional hours of 
foundational support in reading and writing. Grant funds supported the 
implementation of the program. The success of our pilot led to the 
implementation of a Reading Intervention program in the fall of 2010. Two 
reading specialists provide support to identified students for a minimum of two 
periods per week. 

Another instructional focus was continuing to implement and improve our 
Balanced Literacy Program. Teachers have been provided with on-going, 
sustained professional development during many of the In-Service days as well 
as job-embedded professional days. Our K-5 Literacy and Social Studies 
Curriculum Coordinator facilitated the teacher training in Literacy, Independent 
Reading and managing the Literacy block. 

Dale Street teachers have also continued the implementation of our social studies 
program. The McGraw-Hill program is Massachusetts standards-based and has a 
literacy component that matches our goals for a Balanced Literacy program. 

144 



Several grade level meetings and job-embedded days allowed teachers the 
necessary time to evaluate the program, design pacing schedules and assessments 
and share successes and impressions of the program. 

Science continues to be a focus for Dale Street as well. A new science program 
(Scot Foresman) was purchased for the fifth grade in the fall of 2009. Further 
supplementation of the program was funded in the spring of 2010. In-service 
days and job-embedded days have been and will continue to be utilized for 
science teachers to evaluate the new program, design pacing schedules and 
assessments as well as share successes and impressions of the program. The 
Museum of Science provided an entire day of training for the science and 
technology unit on magnetism. 

Dale Street School's Math Intervention Program successfully continues for its 
second year. The program identifies 4 th and 5 th grade students who would benefit 
from extra math support. Students receive an extra two periods per week of 
foundational math support. Careful documentation has been kept by our math 
specialist to assess the individual student's progress. 

Dale Street has continued to work with the (K-5) technology integration 
specialist. Students in both grade 4 and 5 participate in bi-weekly technology 
classes that integrate the technology standards with information literacy. Students 
also focus on keyboarding skills with a goal of leaving Dale Street able to type 
20 words per minute without errors and using correct fingering. 

ENRICHMENT OPPORTUNITIES 

Students continued their participation in a number of enrichment activities. The 
entire school attended a play at the Wheelock Family Theatre (Annie). Fifth 
grade students experienced a field trip to the Christa McAuliffe Space Center at 
Framingham State College. Fourth grade participated in a three week long "Poet 
in Residence" (Andrew Green). Fifth grade participated in a three week long 
"Author in Residence" (Barbara O'Connor). 

School-wide enrichment included the continuation of our Intramural Program, 
the Bullying and Teasing Program, the National Geography Bee and Performing 
Arts performances that featured The Magic ofLyn; Ben Franklin (Grade 5) ,and 
Leeny DelSeamonds. Quarterly school-wide assemblies emphasized the themes 
of bullying and teasing, safety, world hunger, Memorial Day; and school spirit 
and community. 

FUTURE GOALS 

Several goals for the Dale Street School have been identified and will be 
continuously reviewed. A sampling of these goals is as follows: 

145 



♦ Implement a Balanced Literacy Program 

♦ Implement the Mathematics Program with an emphasis on alignment, pacing 
and common assessments 

♦> Implement, monitor and improve our Reading and Math Intervention 
Programs 

♦ Continue to review and revise the Character Education Program with an 
emphasis on the state's new Bullying Law 

♦> Implement the social studies curriculum in both grades 4 and 5 with an 
emphasis on pacing, alignment and common assessment 

♦ Continue the process of implementing and assessing the science curriculum 
with an emphasis on pacing, alignment and common assessments 

♦ Review and revise the technology standards with an added emphasis on 
integrating technology into the curriculum and differentiating instruction 

♦ Continue to update, upgrade, repair and maintain the school facility 

STAFF RECOGNITION 

Congratulations to Dale Street School teachers Kathleen Curran, Bethany 
Sager, and Kathryn Walunas. These teachers have been chosen to participate 
in the third year of the federally funded Teaching American History grant 
program. This grant of $999,525 was awarded to The Education Cooperative of 
Dedham with the goal of raising student achievement by improving teachers' 
knowledge and understanding of and appreciation for traditional U.S. history. 
This grant program immerses teachers in the history of Citizenship and the 
Changing Meaning of Democracy, working with partners such as UMASS 
Boston, Tsongas Industrial History Center, Old Sturbridge Village, the American 
Antiquarian Society, and the Paul Revere House. The teachers will earn graduate 
credits, receive resources for their classrooms and enrich their knowledge of 
American history with renowned professors. 

Teachers from the collaborative applied for 35 positions via a competitive 
application process. These teachers did an exemplary job and were chosen to 
participate. 

PUBLIC/PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT 

Throughout the school year the Dale Street School Council, The Medfield 
Coalition for Public Education (MCPE), The Special Education Advisory 
Council (SEPAC) and the Community School Association (CSA) have continued 
to provide opportunities for parental involvement with the goal of strengthening 
the tie between home and school. 

The Coalition and CSA provided Dale Street School with funding for ten 
interactive whiteboards in the classrooms and one Smart board for the Library 

146 



Media Center. The CSA provided funds for the fifth grade celebration, the fifth 
grade yearbooks, classroom celebrations, classroom needs, sponsored the Family 
Bingo Night, Barnes and Noble Book Fair, and Kids Night Out. The CSA also 
raised funds through SCRIP, and the sale of Yankee Candles and provided our 
volunteer force in the Library Media Center. 

The School Council continues to support the development of school goals, to 
provide input into the development of the school budget and School 
Improvement Plan. 

We continue to be incredibly grateful for the tremendous support from both our 
parents and the Medfield community. 

It is an honor and a privilege to be the principal of such a warm and inclusive 
school. The students, staff and parents create a unique and special school. I look 
forward to another year at Dale Street. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kim L. Cave 

Principal 



147 



REPORT OF THE RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I am pleased to once again report on the school year ending December 31, 2010 
in my 7 th year as principal of the Ralph Wheelock School. 

Our enrollment for 2010 was 408 students in grades two and three and 6 
students in the special education collaborative programs housed at our school 
(ACCEPT and TEC). 

Wheelock teachers and staff continuously seek out best practices and ways to 
improve instruction for our students and this past year was no exception. The 
Medfield Coalition for Public Education (MCPE) generously funded several 
grants that allowed teams of teachers to attend workshops in both math and 
literacy. Our literacy coordinator and a team of teachers attended the 
Massachusetts Reading Association's 41 st Conference and brought back many 
ideas to further differentiate instruction in literacy through the use of leveled 
text. Staff members also attended a 2-day conference sponsored by the Center 
for Teaching/Learning Mathematics where they learned many strategies for 
supporting students who struggle in math. Teachers shared the knowledge 
gained by attending these workshops by hosting their own in-house workshops 
for Wheelock colleagues. I continue to be amazed at the collective energy and 
enthusiasm for life-long learning demonstrated by our teachers, and am 
thankful for the high quality professional development opportunities available 
to us. 

Governor Patrick signed the Act Relative to Bullying in Schools in 2010. As 
part of our social competency program, students at the Wheelock School took 
The Bully Pledge stating: 

• / agree to not bully other students, 

• / will help students who are bullied by speaking out and getting adult 
help. 

• I will include students who are left out 

Our school psychologist, Dr. Kim Perry, worked with a team of teachers over 
the summer to develop lesson plans for use in classrooms and health classes 
throughout the year that continue to foster and support our inclusive school 
environment. Our health teachers, Mr. Mike Slason and Mr. Nick Stevens, also 
developed a series of skits for our school assemblies where children role play 
strategies to use when confronted with bullying behavior. 



148 



The Wheelock Community School Association (CSA) continued to support 
many programs throughout the year that provided depth to our curriculum and 
strengthened the home school connection. Of note is the commitment our CSA 
makes each year to fully support our third grade trip to Rocky Woods, both 
financially and with volunteers. Students in third grade study the Colonial 
Period for several weeks at the start of school each year. The social studies unit 
culminates in each child spending a day in period costume experiencing life as 
a pilgrim at Rocky Woods. Words cannot do justice to the enormous volunteer 
effort displayed by our larger school community in preparing for this special 
event. Many thanks to our CSA volunteers and local Girl Scout troops, and a 
special thanks to Dianna Milesko for being crazy enough to head up the event 
each year. 

I am happy to report Wheelock School has had another successful year due to 
an incredible staff, engaged parents and the support of our larger community. 

It is with sadness, however, that I report the unexpected death of another 
beloved member of our teaching staff, Mrs. Kathy Harlow. It seems 
incomprehensible that Wheelock has suffered another loss, yet I can say that 
while we deeply feel Kathy' s absence we are also so very thankful that she was 
a part of our Wheelock family. Mrs. Harlow embodied the teacher we all aspire 
to be - the teacher we all want our children to have. The gift of having had her 
in our lives continues to inspire us all in making the world a better place for 
children. 



Respectfully submitted, 

M. Patty Allen 
Principal 



149 



REPORT OF THE MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As principal of the Memorial School, I respectfully submit my annual report for 
the year ending December 3 1 , 20 1 0. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFFING 

The Memorial School services students in our integrated preschool, 
kindergarten and grade one programs. Memorial's enrollment as of October 1, 
2010 totaled 419 students. This total was comprised of 53 preschoolers 
enrolled in morning, afternoon and extended day session, 163 kindergartners 
who attend morning or afternoon or a full day integrated session and 203 first 
grade students. 

There are currently 2 preschool classrooms that provide several scheduling 
options based on student need. There are eight kindergarten classrooms 
comprised of seven half day sessions and one full day session. Average class 
size for kindergarten is between 18 and 21. Memorial has ten first grade 
classrooms with an average class size of 20. 

All our classroom teachers and specialists are highly qualified and have lengthy 
experience in working with young children. The ability to understand and work 
with a very young population has created a child friendly atmosphere that offers 
patience and warmth while providing the vital instruction for success in early 
math, literacy and social development. 

INSTRUCTIONAL HIGHLIGHTS 

The Memorial School staff continually strives to expand their knowledge of 
instructional techniques and current best practices to provide excellence in 
learning for our students. To achieve this goal, teachers have participated in a 
variety of training opportunities through district sponsored workshops that have 
focused on techniques of intervention in the regular education classroom. 
Much of our training this year has been offered in-house during job embedded 
days and teacher professional days. This effort has brought us closer to our 
goal of providing all students quality instruction that has measurable outcomes. 
The ability to provide consistent classroom curriculum, intervene with targeted 
instruction in the classroom (tiered instruction), and identify children who 
require special education services is the goal of Response to Intervention (RTI), 
a state wide goal which is embraced at the Memorial School. 



150 



This transition to an RTI model has continued to focus the professional 
development agenda to create methods for measurable student learning through 
common assessment. Faculty members are looking at data to quantify learning 
and insure that quality of education is adequate for all students. As with any 
change, time, reflection and adjustment are necessary, but the interest in 
continually improving student success for all children is a priority at Memorial. 

Although data and finely tuned curriculum are the operatives in professionals' 
minds, the Memorial teaching staff continues to offer developmentally 
appropriate lessons that grow our language and numerical literacy. Children 
grow to be joyful readers, problem solvers, inquisitive young scientists, and 
socially competent members of our school. An adult observing a classroom 
will see children learning letters and sounds through song, puzzles, pencil and 
paper, mystery boxes and small group instruction. Math class consists of paper 
pencil tasks that have been preceded by the use of manipulative blocks, 
measuring tools, and group brainstorming sessions. Writing Workshop 
provides children the opportunity to write about themselves which is often 
previewed by student to student interviewing or friendly conversation with 
writing partners. Our curious youngsters engage in many hands-on science 
activities throughout the year that are supported by up to date reading and video 
materials from our library. 

The nation has been dealing with the critical issue of bullying. Although our 
children are young, we are committed to providing guidance and instruction on 
the importance of social competency, the importance of kindness, and building 
resiliency. Using the Open Circle curriculum as our primary guide, the 
Memorial staff has revamped and reinvested in our social competency 
curriculum. As a team, the teachers and specialists reviewed the new edition of 
the Open Circle curriculum. The topics of bullying and teasing have been 
added to the material. Kindergarten teachers have a collection of mandatory 
read alouds and Open Circle lessons. First graders meet regularly for Open 
Circle discussions that range from respectful behavior to beginning problem 
solving techniques that require calm communication and support of adults. Our 
web site contains our policy and incident reporting forms to help parents 
understand the process used to assist children through a difficult time. 

Our very young students arrive at Memorial School already exposed to 
technology. Teachers received training focused on state frameworks 

requirements for young learners. Classrooms continue to strive to expose 
children to the proper use of a key board, safe use of a computer, and a variety 
of excellent programs that support learning. 



151 



COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT 

Memorial School is most fortunate to have the remarkable involvement of 
parents and community members in our building at all times. Volunteers assist 
in our library, lunchroom, and classrooms. Senior citizens volunteer their time 
as greeters and classroom helpers. The Memorial Community School 
Association (CSA) has raised funds for our visiting performers and authors. 
They have purchased library and classroom books and unit materials. The 
volunteers work closely with the Memorial staff members to bring in authors, 
poets and performers who enhance our curriculum. 

Once again a successful Winter Carnival was hosted by the Memorial School. 
The day was very well attended and ample funds were raised for Memorial and 
Wheelock projects. The volunteer effort was outstanding! 

Our Literacy Lab continues to be a vital part of our instruction. The four 
computers in the lab were paid for by the CSA three years ago. The operation 
of the lab is fully supported by volunteer parents who arrive daily and assist 
children while they learn from Lexia and SuperPhonics software. 

From the day a child begins his/her educational journey at Memorial School, 
the process of understanding how he/she fits as a member of a community 
begins. Our goal is to help our young students begin to develop an 
understanding of the world around them. In conjunction with our Social 
Competency program and Social Studies curriculum, several drives were held. 
The children earned coins for UNICEF, brought in food donations for the 
Medfield Food Cupboard, and collected gently used books for needy schools 
and libraries. 



FUTURE TRENDS 

In this busy world, we notice that children are challenged by the many stimuli 
around them. We will explore methods for helping all children self-calm and 
manage stress in their daily lives. The ability to self-calm, develop self-respect 
and problem solving skills are all steps to avoiding difficulties with bullying. 
We will be planning a night for parents to discuss the elements of this important 
topic. 

Continued investment in creating a broad and deep Rtl program will continue. 
Components of this effort will be to further identify appropriate and effective 
methods of intervention, teacher training, and communication to families. 



152 



We will continue to collaborate with the Wheelock and Dale Street staff to 
insure parity and continuity of math instruction and standards based 
assessment. 

As my fifth year as principal of the Memorial School progresses, I feel most 
fortunate to work with a highly qualified and motivated staff. The community 
of Medfield continues to uphold its commitment to the education of its 
children. The collaborative efforts of parents, teachers, support staff and 
community members are reflected in the successes of our students. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Andrea Trasher 
Principal 



153 



Students 


Dec. 


1,2009 


ages 3-5 




42 


ages 6-17 




335 


ages 18-22 




15 

392 



REPORT OF THE PUPIL SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I wish to submit my Pupil Services Department Report for the year ending 
December 31, 2010. 

Special Education 

The student enrollment in the special education program has remained relatively 
stable over the course of the year with a slight increase for students ages 3-5 and 
18-22 and a decrease in students ages 6-17. Overall student special education 
enrollment has decreased. 



Dec. 1,2010 

45 
308 
12 

372 

Most of our children receive their services within our school system as indicated 
below: 

Special Education Figures Only Dec. 1, 2010 

Grades K-5 149 

Grades 6-8 87 

Grades 9-12 77 

Collaborative/Public Day Placements 9 

Private Day 2 1 

This has been a busy and productive year in the department. The department has 
focused on several specific areas over the course of the year including 
consistency of programming, professional development, updating the pupil 
services handbook for staff and preparing for the upcoming Coordinated Program 
Review. In addition, throughout the year the pupil services department has 
attended numerous workshops and courses. Some of these include the Wilson 
Reading Program, Edmark, Using Sensory Strategies in the Classroom and The 
Social Thinking Curriculum. 



154 



Staff Handbook 

A comprehensive staff handbook was created in collaboration with all pupil 
services staff in the spring of 2005. While much of the information contained in 
the handbook is still very relevant, due to changes in state regulations and student 
population, the department has been focusing on updating the handbook. Once 
completed, this will be provided to pupil services staff to ensure all staff are 
utilizing the same information and forms. In addition, the staff handbook will be 
a training tool and will include materials designed to help current and new staff 
continue to develop their teaching and instructional skills. Any newly hired pupil 
services staff will be provided with a copy of the handbook and will go through 
training on the policies and procedures of the Medfield Pupil Services 
Department. 

Coordinated Program Review 

With the move to a Web Based Monitoring System, the Department of 
Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) has now required all paperwork 
for the 6 year Coordinated Program Review be submitted the year previous to the 
on-site visit. The Pupil Services Department has already begun preparations for 
this review and will be submitting documentation to the DESE in the spring of 
2011. Areas included in the review are Special Education, Civil Rights and 
English Language Learner Education. 

School Health Services 

Four full time and two half time nurses provide services to students preschool 
through grade 12, including the TEC classroom housed at the Wheelock 
Elementary School. The role of the school nurse continues to expand as the 
student population faces a broad spectrum of complex health issues. The nurses 
provide: health assessments (including blood pressure, cardiac, peak flow, 
pulmonary and blood sugar monitoring), injury assessment and first aid, 
medication administration, field trip preparations, psychosocial support and 
referrals as well as assisting in maintaining a healthy school environment. 

The nurses continue to broaden their knowledge base and keep updated on new 
clinical and educational approaches. Over the course of the year the nurses not 
only attended the National Association of School Nurses 41 st Annual Conference 
- Partners for Student Success, they also attended and were provided training in 
other very relevant areas. Some of these include "supporting our students 
through school and community health partnerships", "using yoga to manage 
anxiety in schools", "head injuries in children: what school nurses need to know" 
and "the role of the school nurse in the coordinated school health model". In 
addition, the school nurses continue to be key personnel in each building in 

155 



regards to the Wellness Policy that was adopted by the School Committee in 
August 2006. 

The diverse role of the school nurse also includes: coordinating the care for 
children with special health care needs, writing and supporting individualized 
health care plans, participation at special education team meetings, conducting 
home visits as recommended by the school planning team, providing education 
on health issues for students, staff, and parents as well as performing state 
mandated screenings and monitoring state requirements including physical 
examination and immunization records. 

Visits to the health offices last year included 32,152 student visits and 1,105 staff 
visits. Additionally, over 5500 health screenings were conducted, including: 
vision and hearing, scoliosis, pediculosis, and height and weights with body mass 
indexes calculated. The nurses greatly appreciated community volunteers who 
assisted in completing vision and hearing screenings in all our schools. 

Preschool 

The integrated preschool providers have 6 half-day early childhood sessions 
servicing 30 four year old and 26 three year old children. The preschool 
continues as a voting member of the Charles River Community Partnership 
Council and is accredited through National Association for Education of Young 
Children (NEAYC). 

Guidance 

The guidance program focuses on the academic and social emotional well being 
of each child. Within the district, there are guidance counselors beginning in 
Grade 2, with a part time counselor at both Wheelock and Dale. Three full time 
guidance counselors work at the Blake Middle School. Medfield High School 
has three traditional guidance counselors who work with students through 
alphabetically divided caseloads. There is a caseload that is shared between the 
guidance content specialist and another guidance counselor in the guidance 
office. This guidance counselor works directly with students who may have 
more specific needs in the high school and provides resources for her colleagues. 
The guidance content specialist works to oversee the guidance programming for 
all students within the district. 

The high school guidance office takes a developmental approach which is 
directly connected to the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. Beginning in 
the eighth grade students begin the discussion about options for programs of 
study and also attend a transition day in June which introduces these students to 
various aspects of the high school. During their freshman year, there is an 

156 



orientation day where guidance meets with students to discuss transition, four 
year planning, goals setting, transcripts and making the most out of high school. 
During their sophomore year, students work on career exploration, interest 
inventories, resumes, and interviews. Junior year shifts the focus to future 
planning for post-graduation. Senior year is dedicated to the application process 
for either college or jobs and the means in which that process directly relates to 
the individual student. Senior year also includes topics such as scholarships and 
the transition from high school. Improved communication with parents, students, 
and teachers is a constant goal within the office. There is a standing Guidance 
Advisory group that meets. It is comprised of parents, students and the guidance 
counselors and meets to discuss current concerns or issues within the office. The 
guidance office uses Edline, e-mails, newsletters, and the website to 
communicate effectively with parents and students. Parent coffees and evening 
programs are conducted for each of the four grades to support the guidance 
curriculum. In addition, the web based tool, Naviance, has become an effective 
means to support the efforts made by the guidance office in all grades of the high 
school. 

The Blake guidance department is a key piece in the overall development of all 
students. The counselors are available to the students to support them in areas 
such as achieving academic success, developing a healthy self-esteem, working 
on time management skills, the ability to cope with change and also how to work 
with others. The guidance counselors also teach group guidance classes at each 
of the grade levels with information presented which is specific to the 
development needs of the students and mirrors the Massachusetts Curriculum 
Frameworks. Specific areas of focus are life skills, study skills, change, 
embracing diversity and community service. Through these group guidance 
classes, as well as individual counseling and interactions with colleagues and 
parents, the counselor works to foster the personal growth of each student. 

Personnel 

We are pleased that Ms. Anna Lassoff has joined our department as the grades 4- 
8 Inclusion Coordinator at Dale and Blake Schools. Ms. Dawn Sockol and Ms. 
Judy Robinson have also joined the department as Co-Out of District 
Coordinators. Also, Ms. Edith Birney has joined us as a Special Education 
teacher at the Dale Street School. 



Respectfully Submitted 

Matthew LaCava 
Director of Pupil Services 



157 



REPORT OF THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my annual report as the athletic director for the Medfield 
Public Schools for the year ending December 31, 2010. 

It is my pleasure to report that for the sixteenth year in a row over seventy-five 
percent of the student body participated in athletics. This statistic reaffirms the 
integral part athletics play in our school and the education of our children. 

My goal will be to continue to emphasize the tradition of sportsmanship, which 
has been our history here in Medfield. Fair play, competition, goal setting, team 
work, are just a few of the life lessons that athletics can teach. Athletics truly is 
the other half of education. 

We offer 27 varsity interscholastic sports to our students. This year we won ten 
Tri Valley League Championships, and 73% of all our contests. This has been a 
very special year for athletic programs in that we won the Earnest Dalton Award 
for overall athletic success. This is the fifth time in fifteen years that Medfield 
High School has won this prestigious award. 

Boys and girls interscholastic teams were offered at three levels during the past 
year. The following is the entire athletic coaching staff by season: 

WINTER 



Basketball (Boys) 


Varsity 

Junior Varsity 
Freshman 


Herb Grace 
Ken Brackett 
Al Necchi 
Evan Moon 


Basketball (Girls) 


Varsity 

Junior Varsity 
Freshman 


Mark Nickerson 
Ellen Willey 
Paul Coutinho 
Jess Safer 


Ice Hockey(Boys) 


Varsity 
Junior Varsity 


Toby Carlow 
Tony Iafolla 
Rob Lynch 


Ice Hockey (Girls) 


Varsity 


John Panciocco 
Doug Kay 


Indoor Track (Boys) 
Indoor Track (Girls) 




Melinda Lohan 
Tom Woods 
Miranda Whitmore 



158 



Nick Stevens 



Gymnastics 


Varsity 


Bill Matyskiel 


Swimming 


Varsity 
SPRING 


Emily Alland 


Baseball 


Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 


Matt Marenghi 
Mike Mason 
Jeff Cambridge 


Softball 


Varsity 


Sue Pratt 




Junior Varsity 


Travis Taliferro 


Tennis (Boys) 


Varsity 
Assistant 


Vincent Joseph 
Andy Delery 


Tennis (Girls) 


Varsity 
Assistant 


Chris DuBose 
Kristen Kirby 


Track and Field (Boys) Varsity 


Tom Woods 
Bernie Shea 
Mike Kraemer 


Track and Field (Girls) 


Varsity 


Melinda Lohan 
Miranda Whitmore 
Nick Stevens 


Volleyball (Boys) 


Varsity 


John Hastings 


Lacrosse (Boys) 


Varsity 

Junior Varsity 
Freshman 


Robert Aronson 

Michael Douglas 
Evan Moon 


Lacrosse (Girls) 


Varsity 
Junior Varsity 

FALL 


Jason Heim 
Tracy Allen 


Golf 


Varsity 


George Callahan 



159 



Cross Country 
Cross Country 
Field Hockey 

Football 



Soccer (Boys) 



Soccer (Girls) 



Volleyball (Girls) 



Junior Varsity 
Varsity 

Varsity 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Varsity 



Junior Varsity 
Freshman 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 

Varsity 
Assistant 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Junior Varsity II 



Mark Nickerson 

Michael Kraemer 
Bernie Shea 

Diane Lyon 
Cindy Appleyard 

Mike Mason 
Sue Pratt 
Lisa Sailer 

Mike Slason 
Nick Stevens 
Erik Ormberg 
Brian Gavaghan 
Vin Joseph 

Jason Heim 
Paul Coutinho 
Travis Taliffero 

Michael LaFrancesca 
Melinda Lohan 
Kelly Dengos 
John Kendall 

John Hastings 
Amanda Altimar 
Caitlin Kirby 



All of our interscholastic teams participate in the Tri- Valley League which 
consists of Ashland, Bellingham, Dover-Sherborn, Holliston, Hopkinton, 
Medfield, Medway, Millis, Norton and Westwood. Medfield is currently ranked 
third in the TVL in total enrollment, grades nine through twelve. The league is 
highly competitive in all sports, boys and girls. Tri-Valley teams traditionally are 
quite successful in state tournament play. 

Our athletic highlights begin with the winter season, 2009-2010. The girls 
basketball team had an outstanding season going 17-3 and winning the TVL for 
the second year in a row. Mark Nickerson our coach was voted TVL coach of the 
year. The girls qualified for state tournament play for the twentieth year in a 
row. The girls made it to the South Sectional semi-finals in their tournament run. 
Our boys team finished their season with a 14-6 record, and qualified for the 
State Tournament. Girls indoor track had an outstanding record of 6-3, led by 
junior Alex Stanton. Alex set a school record in the 600 meter run. Our boys 

160 



indoor track team was 8-1, and placed second in the league. Joe Smith, Mike 
Creedon, Joe Hill, and Jeff Brown set a school record in the 4X 800. The girls ice 
hockey team posted a 12-4-2 record qualifying for the State Tournament. Our 
swim team was 9-9 on the season. Our girls gymnastics finished their season at 
11-2 and competed in the state finals. 

The spring of 2010 was another successful season for our Warriors. Softball had 
a 9-1 1 record almost qualifying for the tournament. Our baseball team finished 
12-8 and made the tournament under fourth year coach Matt Marenghi. Our 
girls tennis team was 17-1 under new coach Chris DuBose. They won the TVL. 
The boys tennis team finished 1 1-5 and qualified again for the state tournament 
for the twenty-first consecutive year. Boys track finished with a record of 8-1 
winning the tough TVL. Our girls track team finished 6-3 finishing second in the 
TVL. The boys lacrosse team had a remarkable season. They finished the regular 
season with a 20-0 record and won the league for the tenth year in a row. The 
team culminated its magical season with a State Championship at Foley Stadium 
in Worcester against Longmeadow. The girls lacrosse finished the season 14-5-1 
and made it to the South Finals. The boys volleyball team had some great late 
season wins and qualified for the tournament with a 1 0-6 record. 

Fall 2010 was very exciting for our Warrior teams. The girls volleyball won the 
TVL with a 20-0 mark. The team continued its era of dominance by going on to 
beat Case in the State Finals for its fifth championship in six years. Our girls 
volleyball team was the number one ranked team in the state for the third year in 
a row! The football team finished the season with a 5-6 record. The field hockey 
went 9-5-6 in another outstanding season. Julia Biedrzycki was our team and 
league MVP. Boys soccer finished the season 14-0-2 in league play and won the 
league for the third time in 4 years. Our girls soccer program had a dream season 
winning its first league championship in Medfield High School history. The girls 
finished the regular season 15-1-2. Incredibly the dream did not end with a 
league title. The girls soccer team went on to win a State title as well. This was 
our second state title in the same day as our girls volleyball and girls soccer 
teams each won state titles. Our boys cross country team went 8-0 in the league 
winning a second straight TVL title. The girls finished 7-1 under first year coach 
Diane Lyon. The golf team had a 16-1-1 record, winning the TVL and finished 
third in the Division 3 State finals. 

The annual All Sports Awards Night was held June 1 at Medfield High School. 
Our student athletes, coaches and parents were treated to a very special evening 
including the eighth annual Thomas Reis Sportsmanship Award which was 
presented this year to Grace Thole and A.J. Nugent. At the banquet, in addition to 
the individual sport MVP awards, Morganne Gagne, Jeff Brown and Joe Hill 
were selected as the 2009-20010 Scholar Athlete recipients. Medfield High 
School's "Wall of Fame" inductee was Krista Suojanen, Class of 2003. 



161 



This concludes my annual report as the Director of Athletics. On behalf of all the 
Warriors, I would like to thank the School Committee, the administration, and 
the community for all of their support throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jon Kirby 

Director of Athletics 



162 



REPORT OF THE MEDFIELD COMMUNITY EDUCATION 

PROGRAM 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

The Community Education Program continued its tradition of offering a wide 
variety of classes designed to meet the needs of our students and adult learners. 
This year the scope of the adult education program grew significantly. The 
programs now offered in the community education program include: 

ADULT EDUCATION 

The brochure comes out twice a year and offers a diverse selection of courses 
looking to meet the needs of the Medfield community. There are five major 
categories in our brochure. They include: career and financial planning, exercise, 
sports and activities, instructional courses, and a trip and travel section. We hope 
to add more courses in the future. Any ideas or suggestions would be greatly 
appreciated. 

TEACHER WELLNESS PROGRAMS 

These courses were designed to relieve stress and improve the mental and 
emotional health of our faculty. Trips were planned, professional golf instruction 
was offered, exercise classes including Pilates, yoga, and spinning was scheduled 
to meet the needs of our teachers and staff. 

INTRAMURALS 

The goal of the intramural program was to offer activities to all our children. The 
popular fun and fitness programs in the Memorial and Wheelock Schools were 
expanded. The programs in the Dale St. School and the Blake Middle School 
continued to thrive. The high school's program centered on our fitness center 
and offered activities before and after school. 

EXTENDED DAY PROGRAMS 

These programs offered in the Memorial, Wheelock and Dale Street Schools 
were designed with working parents in mind. Programs were offered in each 
school starting at 7:00 a.m. The after school portion of our program was 
operated in conjunction with our fun and fitness intramural programs. 

SUMMER EXPERIENCE 

This program is directed by Kim Estes and run out of the Memorial School 
during the summer months. The tradition of excellence has continued and will be 

163 



enhanced by a full day program this summer and the addition of Herb Grace as a 
co-director. 

The Warrior Athletic Camps was another way for our youth to gain access to our 
facilities. We offered summer experiences in baseball, soccer, basketball, and 
weight training. We hope that this program will continue to grow. 

We look forward to the future of the Community Education Program and what it 
can offer to the citizens of Medfield. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Jon Kirby 
Director 



164 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2010 



165 



BIRTHS 2010 


4/23 


Benjamin W Cunningham 




JANUARY 


4/30 


Cara T Knight 


1/5 


Miles J Hajj 


4/30 


Kiley E Olson 


1/12 


Lyla J Manning 






1/20 


Avery M Konover 




MAY 


1/22 


Connor G Woodland 


5/13 


Abigail J Broderick 


1/24 


Isabella R Borteck 


5/13 


Alexandra R Broderick 


1/31 


Lillian P Patten 


5/13 


Joseph A Callender 






5/19 


Madison E Watts 




FEBRUARY 


5/25 


Mason P Solomon 


2/1 


Emily M Dorman 






2/5 


Carson R McGary 




JUNE 


2/5 


Malachy P McAteer 


6/10 


Samuel F Nolan 


2/9 


Lauren C Mullen 


6/10 


Lucas J Sullivan 


2/12 


Emily R McKechnie 


6/10 


Charles W Kidd 


2/14 


Brynn E Aldrich 


6/10 


Joseph R Kidd 


2/15 


Spencer S Lee 


6/15 


McClain L Howarth 


2/17 


r 

Maxwell R Moir 


6/16 


Dylan S Sullivan 


2/18 


Paige A Uzzell 


6/18 


Treydon J Shu 


2/18 


Kyle P Uzzell 


6/22 


Maxton W Lowry 


2/21 


Meira Z Forman 


6/29 


Dylan A Poikonen 




MARCH 




JULY 


3/1 


Catherine M Riggins 


7/2 


Dante A Centola 


3/4 


C7C 

Adam S Fame 


7/2 


Tyler M Zannella 


3/11 


Calvin A Frey 


7/8 


Clara M Cloutman 


3/12 


Evie J Boylan 


7/11 


Avery E Cagle 


3/16 


Landon T McClements 


7/12 


Gracie R Fox 


3/24 


Elizabeth S Cumming 


7/15 


Noah P LaFrancesca 


3/25 


Zoe A Maher 


7/21 


Sloane A Saber 


3/25 


Margaret E Caruso 


7/23 


Liliana R Hyde 


3/27 


Nora K Tracey 




AUGUST 




APRIL 


8/1 


Russell O Skloff 


4/5 


Andrew P Munz 


8/2 


Benjamin K Nawrocki 


4/10 


Logan M Jones 


8/3 


Joseph T Killilea 


4/12 


Somer A Higgins 


8/3 


Kylie O Killilea 


4/15 


Sophie M Weber 


8/5 


Theodore D Molloy 


4/17 


John Lemke 


8/16 


Jacob A Mula 


4/19 


Edward D Breslin 


8/17 


Alexandra E Kappas 


4/23 


Ryan T Feldman 


8/21 


Stefania Michaelidis 



166 



8/24 Elizabeth J Barrette 

8/25 Meredith C Robertson 

8/27 Hudson K Schomer 

8/30 Owen T Fessenden 

SEPTEMBER 



9/10 


Jason J Perschy 


9/15 


Cole B Turner 


9/18 


Louisa J Becker 


9/20 


Julia L Giangregorio 


9/23 


Freya R Person 


9/24 


Kaylee S Zhang 


9/26 


Jordan C Agnello 


9/27 


Grayson A Mesite 


9/28 


Nicholas J Scobbo, IV 


9/29 


Max T Abramson 




OCTOBER 


10/11 


Hamilton A Krolak 


10/17 


Katherine B Dewar 


10/19 


Owen E Kelly 


10/19 


Bridget M Kelly 


10/19 


Daniel Rusin 


10/21 


Nolan M O'Keeffe 


10/22 


Lia K Kenworthy 


10/29 


Caroline G Polak 




NOVEMBER 


11/8 


Ryan C Perachi 


11/10 


Elise L Duross 


11/24 


Ryan J McCarthy 


11/30 


Tess K Henebry 




DECEMBER 



12/2 Miranda L Farrell 

12/8 Margaret J Fraser 

12/14 Fiona K Harvey 

12/26 Joseph K Brennan 

12/26 Robert J Watts 



167 



MARRIAGES 2010 


NOVEMBER 




MARCH 


11/7 Candice L Cole 


3/13 


Lawrence J 
Giangregorio 


Armand J Beaulieu 




Kelly L Sullivan 


DECEMBER 

12/5 Kimberly R Navratil 




APRIL 


Roy R Hunkins 


4/17 


David D Kemmerer 


12/29 Kara A Rogers 




Leslie S Aldrich 


Richard C Black 




JUNE 




6/17 


Lori A Pelletier 
Susan M Newell 




6/19 


Karen L Miller 
Carl W Brown, III 

JULY 




7/7 


Christopher J Grant 
Simone Renee Le 




7/9 


Daniel D Gabriel 
Jennifer M 
O'Malley 

AUGUST 




8/14 


David F Hendren 
Astrid S Bigham 

SEPTEMBER 




9/5 


Marigny L Mulock 
Travis E Rivers 




9/18 


Seth W Z Robbins 
Susan D Allard 

OCTOBER 




10/9 


Peter D Engles 
Joyce F Kennedy 




10/10 


Judith M Doucette 
Peter J.B. Teague 




10/14 


Richard D Vatour 
Claudia H Oliver 





168 



DEATHS 2010 




JUNE 




JANUARY 


6/4 


Carol A Hasapidis 


1/1 


Maureen C Setterlund 


6/4 


Mary V Warren 


1/12 


Eileen B Strier 


6/5 


Patricia M Frazier 


1/18 


Deanne A Stanley 


6/10 


Dwight A Carter 


1/19 


Letitia Civetti 


6/15 


Rose A Burr 


1/24 


Gus W Thornton, MD 


6/18 


Shirley Andler 


1/30 


Ruth L Spencer 


6/23 


Arthur T Doyle 




FEBRUARY 




JULY 


2/3 


Thomas A Casey 


7/4 


Phyllis K Francis 


2/3 


Bruce Tobiasson 


7/5 


Josephine M Moran 


2/3 


Mary M Gillis 


7/10 


Donald C Holborn 


2/21 


James J Generoso 


7/12 


Patrick P Cody 


2/21 


Beverly P Bond 


7/18 


George M Chick 


2/25 


Cheryll Weston 






2/25 


Mary C McWilliams 




AUGUST 






8/3 


Kylie O Killilea 




MARCH 


8/7 


Paul L Saulnier 


3/15 


William C Kneer 


8/11 


Elizabeth A Kenney 


3/17 


John G Kenney 






3/26 


Yaroslava Kukil 




SEPTEMBER 


3/28 


Mary Palmer 


9/5 


Anna M Murphy 


3/28 


Georgia E Allen 


9/27 


Mary G Valentine 




APRIL 




OCTOBER 


4/2 


Emily Seeglitz 


10/3 


Ralph T Scott 


4/6 


Roma L Curran 


10/5 


Robert W Fennell 


4/20 


John Candella 


10/10 


Ilze H Davenport 


4/23 


Kathleen C Campbell 


10/27 


Kathleen F Melia 






10/27 


Maurice H Leonard 




MAY 


10/30 


Mildred E Willis 


5/1 


Robert G Beath 






5/12 


Marguerite C McNulty 




NOVEMBER 


5/15 


Cecilia G Vachon 


11/7 


Ruth L Bird 


5/17 


Robert Alterio 


11/15 


Peter B Kenny 


5/22 


Robert F Friel, Sr 


11/17 


Anne J Zitoli 


5/24 


Francis A Romano 






5/25 


Bridget G Lyall 




DECEMBER 


5/28 


Jean K Anderson 


12/4 


Elizabeth M Logue 






12/7 


Mary T Jacobs 



169 



12/11 


Saraswathy Nagarajan 


12/19 


Aspasia Faltas 


12/19 


Rose A Hudack 


12/24 


Shirley R Ziven 


12/25 


Dana E Anderson 


12/27 


Richard W Smallfield 


12/29 


Alice E MacBride 


12/29 


Anna L Iverson 



170 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 

SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

WARRANT FOR SPECIAL STATE ELECTION 

JANUARY 19, 2010 

Norfolk, SS 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn 
the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield who are qualified to vote in Special State 
Elections to vote at Precincts 1, 2, 3, 4 at the CENTER at Medfield, located on 
Ice House Road, on TUESDAY, THE NINETEENTH DAY OF JANUARY, 
2010 from 6:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the Special State Election for the candidates of political 
parties for the following office: 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon, unto 
the Town Clerk at the time and place of election aforesaid. Given unto our hands 
this 1 5th day of December in the year Two Thousand Nine. 

Ann Thompson S/ 
Mark Fisher S/ 
Osier Peterson S/ 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town 
of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose 
named, by posting attested copies of the same at five public places seven days 
before the date of the meeting as within directed. 

Constable: Larz Anderson S/ 
Date: December 16,2009 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer, CMC/CMMC S\ 
Town Clerk 

171 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

SPECIAL STATE ELECTION 

JANUARY 19, 2010 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with the 
swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were inspected and 
found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting precincts listing 
displayed and instruction to the voters posted. 

ELECTION OFFICERS: Al Allegretto, Rita Allegretto, Jane Timmerman, Lisa 
Donovan, Richard Clarke, Tim Mayer, John Allegretto, Steve Catanese and 
Muffy Smick 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 6,160 - Total Registered Voters numbered 8,359 - 75% of the 
voters voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as follows: 









PRECINCT 




SENATOR IN CONGRESS 


1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAL 


Scott P. Brown 


875 


977 


1035 


955 


3842 


Martha Coakley 


590 


565 


593 


528 


2276 


Joseph L. Kennedy 


8 


12 


9 


11 


40 


Write In 


1 








1 


Blanks 










1 
6160 



Polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and tally sheets 
were turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping, as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer, CMC/CMMC S\ 
TOWN CLERK 

January 20, 2010 



172 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 

MARCH 29, 2010 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 A.M. with reading of the 
warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list was 
displayed and instruction to the voters posted. 

WARDEN: Emmy Mitchell 

TELLERS: Al Allegretto, John Hand, Patricia Rioux, Rita Allegretto, Jane Timmerman, 
Lisa Donovan, Steve Catanese, Muffy Smick 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 1,009. There are 8,232 registered voters, 12% of voters voting. 

PRECINCT 





I 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAL 


MODERATOR (one yr) VOTE FOR ONE 












Scott F. McDermott 


207 


217 


202 


207 


833 


Write In 


1 






1 


2 


Blanks 


58 


48 


35 


33 


174 
1009 


SELECTMEN (three yrs) VOTE FOR ONE 












Elizabeth Eckel Scola 


96 


86 


97 


88 


367 


Ann B Thompson 


162 


170 


130 


147 


609 


Write In 


2 




1 


1 


4 


Blanks 


6 


9 


9 


5 


29 
1009 


ASSESSOR (three yrs) VOTE FOR ONE 












R Edward Beard 


194 


213 


178 


193 


778 


Write In 


1 


1 


1 




3 


Blanks 


71 


51 


58 


48 


228 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE (three yrs) VOTE FOR 

NOT MORE THAN TWO 
Timothy Bonfatti 
Christopher Morrison 
Write In 
Blanks 



187 202 182 184 

33 33 40 33 

38 38 45 37 

307 290 247 261 



755 

139 

158 

1105 

2018 



LIBRARY TRUSTEE (three yrs) VOTE FOR 
NOT MORE THAN TWO 



Robert Luttman 


194 


196 


173 


172 


735 


James Whelan 


191 


196 


165 


176 


728 


Write In 


1 








1 


Blanks 


146 


138 


136 


134 


554 
2018 


LIBRARY TRUSTEE (two yrs) VOTE FOR 












ONE 












Steven Pelosi 


203 


203 


184 


185 


775 


Write In 




4 






4 


Blanks 


63 


58 


53 


56 


230 
1009 



173 



PLANNING BOARD (five yrs) VOTE FOR ONE 

George Lester 190 206 181 178 755 

Write In 1 1 

Blanks 76 59 55 63 253 

1009 

PARK COMMISSIONER (three yrs) VOTE 
FOR NOT MORE THAN TWO 



Melville Seiboh 


160 


172 


149 


160 


641 


Nicholas T Brown 


174 


166 


155 


154 


649 


Write In 


1 




2 




3 


Blanks 


197 


192 


168 


168 


725 
2018 


HOUSING AUTHORITY (five yrs) VOTE FOR 












ONE 












Paul Galante 


62 


83 


81 


71 


297 


Roberta Lynch 


190 


157 


136 


150 


633 


Write In 













Blanks 


14 


25 


20 


20 


79 
1009 


TRUST FUND COMMISSIONER (three yrs) 












VOTE FOR ONE 












Michael Sullivan 


1 


3 


2 


5 


11 


Gregory Reid 


6 


6 


3 


5 


20 


Write In 


14 


13 


19 


18 


64 


Blanks 


252 


252 


218 


223 


945 



1009 

After the results were announced, the checked ballots, voting lists and tally sheets were 
turned over to the Town Clerk for safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Carol A. Mayer, CMC/CMMC S\ 
TOWN CLERK 

March 30, 2010 



174 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
2010 

Norfolk, ss. 

To the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said County, Greetings: 

In the Name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify and warn the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and in town affairs, to meet at the 
CENTER at Medfield on Ice House Road in said Medfield on Monday the twenty-ninth 
day of March, A.D. 2010 at 6:00 o'clockA.M., then and there to act on the following 
items: 

Article 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected annually by ballot, viz: 

One Moderator for a term of one year; 

One Library Trustee for a term of two years; 

One Selectmen, One Assessor, Two School Committee Members, Two Library Trustees; 

Two Park Commissioners and One Trust Fund Commissioner each for a term of three 

years; 

One Member of the Planning Board and One member of the Housing Authority each for 

a term of five years 

The polls will open at 6:00 o'clock A.M. and shall be closed at 8:00 o'clock P.M. 

On Monday, the twenty-sixth day of April, A.D., 2010 commencing at 7:30 P.M. the 
following articles will be acted on in the Amos Clark Kingsbury gymnasium, located on 
South Street in said Medfield, viz 

Article 2. To see if the Town will vote to accept the reports of the several Town Officers 
for the past year. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

It Was So VOTED: (consent calendar 4/26/2010) 

Article 3. To see if the Town will vote to accept the following named sums as Perpetual Trust 
Funds for the care of lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the interest thereof as may be necessary for 
said care, viz. 

PERPETUAL CARE 2009 

Betty Govers $2,200.00 

Sharon and Marc Green $2,200.00 

MaryVozzella $1,100.00 

Sandra Ventresco $1,100.00 

Ed Schmidt $1,100.00 

David and Claire Cook $2,200.00 

Deirdre Mailing $550.00 

Patricia Connelly $1,100.00 

Perry A. Constas $2,200.00 

Robert and Mimi Alterio $2,200.00 

Louis J. and Joan E. Fellini $2,200.00 

Bruce and Susan Tobiasson $1 ,100.00 

TOTAL: $19,250.00 

(Cemetery Commissioners) 

It Was So VOTED (consent calendar 4/26/2010) 



175 



Article 4. To sec If the Town will vote to re-authorize a Fire Alarm Revolving Fund, 
pursuant to the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53E Vi to be used for fire alarm 
maintenance, equipment or supplies, funds not to exceed $32,000 to come from the 
Maintenance Fee account and to authorize the Fire Chief to expend from said funds, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Chief) 

It Was So VOTED (consent calendar 4/26/2010) 

Article 5. To see if the Town will vote to re-authorize an Ambulance Revolving Fund, 
pursuant to the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53E Vi to be used for an 
Ambulance revolving fund for payment of principal and interest costs on the ambulance 
and or purchase of a replacement ambulance, funds not to exceed $30,000 to come from 
the Ambulance Mileage Fee Account and to authorize the Fire Chief to expend from said 
funds, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Chief) 

It Was So VOTED (consent calendar 4/26/2010) 

Article 6. To see if the Town will vote to re-authorize an Advanced Life Support Fund, 
pursuant to the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53E !/■> to be used for the payment 
of Advanced Life Support charges, funds not to exceed $40,000 to come from the users 
of said services or their insurers and to authorize the Fire Chief to expend from said 
funds, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Fire Chief) 

It Was So VOTED (consent calendar 4/26/2010) 

Article 7. To see if the Town will vote to re-authorize a Community Gardens Revolving 
Fund, pursuant to the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53E Vi to be used for the 
payment of expenses for the operation of the Community Gardens Program, funds not to 
exceed $1,000 to come from registration fees paid by gardeners and to authorize the 
Town Administrator to expend from said funds, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Town Administrator) 

It Was So VOTED (consent calendar 4/26/2010) 

Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to re-authorize a Rental Income Revolving Fund, 
pursuant to the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53E Vi to be used for the 
processing of rental receipts and associated expenditures for the CENTER at Medfield, 
funds not to exceed $30,000 and to authorize the Council on Aging and/or its Executive 
Director to expend from said funds, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Council on Aging) 

It Was So VOTED (consent calendar 4/26/2010) 

Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to re-authorize a Library Revolving Fund, 
pursuant to the provisions of G.L. Chapter 44, Section 53E Vi to be used for payment of 
costs associated with providing photocopier/printer services to library users, with costs 
associated with providing after hours use of public meeting space to community 
organizations and for payment of costs associated with replacing lost or damaged 
materials; funds not to exceed $15,000 to come from the fees charged for use of 
photocopiers/printers, from fees charged for use of meeting rooms after regular hours and 
from the fees charged for the replacement of lost or damaged materials; and to authorize 
the Library Director to expend from said funds, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Library Director) 

It Was So VOTED (consent calendar 4/26/2010) 



176 



Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to accept for the fiscal year 201 1 the provisions 
of section four of Chapter 73 of the Acts of 1986, in accordance with and subject to the 
provisions of said section four, providing for an additional exemption for a taxpayer who 
shall otherwise qualify for an exemption under clauses 17D, 22, 22A, 22B, 22C, 22D, 
22E, 37A, 41C, 42 or 43 of section five of Chapter 59 of the General Laws, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

It Was So VOTED (consent calendar 4/26/2010) 



Article 1 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and determine in 
what manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of funding the collective bargaining 
agreement with the Medfield Firefighters' Association contract for the fiscal year 2010, 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 



(Personnel Board) 

VOTED: That $21,950 be appropriated, said sum to be taken from free cash, for the 
purpose of funding the collective bargaining agreement with the Medfield Firefighters' 
Association contract for the fiscal year 2010. MOTION CARRIES (4/26/2010) 

Article 12. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary and compensation of the 
following elected officers: Moderator, Town Clerk, Selectmen, Assessors, School 
Committee, Trustees of the Public Library, Park and Recreation Commissioners, 
Planning Board, Housing Authority and Trust Fund Commissioners, or do or act anything 
in relation thereto. 



Officer 

Town Clerk 

Selectmen, Chairman 

Selectmen, Clerk 

Selectmen, Third Member 

Assessors, Chairman 

Assessors, Clerk 

Assessors, Third Member 

Moderator 

Housing Authority 

School Committee 

Library Trustees 

Planning Board 

Park and Recreation Commissioners 

Trust Fund Commissioners 



Present Salary 


W.C. Recommends 


$56,255 


$56,255 


900 


900 


900 


900 


900 


900 


900 


900 


900 


900 


900 


900 













































(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTED: To fix the salary and compensation of the following elected officers: 
Moderator, Town Clerk, Selectmen, Assessors, School Committee, Trustees of the Public 
Library, Park and Recreation Commissioners, Planning Board. Housing Authority and 
Trust Fund Commissioners, effective July 1, 2010, by adopting the Warrant Committee 
recommendations as printed in the Warrant. MOTION CARRIES UNANIMOUSULY 
(4/26/2010) 

Article 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend the PERSONNEL 
ADMINISTRATION PLAN and CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY 
SCHEDULE, effective July 1, 2010 to read as set forth in the warrant, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 



177 



PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 

POLICE DEPARTMENT AS PER CONTRACT: 

Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 
Sergeant 

7/1/2007 $1,096.78 $1,130.70 $1,165.45 

binrckh $2,193.55 $2,261.39 $2,330.90 

7/1/2008 $1,129.52 $1,164.45 $1,206.24 
biweekly $2,259.03 $2,328.89 $2,412.48 

7/1/2009 $1,169.05 $1,205.20 $1,248.46 
biweekly $2,338.10 $2,410.41 $2,496.92 



Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 
Police Officer 

7/1/2007 $841.04 $867.05 $893.86 $921.51 $950.01 $979.39 

biweekly $1,682.08 $1,734.10 $1,787.72 $1,843.02 $1,900.02 $1,958.78 

7/1/2008 $870.48 $897.40 $925.15 $953.76 $983.26 $1,013.67 

biweekly $1,740.95 $1,794.79 $1,850.29 $1,907.53 $1,966.52 $2,027.34 

7/1/2009 $900.94 $928.81 $957.53 $987.14 $1,017.67 $1,049.15 

hi weekly $1,801.89 $1,857.61 $1,915.05 $1,974.29 $2,035.35 $2,098.29 



Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 



Dispatche 



7/1/2007 $587.03 $619.70 $650.96 $684.06 $722.67 

biweekly $1,174.06 $1,239.40 $1,301.92 $1,368.13 $1,445.34 

7/1/2008 $603.17 $636.74 $668.86 $702.88 $742.54 

biweekly $1,206.34 $1,273.48 $1,337.72 $1,405.75 $1,485.08 

7/1/2009 $619.76 $654.25 $687.26 $722.21 $762.96 

biweekly $1,239.52 $1,308.50 $1,374.51 $1,444.41 $1,525.92 

Specialist Range 

7/1/2007 $522.29 to $2,986.61 Annual Stipend 

7/1/2008 $540.57 to $3,091.14 Annual Stipend 

7/1/2009 $559.49 to $3,199.33 Annual Stipend 



FIRE DEPARTMENT AS PER CONTRACT 

Lieutenant Firefighter/EMT* 
7/1/2006 Step 1 Step 2 

Hourly 21.82 22.50 

Bi-Weekly 1,832.88 1,889.59 

7/1/2007 
Hourly 22.47 23.17 23.89 24.63 25.39 26.17 

Bi-Weekly 1,887.87 1,946.28 2,006.48 2,068.52 2,132.50 2,198.46 

7/1/2008 
Hourly 23.15 23.87 24.60 25.36 26.15 26.96 

Bi-Weekly 1,944.51 2,004.67 2,066.67 2,130.57 2,196.48 2,264.41 



Firefighter/EMT* 

7/1/2006 Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Step 8 

Hourly $19.71 $20.32 $20.90 $21.54 $22.18 $22.86 $23.53 $24.24 



Step 3 


Step 4 


Step 5 


Step 6 


23.19 


23.91 


24.65 


25.41 


1,948.04 


2,008.27 


2,070.39 


2,134.42 



178 



Bi-Weekly $1,655.64 $1,706.88 $1,755.60 $1,809.36 $1,863.12 $1,920.24 $1,976.52 $2,036.16 

7/1/2007 

Hourly $20.30 $20.93 $21.53 $22.19 $22.85 $23.55 $24.24 $24.97 

Bi-Weekly $1,705.20 $1,758.12 $1,808.52 $1,863.96 $1,919.40 $1,978.20 $2,036.16 $2,097.48 

7/1/2008 

Hourly $20.91 $21.56 $22.18 $22.86 $23.54 $24.26 $24.97 $25.72 

Bi-Weekly 1756.44 $1,811.04 $1,863.12 $1,920.24 $1,977.36 $2,037.84 $2,097.48 $2,160.48 

* Based on a 42 hour week. 



PUBLIC SAFETY POSITIONS 

Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Step 8 

Call Firefighter/EMT $21.43 $22.09 $22.74 $23.42 $24.12 $24.86 $25.59 $26.36 



Animal Control Officer/Inspector 

* Based on a 40-hour workweek 



Step 1 
Step 6 

$19.46 

$22.38 



Step 2 
Step 7 

$20.02 
$23.02 



Step 3 
Step 8 

$20.57 
$23.67 



Step 4 Step 5 

Step 9 

$21.17 $21.76 

$24.33 



Assistant Animal Control Officer $1,938.27 $2,117.98 $2,297.70 $2,476.21 
♦Annual Stipend $2,839.25 $3,017.76 $3,232.45 



$2,659.53 



MANAGERIAL POSITIONS 



Grade Level I 

Administrative Asst. to the Selectmen/Town 
Administrator 



Minimum Midpoint Maximum 

$45,921 $51,778 S57,635 



Grade Level II 

No positions at this level 



51.661 



57.401 



63,142 



Grade Level III 

Council on Aging Director 



57,401 



63,142 



,882 



Grade Level IV 

Park and Recreation Director 



63,142 



68,882 



74,622 



Grade Level V 

Asst Town Administrator 
Principal Assessor 
Town Accountant 
Library Director 
Treasurer 



68,882 


77.491 


86,102 


68,882 


77,308 


86.102 


68,882 


77,308 


86.102 


68,882 


77,308 


86.102 


68,882 


77.308 


86.102 



Grade Level V 



No positions at this level 










74.622 


83,231 


91.S41 


Grade Level VII 
















Fire Chief 










91,841 


109.062 


126,282 


Police Chief* 










91,842 


109.061 


126,282 


Superintendent of Public 


Works 








91.842 


109.061 


126.2S2 


'Receives additional 20% of base 


salary as a result 


of Quinn 


Bill 









Educational Incentive 



179 



OTHER SALARIED POSITIONS 

Grade Level I 

Outreach Social Worker 
Conservation Agent (part-time) 



Minimum Midpoint Maximum 



45,921 
22,961 



51,661 
25,830 



57.401 
28.701 



Grade Level 11 

Director of Youth Outreach 



50.156 



55,729 



61.303 



HOI RLY PAID POSITIONS 



Grade Min Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5 Step 6 Step 7 Step 8 MAX 



10 


9.07 


9.34 


9.60 


9.87 


10.15 


10.44 


10.73 


11.03 


11.35 


20 


14.63 


15.04 


15.46 


15.90 


16.35 


16.82 


17.29 


17.78 


18.28 


30 


16.08 


16.54 


17.01 


17.48 


17.98 


18.49 


19.01 


19.55 


20.10 


40 


17.69 


18.19 


18.70 


19.24 


19.78 


20.34 


20.92 


21.51 


22.11 


50 


19.46 


20.02 


20.58 


21.17 


21.76 


22.38 


23.02 


23.66 


24.33 


60 


21.41 


22.01 


22.64 


23.27 


23.93 


24.61 


25.31 


26.03 


26.76 


70 


23.43 


24.13 


24.85 


25.59 


26.36 


27.15 


27.97 


28.81 


29.67 


80 


25.30 


26.06 


26.84 


27.64 


28.47 


29.32 


30.20 


31.11 


32.04 


90 


27.27 


28.08 


28.92 


29.79 


30.69 


31.60 


32.56 


33.53 


34.53 



HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 



Grade 10 


Grade 50 


Page 


Payroll Administrator 




Administrative Assistant II 


Grade 20 


Circulation Supervisor 


Clerk Typist 


Equipment Operator 


Library Assistant 


Volunteer Coordinator 


Laborer 


Water Technician 


Mini-Bus Driver 




Police Matron 


Grade 60 


Special Police Officer 


Administrative Assistant III 


Traffic Supervisor 


Children's Librarian 




Park and Rec Program Coordinator 


Grade 30 


Reference Librarian 


Office Assistant 




Sr. Library Assistant 


Grade 70 


Truck Driver 


Sr. Equipment Operator 


Transportation Coordinator 


Sr. Groundskeeper 




Water Operator 


Grade 40 


Tree Warden 


Administrative Assistant 


Mechanic 


Elder Outreach Worker 




Groundskeeper 


Grade 80 


Maintenance Technician 


Assistant Foreman 



Grade 90 

Senior Foreman 



180 



SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS- PART TIME/TEMPORARY 



Veterans Agent 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Registrar 

Police Intern 



Police- Private Special Detail 
Tree Climber 

FIRE 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

EMS Coordinator 

Fire Alarm Superintendent 

INSPECTORS 

Inspector of Buildings 
Local Inspector of Buildings 
Gas Inspector 
Assistant Gas Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector 
Assistant Plumbing Inspector 
Wiring Inspector 
Assistant Wiring Inspector 
Zoning Enforcement Officer 
Street Inspector 

PARK AND RECREATION 

Program Director 

Swim Pond Director 

Swim Pond Assistant Director 

Swim Team Coach/Guard 

Assistant Coach/Guard 

Water Safety Instructor 

Lifeguard 

Swim Pond Badge Checker 

Swim Pond Maintenance 

Swim Pond Set-up Workers 

Camp Director 

Camp Specialists 

Counselors 

Jr. Counselor 

Tennis Director 

Tennis Instructor 

Trainee 



Annual 


$7,029 


$2,393 


$177 


$410 to $557 


Hourly 


$29.94 


$19.60 


$3,609 


$2,165 


$1,732 


$1,650 


$751 


$28.05 per inspection 


$5,419 


$727 


$1,493 


$274 


$4,428 


$1,016 


$2,465 


$727 


$28.05 per inspection 


$14.81 per inspection 


$14,270 to $17,011 


$5,943 to $8,163 


$3,965 to $5,444 


$3,302 to $4,489 


$2,1 15 to $3,675 


$2,511 to $3,675 


$2,389 to $3,403 


$793 to $1,225 


$926 to $1,225 


$660 to $2,721 


$2,642 to $5,209 


$1,323 to $5,155 


$1,058 to $2,722 


$265 to $8 17 


$3,965 to $5,444 


$793 to $1,363 


$7.95 


(Personnel Board) 



181 



NOTED: That the PERSONNELL ADMINISTRATION PLAN and 

CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE be approved effective 
JuK 1. 2010, to read as set forth in the warrant. MOTION CARRIES UNAMIOUSLY 
(4/26/2010) 

Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or transfer from 
available funds sums of money requested by the Selectmen or any other Town Officer, 
Board. Commission or Committee to defray operating expenses of the Town for the fiscal 
year commencing July 1, 2010, or such other sums as the Town may determine as 
required by General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTED: To approve the line items not on hold as printed in the warrant report. 
MOTION CARRIES UNANIMOUS (4/26/2010) 

VOTED: To reduce the Assessors-Operations by $250.00 PASSED UNANIMOUS 
(4/26/2010) 

VOTED: To increase Fire & Rescue Operations-Salaries by $13,201. PASSED 
UNANIMOUS (4/26/2010) 

VOTED: To reduce Snow & Ice Salaries by $10,000. PASSED UNANIMOUS 
(4/26/2010) 

VOTED: To appropriate the sum of $49,120,618 to defray the operating expenses of the 
various Town Boards, Committees, Commissions and Departments as printed in the 
Warrant Report and/or as amended by the Town Meeting for the fiscal year commencing 
July 1, 2010 and that to meet said appropriation the following sums be raised and 
appropriated on the fiscal 20 1 1 tax levy or transferred from the accounts or funds as 
follows: 

TAX LEVY $43,866,213 

SCHOOL BUILDING ASSISTANCE 
AUTHORITY BOND ANTICIPATION 

NOTE INTEREST REIMBURSEMENT $98, 1 82 
SCHOOL BUILDING ASSISTANCE 

REIMB. 92 HIGH SCHOOL PROJ. $653,827 
MULTI-SCHOOL PROJECTS $1,183,535 

BOND PERMIUM ON 

$4.2M ISSUE 6/07 $6,947 

CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE 
INTEREST ACCOUNT $40,000 

PENSION RESERVE FUND $100,000 

MASS WATER POLLUTION 
ABATEMENT TRUST TITLE V 
HEALTH SEPTIC LOAN Account 30-034 $4,174 
OVERLAY SURPLUS 
STABILIZATION FUND FOR ADVANCE 
PAYMENTS OF SEWER BETTERMENTS $400,000 

WATER ENTERPRISE FUND $ 1 ,379,467 

SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND $ 1 ,388,273 

TOTAL BUDGET PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE (4/26/2010) 



Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate from the Fiscal 201 1 
Tax Levy and/or transfer from available funds and/or borrow for Capital Expenditures 
including the following: 



182 



FY11 CAPITAL BUDGET 
RECOMMENDATIONS 

DEPARTMENT PROJECT 

Board of Selectmen Aerial Flyover for GIS 

Library Roof Top Air Handler Replacement 

Carpet Replacement 

Fire Department Replace Command Vehicle 

Technology Upgrade 

Conservation Commission Land Acquisition and Maintenance 

School Department 

Wheelock Wheelchair Lift Cafetorium Stage 

Dale Street Window Replacement 

Upgrade Emergency Lighting 

Middle School Replace Intercom System 

District Wide Energy Improvements 

Pick up Truck Replacement 

Police Department Traffic Light Upgrade Program 

Cruiser Replacement 

Public Works Subdivision Resurfacing 

Replace 1994 Ford Pickup 

Water Enterprise Replace Ford 550 Pickup 
Replace Ford 250 Pickup 



Parks and Recreation Replace windows at the Pfaff Center 

John Deere Mower 



(Capital Budget Committee) 



183 



FY 11 CAPITAL BUDGET 



DEPARTMENT 
Board of Selectmen 

Library 



Fire Department 



APPROPRIATIONS 
PROJECT 



REQUEST APPROP. 



Aerial Flyover for GIS 


$10,000 


$10,000 


Roof Top Air Handler 
Replacement 


7,250 


7,250 


Carpet Replacement 


15,000 


15,000 


Replace Command Vehicle 


38,000 


38,000 


Technology Upgrade 


7,500 


7,500 


Land Acquisition 


50,000 


5,000 



Conservation 
Commission 


Land Acquisition 


50,000 


5,000 


School Department 

Wheelock 


Wheelchair Lift 
Cafetorium Stage 


28,800 




Dale Street 


Window Replacement 
Upgrade Emergency 
Lighting 


95,000 
24,650 


68,750 


Middle School 


Replace Intercom System 


31,000 




District Wide 


Energy Improvements 
Pick Up Truck Replacement 


38,000 
29,000 


29, 000 


Police Department 


Traffice Light Upgrade 
Program 


6,000 


6,000 




Cruiser replacement 


33,500 


33,500 


Public Works 


Subdivision Resurfacing 
Replace 1 994 Ford Pickup 


40,000 
50,000 


40,000 
50,000 


Water Enterprise 


Replace Ford Pickup 
Replace ford Pickup 


60,000 
40,000 


60,000 
40,000 


Parks & Recreation 


Replace windows at the 
Pfaff Center 


40,000 


40,000 




John Deer Mower 


16,215 








$659,915 


$450,000 



To be funded by: 

Tax Levy $350,000 

Water and Sewer Enterprise Fund $100,000 

Total $450,000 



VOTED: To raise and appropriate the sum of $450,000 for capital expenditures as 
recommended in the Warrant Report, except that the funds appropriated for the 
Conservation Commission be used for land acquisition only; $350,000 to be raised on the 



184 



fiscal 2011 tax levy, and $100,000 to be transferred from the Water Enterprise Fund. 
PASSED AS STATED. (4/26/2010) 

Article 16. To see if the Town will vote to declare a portion of Town-owned land 
located off North Meadows Road on which the DPW garage is located and shown on 
Assessors' Map 44 as Parcel 14, to be partially surplus and available for disposition 
(lease) PROVIDED THAT any non-municipal use be compatible and not interfere with 
the active ongoing municipal uses and to see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to prepare and issue "Invitation(s) to Bid" or "Requests(s) for Proposals" for 
the disposition (lease) of said portion of land to one or more commercial cable television 
providers for use by them as a cable head-end facility, in accordance with the 
requirements of G.L. Chapter 30B, Section 16. and to enter into a lease or leases with 
said provider(s) for up to twenty (20) years for said use for such annual rent and upon 
such terms and conditions as the Board of Selectmen shall determine to be in the Town's 
best interests, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTED: That the Town declare a portion of Town-owned land located off North 
Meadows Road on which the DPW garage is located and shown on Assessors' Map 44 as 
Parcel 14, to be partially surplus and available for disposition (lease) PROVIDED THAT 
any non-municipal use be compatible and not interfere with the active ongoing municipal 
uses and to see if the Town will authorize the Board of Selectmen to prepare and issue 
"Invitation(s) to Bid" or "Requests(s) for Proposals" for the disposition (lease) of said 
portion of land to one or more commercial cable television providers for use by them as a 
cable head-end facility, in accordance with the requirements of G.L. Chapter 30B, 
Section 16, and to enter into a lease or leases with said provider(s) for up to twenty (20) 
years for said use for such annual rent and upon such terms and conditions as the Board 
of Selectmen shall determine to be in the Town's best interests. PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE 
(4/26/2010) 

Article 17. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money from the 
Ambulance Mileage Fee Fund to the Stabilization Fund to reimburse the Stabilization 
Fund for a portion of the funds advanced to assist with the purchase of an ambulance, 
purchased under the authorization of Article 26 of the 2008 Annual Town Meeting, or do 
or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Town Accountant) 

VOTED: To appropriate SI 9,000 from the Ambulance Mileage Fee Fund to the 
Stabilization Fund to reimburse the Stabilization Fund for a portion of the funds 
advanced to assist with the purchase of an ambulance, purchased under the authorization 
of Article 26 of the 2008 Annual Town Meeting. PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE (4/26/2010) 

Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to transfer $212,583 from sewer betterments 
paid in advance to the Sewer Stabilization Fund, established under Article 31 of the 2004 
ATM in accordance with the provisions of G.L., Chapter 40, Section 5B as amended by 
Chapter 46 of the Acts of 2003, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Town Accountant) 

VOTED: That the Town transfer 5212,583 from sewer betterments paid in advance to 
the Sewer Stabilization Fund, established under Article 31 of the 2004 ATM in 
accordance with the provisions of G.L. , Chapter 40, Section 5B as amended by Chapter 
46 of the Acts of 2003. PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE (4/26/2010) 

Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from the Retiree 
Health Insurance Trust Fund to the Unfunded Retiree Health Insurance Stabilization 
Fund, established under Article 26 of the 2006 ATM for the purpose of setting aside 
monies to cover the unfunded retiree health insurance costs in accordance with the 
provisions of G.L. , Chapter 40 Section 5B as amended by Chapter 46 of the Acts of 2003. 
or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Town Administrator) 



185 



VOTED: That the Town transfer $100,000 from the Retiree Health Insurance 
Stabilization Fund, established under Article 26 of the 2006 ATM for the purpose of 
setting aside monies to cover the unfunded retiree health insurance costs in accordance 
with the provisions of G.L., Chapter 40 Section 5B as amended by Chapter 46 of the Acts 
of 2003 PASSED BY 2/3 MAJORITY (4/26/2010) 

Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money and determine in 
\\ hat manner said sum shall be raised for the purpose of hiring consultants to advise the 
Town on matters concerning the disposition and reuse of the former Medfield State 
Hospital property, said funds to be expended under the direction of the Board of 
Selectmen, with the understanding that the Board of Selectmen may authorize any other 
Town board, commission, committee or department to expend a portion of said funds for 
such purposes, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTED: To appropriate $75,000, said sum to be raised on the fyll tax levy, for the 
purpose of hiring consultants to advise the Town on matters concerning the disposition 
and reuse of the former Medfield State Hospital property, said funds to be expended 
under the direction of the Board of Selectmen, with the understanding that the Board of 
Selectmen may authorize any other Town board, commission, committee or department 
to expend a portion of said funds for such purposes. MOTION CARRIES (4/26/2010) 

Article 21. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Town of Medfield Zoning By- 
Law, Section 17: Personal Wireless Communications Facilities , by striking the existing 
section and replacing it with a new section containing revisions summarized as follows: 

17. 1 Purpose : Expand purposes of By-Law to include aesthetic considerations. 

17.2 Definitions : Clarify existing definitions and add new definitions including 
"Personal Wireless Equipment," "Application" and "Applicant." 

17.3 Location : Revise permitted locations, types of facilities allowed, and, consistent 
with federal law, authorize placement of facilities outside specified locations to 
avoid an effective prohibition of applicant's provision of wireless services. 

1 7.4 General Requirements : Clarify requirements and provide new enforcement 
mechanisms. 

17.5 Application Process : Clarify existing submittal requirements and add new 
requirements including provision for peer review at applicant's expense. 

17.6 Design Guidelines : Clarify and tighten dimensional requirements and limitations 
including maximum height and minimum setbacks and distances. 

1 7.7 Special Permit Review : Set out detailed criteria which applicant must address to 
Zoning Board of Appeal's satisfaction including need for service, facility, and 
location, type of facility, impact upon aesthetics and environment and 
minimization thereof, provision for future capacity, and compliance with federal 
and state statutes and regulations. 

1 7.8 Invalidity : Add new section containing saving provision. 

A copy of the complete text of the proposed amendment being on file and available for 
public inspection at the Medfield Town House in the Town Clerk's office and copies also 
being available for public inspection in the Planning Board's office and at the Memorial 
Public Library, 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 



186 



VOTED: To amend the Town of Medfield Zoning By-law, Section 17: Personal 
Wireless Communications Facilities , by striking the existing section and replacing it with 
a new section containing revisions summarized in the warrant, a copy of the complete 
text of the proposed amendment being on file and available for public inspection at the 
Medfield Town House in the Town Clerk's office and copies also being available for 
public inspection in the Planning Board's office and at the Memorial Public Library, as 
well as at tonight's meeting, with the following change in Sections 17.3.7, 17.3.8, and 
17.7.1: strike "Sections 17.3.1 and 17.3.2" wherever they appear in those sections and 
replace with "Sections 17.3.1, 17.3.2 and 17.3.6". PASSED BY 2/3 MAJORITY 
(4/26/2010) 



Article 22. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public ways the following named 
streets, or parts thereof: 

Baker Road from Station 0+0 to Station 7+0 
Richard Road from Station 0+0 to Station 2+18 
Brastow Drive from Station 0+0 to Station 2+32 

As laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on a plan referred to in the Order of 
Layout on file with the Town Clerk's office and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, titles and easements, including 
drainage easements, as may be necessary to accomplish such purposes, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

It Was So VOTED: PASSED BY 2/3 VOTE (4/26/2010) 



Article 23. To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Assessors to use a sum of 
money from free cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate for the fiscal year 
201 1, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTED: That the Town Authorize the Board of Assessors to use $500,000 from free 
cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate for the fiscal year 201 1. MOTION 
CARRIED (4/26/2010) 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in the 
usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield, seven days at least before the time of 
holding said Town Meeting. 



Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant with your doings thereon, unto the 
Town Clerk at the time and place of the Town Meeting aforesaid. Given unto our hands 
this 16 th day of March Two-Thousand and Ten. 



Ann B. Thompson, Chairman S/ 

Mark L. Fisher S/ 

Osier L. Peterson S/ 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

By virtue of this Warrant, I have notified and warned the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Medfield, qualified to vote in elections and at town meetings, by posting attested copies 
of the same at five public places seven days before the date of the elections as within 
directed. 

Constable: Wayne Sallale S/ A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 

Date: March 17, 2010 Carol Mayer, CMC. CMMC S 



187 



WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 

SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

SEPTEMBER 14, 2010 



ss. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn 
the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to vote at the 
CENTER at Medfield, Ice House Road on TUESDAY, THE FOURTEENTH 
DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2010 from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following 
purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the candidates of political parties for 
the following offices: 



GOVERNOR 

LT. GOVERNOR 

ATTORNEY GENERAL 

SECRETARY OF STATE 

TREASURER 

AUDITOR 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

COUNCILLOR 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT... 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

SHERIFF 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 



FOR THIS 

COMMONWEALTH 

FOR THIS 

COMMONWEALTH 

FOR THIS 

COMMONWEALTH 

FOR THIS 

COMMONWEALTH 

FOR THIS 

COMMONWEALTH 

FOR THIS 

COMMONWEALTH 

9 th DISTRICT 

2 nd DISTRICT 

NORFOLK & BRISTOL 

DISTRICT 

9 th & 13 th DISTRICT 

NORFOLK DISTRICT 

NORFOLK COUNTY 

NORFOLK COUNTY 



188 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, in 
the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield seven days at least before 
the time of holding said State Election. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, 
unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of the State Primary Election 
aforesaid. Given unto our hands this 17 th day of August, 2010 



Mark Fisher S/ 
Osier Peterson S/ 
Ann Thompson S/ 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the Town 
of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose 
named, by posting attested copies of said warrant in not less than five public 
places in the Town of Medfield at least seven days before the time of holding the 
meeting. 

Constable: Larz Anderson S/ 
Date: August 18,2010 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 
Carol A Mayer s/, CMC, CMMC 
Town Clerk 



189 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

STATE PRIMARY 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2010 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 AM with 
reading of the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. The 
ballot boxes were inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots 
posted, voting list was displayed and instruction to the voters were posted. 

WARDEN: Emmy Mitchell 

TELLERS: Al Allegretto, John Hand Joanne Surette, Patricia Rioux, Rita 
Allegretto, Jane Timmerman, Lisa Donovan and Muffy Smick 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 1526. Total registered voters numbered 8328, 5% of the 
voters voting. After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were as 
follows: 

DEMOCRAT BALLOTS PRECINCT 



1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAL 


GOVERNOR 










Deval L Patrick 202 


177 


131 


129 


639 


Write In 5 


3 


2 


2 


12 


Blanks 61 


71 


55 


56 


243 
894 


LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 










Timothy P Murray 203 


182 


126 


125 


636 


Write In 1 








1 


2 


Blanks 64 


69 


62 


61 


256 
894 


ATTORNEY GENERAL 











Martha Coakley 192 184 137 129 642 

Write In 3 3 3 9 

Blanks 73 64 48 58 243 

894 



190 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



William Francis Galvin 


204 


186 


141 


134 


665 


Write In 








2 





2 


Blanks 


64 


65 


45 


53 


227 
894 


TREASURER 












Steven Grossman 


166 


167 


110 


109 


552 


Stephen J Murphy 


70 


51 


47 


51 


219 


Write In 

















Blanks 


32 


33 


31 


27 


123 
894 


AUDITOR 












Suzanne M Bump 


111 


106 


76 


83 


376 


Guy William Glodis 


54 


40 


39 


36 


169 


Mike Lake 


58 


53 


37 


37 


185 


Write In 








1 





1 


Blanks 


45 


52 


35 


31 


163 
894 


REPRESENTATIVE IN CO 


89 


91 




Stephen F Lynch 


134 


121 


435 


Macdonald K 


129 


124 


93 


89 


435 


D'Alessandro 












Write In 

















Blanks 


5 


6 


6 


7 


24 
894 


COUNCILLOR 












Kelly A Timilty 


139 


129 


99 


87 


454 


Robert L Jubinville 


75 


74 


52 


63 


264 


Write In 

















Blanks 


54 


48 


37 


37 


176 
894 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 


167 


122 


116 




James E Timilty 


184 


589 


Write In 


3 











3 


Blanks 


81 


84 


66 


71 


302 
894 


REPRSENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 








Denise C Garlick (1 & 


161 


147 


308 


2) 












Gary B McNeill (1 & 2) 


33 


31 






64 


Gerald A Wasserman ( 


54 


58 






112 


1 &2) 













191 



Stanley J Nacewicz ( 3 

&4) 

Write In 

Blanks 




20 



108 

1 
79 



108 


79 



216 

1 
193 
894 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY 



Michael Chinman 


45 


43 


32 


42 


162 


Joseph R Driscoll, Jr 


115 


105 


77 


74 


371 


Michael W Morrissey 


61 


55 


45 


39 


200 


Write In 


1 





2 


1 


4 


Blanks 


46 


48 


32 


31 


157 
894 


SHERIFF 












Michael G Bellotti 


179 


166 


124 


110 


579 


Write In 

















Blanks 


89 


85 


64 


77 


315 
894 


COUNTY COMMISSIONER 










Peter H Collins 


170 


159 


117 


101 


547 


Write In 

















Blanks 


98 


92 


71 


86 


347 
894 


REPUBLICAN BALLOTS 












GOVERNOR 












Charles Baker 


146 


151 


135 


144 


576 


Write In 


1 


4 


3 


1 


9 


Blanks 


18 


13 


8 


8 


47 
632 


LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 










Richard Tisei 


126 


135 


130 


135 


526 


Write In 





4 


2 


1 


7 


Blanks 


39 


29 


14 


17 


99 
632 


ATTORNEY GENERAL 












James McKenna 


16 


31 


22 


16 


85 


Guy Carbone 


8 


15 


10 


13 


46 


Write In 


4 


2 


3 


4 


13 


Blanks 


137 


120 


111 


120 


488 
632 


SECRETARY OF STATE 













William Campbell 
Write In 
Blanks 



117 



48 



130 


38 



120 



26 



122 

1 

30 



489 
148 
142 
632 



192 



TREASURER 



Karyn Polito 


125 


140 


124 


125 


514 


Write In 





2 


2 





4 


Blanks 


40 


26 


20 


28 


114 
632 


AUDITOR 












Mary Connaughton 


136 


144 


127 


131 


537 


Kamal Jain 


7 


12 


8 


9 


36 


Write In 

















Blanks 


23 


12 


11 


13 


59 
632 


REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 


73 


77 




Vernon Harrison 


70 


71 


291 


Keith Lepor 


54 


67 


54 


42 


217 


Write In 


2 


1 








3 


Blanks 


39 


29 


19 


34 


121 
632 


COUNCILLOR 












Steven Glovsky 


103 


123 


110 


120 


456 


Write In 


1 











1 


Blanks 


61 


45 


36 


33 


175 
632 


SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 








2 




Write In 


1 


3 


Blanks 


164 


168 


146 


151 


629 
632 


REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 








Joshua Levy (P 1 & 2) 


45 


61 


117 


JohnO'Leary(Pl & 2) 


88 


99 






187 


Daniel Winslow (P 3 & 






120 


124 


244 


4) 












Write In 

















Blanks 


21 


8 


26 


29 


84 
632 


DISTRICT ATTORNEY 












Write In 





1 


3 





4 


Blanks 


165 


167 


143 


153 


628 
632 


SHERIFF 













William Farretta 
Write In 
Blanks 



104 125 



61 43 



107 



39 



115 

1 
37 



451 

1 

180 

632 



193 



1 


3 





4 


67 


143 


153 


628 
632 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER 
Write In 

Blanks 165 



NO LIBERTARIAN BALLOTS WERE CAST 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. After the results were announced, the ballots 
checked, voting lists and tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for 
safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST 



Carol A. Mayer s\, CMC, CMMC 
TOWN CLERK 
September 16,2010 



194 



WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN 

SECRETARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH 

NOVEMBER 2, 2010 



ss. 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield, 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn 
the inhabitants of said town who are qualified to vote in Elections to vote at 
the CENTER at Medfield, Ice House Road on TUESDAY, THE SECOND 
DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2010 from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following 
purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the candidates of political parties 
for the following offices: 



GOVERNOR 

LT. GOVERNOR 

ATTORNEY GENERAL. . . 
SECRETARY OF STATE. . . 
TREASURER.... 

AUDITOR 

REPRESENTATIVE IN 

CONGRESS 

COUNCILLOR 

SENATOR IN GENERAL 

COURT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN 
GENERAL COURT 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

SHERIFF 

COUNTY 
COMMISSIONERS 



FOR THIS 
FOR THIS 
FOR THIS 
FOR THIS 
FOR THIS 
FOR THIS 



COMMONWEALTH 
COMMONWEALTH 
COMMONWEALTH 
COMMONWEALTH 
COMMONWEALTH 
COMMONWEALTH 
9 th DISTRICT 



2 nd DISTRICT 



NORFOLK & BRISTOL DISTRICT 



9 TH & 13 th DISTRICT 



NORFOLK DISTRICT 
NORFOLK COUNTY 
NORFOLK COUNTY 



QUESTION 1: LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by 
the Senate or the House of Representatives before May 4, 2010? 

SUMMARY 



195 



This proposed law would remove the Massachusetts sales tax on alcoholic 

beverages and alcohol, where the sale of such beverages and alcohol or their 

importation into the state is already subject to a separate excise tax under state 

law. The proposed law would take effect on January 1, 201 1. 

A YES VOTE would remove the state sales tax on alcoholic beverages and 

alcohol where their sale or importation into the state is subject to an excise tax 

under state law. 

A NO VOTE would make no change in the state sales tax on alcoholic 

beverages and alcohol. 

QUESTION 2: LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by 

the Senate or the House of Representatives before May 4, 2010? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would repeal an existing state law that allows a qualified 
organization wishing to build government-subsidized housing that includes low- 
or moderate-income units to apply for a single comprehensive permit from a city 
or town's zoning board of appeals (ZBA), instead of separate permits from each 
local agency or official having jurisdiction over any aspect of the proposed 
housing. The repeal would take effect on January 1, 201 1, but would not stop or 
otherwise affect any proposed housing that had already received both a 
comprehensive permit and a building permit for at least one unit. 

Under the existing law, the ZBA holds a public hearing on the application 
and considers the recommendations of local agencies and officials. The ZBA 
may grant a comprehensive permit that may include conditions or requirements 
concerning the height, site plan, size, shape, or building materials of the housing. 
Persons aggrieved by the ZBA's decision to grant a permit may appeal it to a 
court. If the ZBA denies the permit or grants it with conditions or requirements 
that make the housing uneconomic to build or to operate, the applicant may 
appeal to the state Housing Appeals Committee (HAC). 

After a hearing, if the HAC rules that the ZBA's denial of a comprehensive 
permit was unreasonable and not consistent with local needs, the HAC orders 
the ZBA to issue the permit. If the HAC rules that the ZBA's decision issuing a 
comprehensive permit with conditions or requirements made the housing 
uneconomic to build or operate and was not consistent with local needs, the 
HAC orders the ZBA to modify or remove any such condition or requirement so 
as to make the proposal no longer uneconomic. The HAC cannot order the ZBA 
to issue any permit that would allow the housing to fall below minimum safety 
standards or site plan requirements. If the HAC rules that the ZBA's action was 
consistent with local needs, the HAC must uphold it even if it made the housing 



196 



uneconomic. The HAC's decision is subject to review in the courts. 

A condition or requirement makes housing "uneconomic" if it would 
prevent a public agency or non-profit organization from building or operating 
the housing except at a financial loss, or it would prevent a limited dividend 
organization from building or operating the housing without a reasonable return 
on its investment. 

A ZBA's decision is "consistent with local needs" if it applies requirements 
that are reasonable in view of the regional need for low- and moderate-income 
housing and the number of low-income persons in the city or town, as well as 
the need to protect health and safety, promote better site and building design, 
and preserve open space, if those requirements are applied as equally as possible 
to both subsidized and unsubsidized housing. Requirements are considered 
"consistent with local needs" if more than 10% of the city or town's housing 
units are low- or moderate-income units or if such units are on sites making up at 
least 1.5% of the total private land zoned for residential, commercial, or 
industrial use in the city or town. Requirements are also considered "consistent 
with local needs" if the application would result, in any one calendar year, in 
beginning construction of low- or moderate-income housing on sites making up 
more than 0.3% of the total private land zoned for residential, commercial, or 
industrial use in the city or town, or on ten acres, whichever is larger. 

The proposed law states that if any of its parts were declared invalid, the 
other parts would stay in effect. 

A YES VOTE would repeal the state law allowing the issuance of a single 
comprehensive permit to build housing that includes low- or moderate-income 
units. 

A NO VOTE would make no change in the state law allowing issuance of such 
a comprehensive permit. 

QUESTION 3: LAW PROPOSED BY INITIATIVE PETITION 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote was taken by 
the Senate or the House of Representatives before May 4, 2010? 

SUMMARY 

This proposed law would reduce the state sales and use tax rates (which 
were 6.25% as of September 2009) to 3% as of January 1, 201 1. It would make 
the same reduction in the rate used to determine the amount to be deposited 
with the state Commissioner of Revenue by non-resident building contractors 
as security for the payment of sales and use tax on tangible personal property 
used in carrying out their contracts. 

The proposed law provides that if the 3% rates would not produce enough 
revenues to satisfy any lawful pledge of sales and use tax revenues in connection 



197 



with any bond, note, or other contractual obligation, then the rates would instead 
be reduced to the lowest level allowed by law. 

The proposed law would not affect the collection of moneys due the 
Commonwealth for sales, storage, use or other consumption of tangible 
personal property or services occurring before January 1, 201 1. 

The proposed law states that if any of its parts were declared invalid, 
the other parts would stay in effect. 

A YES VOTE would reduce the state sales and use tax rates to 3%. 
A NO VOTE would make no change in the state sales and use tax rates. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an attested copy thereof, 
in the usual place for posting warrants in said Medfield seven days at least 
before the time of holding said State Election. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your doings thereon, 
unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of the State Primary Election 
aforesaid. Given unto our hands this 19th day of October, 2010 



Mark Fisher, S/ 
Osier Peterson, S/ 
Ann Thompson, S/ 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the inhabitants of the 
Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in elections, to meet at the time and for 
the purpose named, by posting attested copies of said warrant in not less than 
five public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven days before the time 
of holding the meeting. 

Constable: Ray Burton, S/ 
Date: October 20, 2010 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 
Carol A Mayer S/, CMC, CMMC 
Town Clerk 



198 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

STATE ELECTION 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2010 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 6:00 AM with 
reading of the warrant and the swearing in of the election workers present. 
The ballot boxes were inspected and found to be in working order, specimen 
ballots posted, voting list was displayed and instruction to the voters were 
posted. 

WARDEN: Emmy Mitchell 

TELLERS: Al Allegretto, Ruth Chick, Rita Allegretto, Jane Timmerman, Lisa 
Donovan, Steve Catanese, Muffy Smick, Nonyem Aduba, Kate Tormey and 
Shiela Roy 
The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 5898. Total registered voters numbered 8,395, 70% of the 
voters voting. After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results were 
as follows: 



PRECINCT 



GOVERNOR and LIEUTENANT 
GOVERNOR 

Patrick and Murray 
Baker and Tisei 
Cahill and Loscocco 
Stein and Purcell 
Write In 
Blanks 



ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Martha Coakley 
James P. McKenna 
Write In 
Blanks 



1 


2 


3 


4 


TOTAL 


588 


540 


555 


510 


2193 


752 


838 


892 


804 


3286 


84 


68 


56 


78 


286 


25 


17 


20 


16 


78 

















12 


18 


12 


13 


55 
5898 


832 


797 


785 


712 


3126 


591 


643 


710 


664 


2608 





1 


2 





3 


38 


40 


38 


45 


161 
5898 



199 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



William Francis Galvin 
William C. Campbell 
James D. Henderson 
Write In 
Blanks 



TREASURER 

Steven Grossman 
Karyn E. Polito 
Write In 
Blanks 



AUDITOR 

Suzanne M. Bump 
Mary Z. Connaughton 
Nathanael Alexander Fortune 
Write In 
Blanks 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

Stephen F. Lynch 
Vernon M. Harrison 
Philip Dunkelbarger 
Write In 
Blanks 



COUNCILLOR 

Kelly A. Timilty 
Steven M. Glovsky 
Richard Mitchell 
Write In 
Blanks 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

James E. Timilty 
Write In 
Blanks 



823 


792 


808 


723 


2146 


534 


591 


622 


594 


2341 


34 


23 


30 


24 


111 








1 





1 


70 


75 


74 


80 


299 
5898 


709 


647 


630 


575 


2561 


685 


759 


831 


760 


3035 

















67 


75 


74 


86 


302 
5898 


498 


451 


448 


393 


1790 


783 


861 


912 


848 


3404 


66 


38 


57 


47 


208 











1 


1 


114 


131 


118 


132 


495 
5898 


827 


780 


760 


708 


3075 


474 


539 


595 


543 


2151 


86 


80 


106 


105 


377 

















74 


82 


74 


65 


295 
5898 


653 


612 


628 


543 


2436 


576 


648 


709 


660 


2593 


82 


68 


67 


67 


284 





1 





1 


2 


150 


152 


131 


150 


583 
5898 


961 


927 


955 


854 


3697 


11 


12 


11 


10 


44 


489 


542 


569 


557 


2157 
5898 



200 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

DeniseC. Garlick(l & 2) 
John P. O'LearyU & 2) 
Stanley J. Nacewicz (3 & 4) 
Daniel B. Winslow (3 & 4) 
Write In 
Blanks 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

Michael W. Morrissey 
John F. Coffey 
Write In 
Blanks 



SHERIFF 

Michael G. Bellotti 
William J. Farretta 
Write In 
Blanks 



COUNTY COMMISSIIONER 

Peter H. Collins 
Write In 
Blanks 



717 


650 






1367 


678 


757 






1435 






491 


435 


926 






894 


845 


1739 











1 


1 


66 


74 


150 


140 


430 
5898 


591 


540 


565 


510 


2206 


683 


776 


788 


724 


2971 


1 





3 





4 


186 


165 


179 


187 


717 
5898 


736 


675 


709 


641 


2761 


573 


660 


687 


614 


2534 


1 


3 








4 


151 


143 


139 


166 


599 
5898 


903 


899 


913 


808 


3523 


8 


8 


8 


6 


30 


550 


574 


614 


607 


2345 
5898 



QUESTION 1 - REMOVE SALES TAX ON ALCOHOL BEVERAGES 
YES - 3066 NO- 2496 BLANKS- 336 

QUESTION 2 - REPEAL 40B 

YES - 2939 NO - 2596 BLANKS- 363 

QUESTION 3 - REDUCE SALES TAX TO 3% 
YES -2568 NO -3156 BLANKS -174 

QUESTION 4 - SALE OF MARIJUANA 
YES -2950 NO -2335 BLANKS - 613 



201 



The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. After the results were announced, the 
ballots checked, voting lists and tally sheets were turned over to the Town 
Clerk for safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST 



Carol A. Mayer s\, CMC, CMMC 
TOWN CLERK 
November 3, 2010 



202 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 2010 



203 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
COMPARATIVE FINANCIAL REPORTS 
2009. 2010 and 2011 



2009 1 Residential 

2 Open Space 

3 Commercial 

4 Industrial 

5 Personal Property 


4074 



123 

42 

81 


$2,179,652,686.00 

$0.00 

$66,794,464.00 

$26,063,900.00 

$29,371,000.00 


Total Real and Personal Property 


4320 


$2,301,882,050.00 


Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 




$31,881,066.40 

$267,679.40 

$13.85 


2010 1 Residential 

2 Open Space 

3 Commercial 

4 Industrial 

5 Personal Property 


4086 



136 

43 

72 


$2,164,473,796.00 

$0.00 

$68,487,743.00 

$26,770,900.00 

$32,161,700.00 


Total Real and Personal Property 


4337 


$2,291,894,139.00 


Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 




$32,636,572.55 

$211,438.55 

$14.24 


2011 1 Residential 

2 Open Space 

3 Commercial 

4 Industrial 

5 Personal Property 


4089 



146 

43 

76 


$2,117,748,105.00 

$0.00 

$67,705,845.00 

$27,214,700.00 

$33,440,500.00 


Total Real and Personal Property 


4354 


$2,246,109,150.00 


Tax Levy 

Overlay 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 




$33,736,559.43 

$197,252.43 

$15.02 



204 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Taxes Receivable as of June 30, 2010 



Fiscal Year 


Real Estate 


Personal Property 


Excise Tax 


2010 


$391,765 


$615 


$49,203 


2009 


63,654 


1,017 


11,541 


2008 


31,027 


1,817 


5,432 


2007 





752 


8,611 


Prior Years 


9,725 


3,227 





Tax Title 


$46,799 







Respectfully submitted, 

Georgia K. Colivas, 
Treasurer/Collector 



205 



TOWN TREASURER 

TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 

Funds in Custody of the Town Treasurer: 

Retirement/Pension $4,009,500.73 

Conservation 38,88 1 .24 

Stabilization 521,906.90 

Special Unemployment Insurance 112,224.90 

Library Trusts 26,943.87 

Granville Dailey-Library 80,561.12 

Madelyn L. Grant Library Fund 72,858.80 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 842,966.44 

Gloria Lynn Library Scholarship 5,842.3 1 

Municipal Insurance 293,767.47 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarship 143,028.89 

Council on Aging 2,647.99 

Palumbo Sports Fund 3.82 

Stabilization- Advanced Sewer Bet. Payments 2,307,083.27 

Moses Ellis Post #117 G.A.R. 13,492.94 

Medfield Antiquities Trust 5,969. 19 

Tri-Centennial Trust 3,592.19 

School Essay Fund 5,01 1.27 

Allendale Sewer Pumping Station Fund 64,888.29 

Dela Park Acres Trust 1 4,450.00 

Cedarview Acres 19,262.46 

Carruth Sewer District 7,28 1 .95 

Maude Washburn Trust Fund 4,888. 1 

Playground Trust 1,139.04 

Elderly and Disabled Trust 2,690.57 

375 th Anniversary Trust 1 ,394.95 

Stabilization-OPEB 106,427.69 



206 



Elizabeth Busconi Trust 34,033.71 

J.M McCormick Scholarship Trust 41,365.75 

Balance June 30, 2010 $8,784,105.85 



Respectfully submitted, 

Georgia K. Colivas, CCMT. Treasurer Collector 



207 



TOWN TREASURER 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Statement of Cash 

Receipts Fiscal Year 2010 
Including investment $52,634,418.12 

returns 

Disbursements Fiscal Year 
2010 
Including reinvestments $54,925,284.71 

Cash Balance on June 30, $23,420,270.58 

2010 

General Fund 



Statement of Investments 

Pooled Investment Fund 

Investments with MMDT $1,864,883.19 

June 30, 2010 

Total Cash, Savings and Investments June $25,243,653.04 

30,2010 

General Fund 

Statement of Interest Received on Savings/Investments-General Fund 

General Fund $69,280.42 

Pooled Investment Fund $5 1 ,944.52 

Total Interest Earned in Fiscal $ 1 2 1 ,224.94 

2010 



Outstanding Debt Accounts June 30, 2010 

Debt Exclusion: 

Town Land Acquisition 2,229,300 

Sewers 7,140,755 

School Construction 1 ,445,000 



208 



Library Renovation 689,000 

Additional School Roofs 3 1 4,600 

HS/Middle School/Memorial Construction 23,250,000 

Adult Community Center 2,320,000 



Non-Exclusion: 

Adult Community Center 1 20,000 

Town Hall Renovation 833,000 

Cap Landfill 323,700 

Athletic Facilities 20,400 

School Lift Installation 70,000 

Land Acquisitions 1 ,4 1 8,750 

Health Septic Loans (MWPAT) 4 1 ,370 

DPW 115,000 

Fire Truck 300,000 

Enterprise Fund: 

Well No. 6 500,900 

Water Treatment Plant 1 53,700 

Causeway Water Main 480,000 

W WTP Improvements 1 ,3 80,000 

Forest St. Water Main 1 29,404 

1 1 Reduction-MWPAT 978,842 

Granite Street Water Main 400,000 

Total Long Term Debt (principal only) $44,653,721 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Georgia K. Colivas 
Treasurer/Collector 



209 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

BALANCE SHEET FOR 20 1 1 3 

FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2010 



FUND: 01 GENERAL FUND 



ACCOUNT 
BALANCE 



ASM IS 



01 


101000 


01 


121005 


01 


121006 


01 


121007 


01 


121008 


01 


121009 


01 


121010 


01 


122000 


01 


122001 


01 


122002 


01 


122006 


01 


122008 


01 


122009 


01 


122010 


01 


123005 


01 


123006 


01 


123007 


01 


123008 


01 


123009 


01 


123010 


01 


124000 


01 


125300 


01 


126108 


01 


126109 


01 


126110 


01 


134002 


01 


136000 


01 


143101 


01 


143102 


01 


143103 


01 


143104 


01 


143108 


01 


143109 


01 


143110 


01 


143900 


01 


143918 


01 


161010 


01 


161033 


01 


161080 


01 


171000 




TOTAL ASSETS 



CASH 

2005 PP TAX RECBL 

2006 PP TAX RECBL 

2007 PP TAX RECBL 

2008 PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX REC 

2009 PERSONAL PROPERTY TX REC 

2010 PERSONAL PROP TX REC 

2000 RE TAX RECB-CH59 

2001 RE TAX RECB-CH59 

2002 RE TAX RECB-CH59 
2006 RE TAX RECB-CH59 

2008 REAL ESTATE TAX REC-CH59 

2009 REAL ESTATE TAX REC-CH59 

2010 REAL ESTATE TAX REC-CH-59 
PROV FOR ABATE/EXEMP-2005 
PROV FOR ABATE/EXEMP-2006 
PROV FOR ABATE/EXEMP-2007 
PROV FOR ABATE/EXEMP-2008 
PROV FOR ABATE/EXEMP-2009 
PROV FOR ABATE/EXEMP-2010 
TAX TITLE RECBL 

DEF TAX RECBL ch59s5cl41A 

2008 MVE RECBL-CH60A 

2009 MVE RECBL-CH60A 

2010 MVE RECBL-CH60A 

AMB CHG BILLING AGENCY RECBL 
POLICE SPEC DETAIL RECBL 

2001 APP SEW BETT ATTX 

2002 APP SEW BETT ATTX 

2003 APP SEW BETT ATTX 

2004 APP SEW BETT ATTX 

2008 APP SEWER BETT ADD TO TAX 

2009 APP SEW BETT ADD TO TAX 

2010 APP SEW BETT ADD TO TAX 
COMM INT SB ATTX 

APPORT SEW BETT NOT YET DUE 

CH SHT-NON RECUR REC 

DF CH90 FUND-33 

DF TRUST+STAB FD-80 

DUE FROM FEDERAL GOVT/PILOT 



25,226,153.68 

1,771.01 

1,455.60 

751.97 

1,816.79 

1,071.07 

614.87 

1,437.92 

2,294.18 

2,487.72 

3,505.55 

31,026.52 

63,653.93 

391,764.61 

-9,906.77 

-16,229.93 

-15,139.30 

-18,981.54 

-62,674.62 

-78,526.45 

46,799.03 

134,249.08 

5,431.99 

11,541.08 

49,203.01 

118,708.52 

7,092.34 

116.95 

116.95 

116.95 

116.95 

2,677.42 

419.45 

8,886.86 

5,358.59 

6,060,786.41 

18,450.00 

10,774.47 

97,516.82 

1,113.00 



32,107,822.68 



210 



LIABILITIES 




01 


120000 


01 


124001 


01 


125301 


01 


126000 


01 


134100 


01 


136100 


01 


143925 


01 


143926 


01 


201000 


01 


222200 


01 


222600 


01 


223000 


01 


223100 


01 


226800 


01 


227010 


01 


227011 


01 


238020 


01 


238021 


01 


238030 


01 


238031 


01 


238032 


01 


238040 


01 


238060 


01 


238061 


01 


238069 


01 


252000 


01 


252010 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

BALANCE SHEET FOR 20 1 1 3 

FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2010 



DEF REV-PROP TAX 
DEF REV-TAX TITLE 
DEF REV-DEFERRED TX 
DEF REV-MVE TAX 
DEF REV-AMBULANCE 
DEF REV-POL SPEC DETAIL 
DEF REV-SPECIAL BETT 
DEF REV-SB NOT YET DUE 
WARRANTS PAYABLE 
PAYR P-VOL LIFE W/H 
PAYR P-DEF COMP W/H 
PAYR P-HEALTH INS W/H 
PAYR P-BASIC LIFE W/H 
PAYR P-DENTL INS W/H 
PLN BD RFDBL DEP PAYBL 
CONSVTN PROJ DEP PAYBL 
DT SPEC REV FD-20 
DT SPEC REV FD-21 
DT SPEC REV FD-30 
DT SPEC REV FD-31 
DT SPEC REV FD-32 
DT CAP PROJ FD-40 
DT WATER ENTR FD-60 
DT SEWER ENTRFD-61 
DT HEA INS INTNL SVC FD-69 
TAILINGS PAYABLE-PAYRL 
TAILINGS PAYABLE-VW 



-302,193.13 

-46,799.03 

-134,249.08 

-66,176.08 

-118,708.52 

-7,092.34 

-17,810.12 

-6,060,786.41 

-1,847,140.31 

-951.78 

-19,387.66 

-138,831.11 

-520.05 

-8,603.97 

-22,309.58 

-2,989.42 

-266,481.58 

-422,086.62 

-134,670.73 

-533,530.24 

-282,409.99 

-585,441.44 

-751,412.52 

-180,389.57 

-323,498.29 

-33,438.15 

-8,197.35 



TOTAL LIABILITES 



12,316,105.07 



FUND 



01 


324001 


01 


324002 


01 


326000 


01 


328000 


01 


329600 


01 


329601 


01 


329602 


01 


333000 


01 


359000 



F/B R-ENCUMBRANCE 

F/B R-RES EXP-SP ART 

F/B R-SNOW DEFICIT 

F/B R-DBT EXCL-SB REV 

F/B RES REDUC FUTR EXCL DEBT 

F/B R- REDUC EXCL DEBT MSBA GR 

F/B R-MSBA GR EXCL DEBT COSTS 

F/B R-EXPEND FR F C 

F/B UNRESERVED 



TOTAL FUND BALANCE 

TOTAL LIABILITES + FUND BALANCE 

FREE CASH CERTIFIED $1,311,875 



-1,371,806.50 

.424,794.74 

72,945.78 

-252,893.00 

-678.727.69 

•14,585.955.00 

-537,153.77 

-500,000.00 

-1,513,332.69 



■19,791.717.61 
■32,107,822.68 



211 







Town of Medfield 










Fund 20 - School Grants 










Fiscal Year 2010 








Account 










Number 
20-004 


Account Title 
S-Community Partnership Gr 


Fund 
86 


6/30/2010 


s 


148.38 


F 


20-005 


F-Drug Free School Grant 


76 


2,871.09 


F 


20-007 


F-Title VIB-Early Childhood 


79 


271.63 


F 


20-008 


F-TitleVIB-941142 


77/78 


(15,375.15) 


F 


20-014 


F-SPED Supprtg Access to Curr 


74 


475.00 


S 


20-035 


S-Subsidiary Agreement Grant 


88 


62,211.54 


S 


20-042 


S-Academic Supp Serv Grant 


35 


3,098.49 


F 


20-045 


F-Teacher Quality Grant 


37 


1,637.22 


S 


20-047 


S-Circuit Breaker Progr 


83 


207,218.92 


S 


20-049 


S-Graduation Safety Grant 


46 


250.00 


s 


20-050 


S-Compass School 


47 


46.12 


F 


20-053 


F-ARRA-IDEA 


85 


766.34 


F 


20-054 


F-ARRA/EEC 


73 


2,500.00 


S 


20-055 


S-K- 1 2 Literacy Grant 
Total 

add 7/7/10 cash receipts for grants 


71 


362.00 
266,481.58 

15,375.15 
281,856.73 



Total Federal 

Total State 

Total School Grants 

add 7/7/10 cash receipts for grants 



(6,853.87) 
273,335.45 
266,481.58 



15,375.15 
281,856.73 



212 



Town of Medfield 

Fund 21- School Revolving Ac's 
Fiscal Year 20 10 



Account 
Number 



Account Title 



Fund 



6/30/2010 



21-003 


School Athletic Revolving 


21/22 


42,255.64 


21-004 


Adult Education 


24/25 


81,034.02 


21-006 


Tuition Revolving 


27 


34,484.29 


21-011 


School Rentals 


41 


41,847.40 


21-016 


School Intramurals(clubs) 


23 


59,016.30 


21-017 


Substitute Teachers 


29 


150.00 


21-019 


Mid Schl Interscholastic(sports) 


20 


18,622.68 


21-020 


Community Partnerhip 


26 


481.37 


21-021 


MEDF Coalition for Public Ed. 


40 


16,049.84 


21-024 


Before/After School Care 


19 


5,834.11 


21-027 


Extracurricular Activity ac 


17 


250.00 


21-028 


H S Parking Revolving ac 


18 


25,740.00 




Subtotal 




325,765.65 


21-001 


School Lunch 




57,554.25 


21-012 


Voluntary Local Education 




6,466.11 


21-023 


Sc Const-$55.6M-Contr. Rev. 




3,774.72 


21-025 


School Construction Legal Settlement 
Subtotal 




28,525.89 




96,320.97 




Grand Total 




422,086.62 



213 



Town of Medfield 

Fund 30 - Town Grants 

Fiscal Year 2010 



Account 
Number 

30-006 
30-020 
30-024 
30-034 
30-042 
30-070 
30-083 
30-085 
30-087 
30-089 
30-093 



Account Title 



06/30/10 



S-Police Drug Education 
S-Title V Public Info. Gr. 
S-State Aid to Library 
S-Water Pollutn Abat-Tit V 
S-Medfield Arts Council Int. Bearing 
S-Senior Formula Grant FY05-FY09 
P-MCHF Subst Abuse Gr CY07-10 
P-MCHF Pol AEDefib Grant 
P-Verizon I-Net Gr FY08-17 
S-BOH Emer Prep Cnslt 
S-DEP-Water Loss Prot 06-06 $40k 



Total 



$ 


691.04 


$ 


3,016.39 


$ 


48,945.88 


$ 


68,258.49 


$ 


5,505.20 


$ 


639.25 


$ 


518.69 


$ 


6.91 


$ 


2,302.86 


$ 


600.02 


$ 


4,186.00 


$ 


- 


$ 


134,670.73 



Total Federal Grants (F) 

Total State Grants (S) 

Total Private Grants (P) 

Total 



131,842.27 
2,828.46 



134,670.73 



214 



Town of Medfield 

Fund 31 - Revolving Ac's 

Fiscal Year 2010 



Account 








Number 


Account Title 




6/30/2010 


31-001 


Sale of Cemetery Lots 


$ 


231,820.00 


31-002 


Cemetery Perpetual Care 


$ 


25,850.00 


31-004 


Park & Recreation Revolving 


$ 


4,545.23 


31-007 


Fire Alarm Revolving 


$ 


18,339.00 


31-010 


Premium on Debt Exclusion Bonds 


$ 


71,985.61 


31-012 


Fire CPR Revolving 


$ 


616.53 


31-017 


Special Investigation Police 


$ 


1,814.02 


31-022 


Police Special Detail 


$ 


70,015.52 


31-024 


Conservation Fees 


$ 


9,321.00 


31-033 


Town Hall Renv Bonding Company 


$ 


3,217.29 


31-036 


Fire Arms Revolving 


$ 


10,074.14 


31-042 


Amb Mileage Fees-Billing Agency 


$ 


27,115.00 


31-043 


Adv Life Support Fees-Billing Ag 


$ 


254.39 


31-048 


Deputy Coll Fees Ac 


$ 


(2,287.00) 


31-050 


Sew Install Engineering Study 


$ 


800.00 


31-051 


Community Gardens 


$ 


2,060.06 


31-053 


Center(COA) Rental Rev 53 E 1/2 


$ 


2,499.13 


31-054 


L Copy/Rntl/Damg Matl Rev 53 E 1/2 


$ 


4,092.06 




Total 

)eposits rec'd in advance for P&R summer progr 


$ 


482,131.98 


C 


$ 


51,398.26 



215 



Town of Medfield 

Fund 32 - Gift A/c's 

Fiscal Year 2010 



Account 






Balance 


Number 


Account Title 




6/30/2010 


32-001 


Cable Access Gift 


$ 


100.00 


32-002 


Fire Gift 


$ 


687.43 


32-003 


Dwight Derby House Gift 


$ 


1,000.00 


32-004 


Civil Defense gift 


$ 


3,075.02 


32-006 


Copeland Gift Police 


$ 


5,616.72 


32-008 


Council on Aging Gift 


$ 


28,207.73 


32-011 


Pondview Sidewalk gift 


$ 


193.87 


32-013 


Drug Wages Norwood Gift 


$ 


742.46 


32-014 


Historical Commission Gift 


$ 


34.00 


32-015 


Long Range Planning Gift 


$ 


447.00 


32-016 


Comm to Study Memorials Gift 


$ 


10,953.44 


32-018 


Memorial Day Gift 


$ 


266.63 


32-020 


Outreach Gift 


$ 


4,218.42 


32-025 


Town Meeting Gift 


$ 


75.00 


32-027 


Ambulance Gift 


$ 


1,328.53 


32-028 


Library Gift 


$ 


21,236.66 


32-030 


Grist Mill Gift 


$ 


21,709.66 


32-031 


Town Common Gift 


$ 


2,531.06 


32-035 


Dare Police Donations 


$ 


4,050.76 


32-038 


COA TRIAD Gift 


$ 


4,971.44 


32-039 


Library Book/Materials Gift 


$ 


17,157.87 


32-041 


Kennel Operations Gift 


$ 


2,756.01 


32-043 


Arts/Cult Council Gift-Est 3/02 


$ 


864.91 


32-044 


Entering Medfield Sign Gift ac 


$ 


2,000.00 


32-046 


COA MACC Furn/Equi/Access Gift 


$ 


5,444.52 


32-047 


Downtown Study Gift 


$ 


1,704.93 


32-048 


Fiberoptic Gift- WAN 


$ 


2,539.15 


32-050 


Police Gift 


$ 


2,104.50 


32-051 


COA Driver Salary Gift 


$ 


121.15 


32-052 


Spr St Gas Stn Eng Gift 


$ 


1,638.31 


32-053 


COA-Jenks Prof Dev Gift ac 


$ 


41,873.24 


32-054 


Hospital Cemetery Maint Gift 


$ 


430.00 




Total Town 


$ 


190,080.42 




School 






32-005 


School Gifts-Fd30 


$ 


92,329.57 




Total School 


$ 


92,329.57 




Grand Total 


$ 


282,409.99 



216 



Town of Medfield 

Fund 33 - Chapter 90 

Fiscal Year 2010 



Account 

Number Account Title 



Ending Balance 
6/30/2010 



33-011 



North+Green St Design $235k 



$ (10,774.47) Expenditure driven grant 
Spend first get reimb later 



Total 



$ (10,774.47) 



CH90 reimb requested 8/31/10 cash ree'd 9/22/10 







Town of Medfield 

Fund 90 - Other Agency Fund 

Student Activity Accounts 

Fiscal Year 2010 




Account 
Number 


Acccount Title 








Balance 
6/30/2010 


90-311 
90-312 
90-313 
90-321 
90-331 


Dale Street School 
Wheelock School 
Memorial School 
Middle School 
High School 

Total 








5,288.42 

1,802.88 

6,425.35 

43,523.67 

114,603.60 

171,643.92 



Respectfully submitted, 

Joy A. Ricciuto, CGA 
Town Accountant 



217 



WATER ENTERPRISE FUND 

FISCAL YEAR 2010 

ESTIMATED REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 



WATER ENTERPRISE REVENUES & AVAILABLE FUNDS: 
USER CHARGES 

TOTAL WATER REVENUES 



TOTAL COSTS APPROPRIATED IN THE WATER DEPARTMENT 

ORGANIZATION CODE 60-410-1 AND 60-410-2: 

PERSONNEL $ 

OPERATIONS $ 

RESERVE FUND PROJECTS: 
- NEW METERS $ 



SUB-TOTAL WATER DEPARTMENT COSTS 



299,753 
494,134 



833,887 



ALLOCATED EXPENSES APPROPRIATED IN OTHER 

DEPARTMENTAL BUDGETS: 
DEBT SERVICE: 

PRINCIPAL 01-710-2 $ 163,764 

INTEREST 01-751-2 $ 56.357 

TOTAL DEBT SERVICE 



220,121 



261,478 



INSURANCE $ 62,081 

CNTY RETIREMENT CONTRIBUTE $ 59,006 

SHARED EMPLOYEES $ 132,722 

SHARED FACILITIES $ 7,669 
SUB-TOTAL ALLOCATED EXPENSES 



TOTAL-ALLOCATED EXPENSES 
ESTIMATED EXPENSES 
ESTIMATED WATER FUND SURPLUS (DEFICIT; 



CALCULATION OF GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY: 
ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 
LESS: TOTAL COSTS 
LESS: PRIOR YEAR DEFICIT 

GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY 

SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS APPROPRIATED IN ENTERPRISE FUND 

ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 

TAXATION 

FREE CASH 

NON-ENTERPRISE AVAILABLE FUNDS 

TOTAL SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS 
APPROPRIATED IN THE WATER ENTERPRISE FUND 



481,599 



(1,315,486) 



$ 


$ 
$ 
$ 


1,315,486 
(1,315,486) 


$ 


$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 


1,315,486 


$ 


1,315,486 



FY10 WATER ENTERPRISE RATE STRUCTURE 



0-10,000 

10,001 -35,000 

35,001 - 70,000 

OVER 70,000 GALLONS 



$27.68 

$2.40 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 
$3.81 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 
$5.35 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 



218 



SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 

FISCAL YEAR 2010 

ESTIMATED REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 



SEWER ENTERPRISE REVENUES & AVAILABLE FUNDS: 
USER CHARGES 
TOTAL SEWER REVENUES 



$ 1,436,373 



$ 1,436,373 



TOTAL COSTS APPROPRIATED IN THE SEWER DEPARTMENT 
ORGANIZATION CODE 61-420-1 AND 61-420-2: 

PERSONNEL 

OPERATIONS 

RESERVE FUND PROJECTS: 

- INFILTRATION INFLOW 

- NEW METERS 

SUB-TOTAL SEWER DEPARTMENT COSTS 



218,972 
604,130 



50,000 
40,000 



ALLOCATED EXPENSES APPROPRIATED IN OTHER 
DEPARTMENTAL BUDGETS: 
DEBT SERVICE: 

PRINCIPAL 01-710-2 
INTEREST 01-751-2 

MWPAT II Loan Orig Fee+Bond Counsel cost 
TOTAL DEBT SERVICE 

INSURANCE 

CNTY RETIREMENT CONTRIBUTE 
SHARED EMPLOYEES 
SHARED FACILITIES 

FY08 RES FD TRF FR GEN FD FOR OPER EXF 
SUB-TOTAL ALLOCATED EXPENSES 

TOTAL-ALLOCATED EXPENSES 

ESTIMATED EXPENSES 

ESTIMATED SEWER FUND SURPLUS (DEFICIT) 



$ 


159,798 


$ 


86,709 


$ 


9,086 


$ 


39,730 


$ 


54,608 


$ 


132,722 


$ 


5,618 


$ 


35,000 



255,593 



267,678 



$ (1,436,373) 
$ - 



CALCULATION OF GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY: 
ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 
LESS: TOTAL COSTS 
LESS: PRIOR YEAR DEFICIT 



$ 1,436,373 
$ (1,436,373) 

$ 



GENERAL FUND SUBSIDY 

SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS APPROPRIATED IN ENTERPRISE FUND 

ENTERPRISE FUND REVENUES AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 

TAXATION 

FREE CASH 

NON-ENTERPRISE AVAILABLE FUNDS 

TOTAL SOURCES OF FUNDING FOR COSTS 
APPROPRIATED IN THE SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 



1,436,373 



$ 1,436,373 



FY10 SEWER ENTERPRISE RATE STRUCTURE: 



RESIDENTIAL 



0-10,000 

10,001 AND OVER 

COMMERCIAL 



0-10,000 

10,001 AND OVER 

SEPTIC DISPOSAL FEE 



BASED ON 75% OF WATER CONSUMPTION 



$79.23 

$7.93 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 
BASED ON 100% OF WATER CONSUMPTION 



$79.23 EVERY 6 MONTHS 

$7.93 PER THOUSAND GALLONS 
$110.00/1 ,000 GAL 



219 



WATER & SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 
ESTABLISHED JULY 1, 1991 (FISCAL YEAR 1992) 
UNDER MASS GENERAL LAWS, CH 40/SECTION 39K 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2010 

WATER 

Total Services 
Added Services 
Thousand Gallons Pumped 
Thousand Gallons Sold 

Water Retained Earnings - Reserved 

Water Retained Earnings - Unreserved $ 189,338 certified 



SEWER 

Total Services 2,542 

Added Services 59 

Sewer Retained Earnings - Reserved $ 63,236 

Sewer Retained Earnings - Unreserved $ 117,154 certified 





3,904 




28 




487,005 




300,009 


$ 


562,074 


$ 


189,338 



220 



PERPETUAL CARE 2010 

Connolly, Maureen S. $ 1,100.00 

Jones, Valerie $ 2,200.00 

Wood, Robert L. & Joan T. $ 1,100.00 

Walton, Patricia $ 1,100.00 

Joseph, Maria $ 1,100.00 

Holborn, Carrin $ 2,200.00 

Olsen, Neal & Virginia $ 550.00 

Ferguson, Scott $ 1,100.00 

Mitchell, H Tracy $ 3,300.00 

Mann, William & Elizabeth $ 2,200.00 

Caruso, Alfonse $ 1,100.00 

Tracey, Dennis & Janet $ 2,200.00 

TOTAL $19,250.00 



221 



MEDFIELD BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




Lawrence E. Abar 

1968-1972 



I Mil 

I 



Herbert B. Burr 

1955-1958 




Arthur J. Farrar 

1973-1976 




John F. Ganlev 

1990-1993 




Charles F. Allen 

1935-1937 




L J 

Kenneth M. 
Childs, Jr. 

1981-1985 




Mark L. Fisher 

2008-Present 




Charles W. Haigh 

1934-1937 
1940-1946 



i 



— 1 




k A 

R. Edward Beard 

1975-1981 




k A 

Richard G. Connors 

1964-1967 




k" A 

Walter M. Frank 

1967-1970 




& 




k A 

Frank G. Haley 

1927-1954 



I 



■ 



Austin C. Buchanan 

1959-1968 




Richard P. DeSorgher 

1980-1983 




Robert H. Fraser 

1941-1943 




John T. Harney 

1994-2000 



222 




L A 

Tidal B. Henry 

1993-1996 





'^%: 



L" J 

Harry A. Kelleher 

1968-1977 

r *i 




Joseph L. Marcionette 

1947-1964 1971-1975 

r Ti 




k L ~A 

Weston G. Kosti 

1970-1973 

k 

i 






Edward R. Perry 

1963-1966 




Ik A 

William R. Reagan 

1976-1981 



l a \r~ a 

William E. McCarthy Sandra G. Munsey 

1946-1955 1977-1980 

r i r i 





l a k A 

Osier L. Peterson Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 

2000 to Present 1988-1994 





Paul B. Rhuda 

1999-2008 



I A 

Joseph A. Roberts 

1954-1963 




Ik A 

Robert J. Larkin 

1981-1990 

r ^ 




L A 

William F. Nourse 

1985-1988 

r i 



o 



ii 



Clarence A. Purvis 

1996-1999 




LT" A 

Ann B. Thompson 
1983-Presenl 



223 



INDEX 

Elected Town Officers 4 

Appointments By 

Fire Chief 1 1 

Health, Board of 1 1 

Moderator 1 1 

Planning Board 12 

School Committee 12 

Selectmen, Board of 4 

Treasurer/Collector 1 1 

Warrant Committee 12 

Town Department Reports 

Aging, Council on 78 

Animal Control Officer/Inspector 38 

Appeals on Zoning, Board of 28 

Assessors, Board of 30 

Conservation Commission 49 

Energy Committee 52 

Fire Department 40 

Health, Board of 71 

Historical Commission 54 

Historic District Commission 57 

Inspection Department 44 

Library Trustees 64 

Medfield Emergency Management Agency 37 

Memorial Day Address 69 

Memorial Public Library 61 

Memorials, Committee to Study 65 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 83 

Norfolk County Commissioners 90 

Parks and Recreation Commission 80 

Personnel Board 32 

Planning Board 25 

Police Department 34 

Public Works Department 19 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 48 

Selectmen, Board of 17 

Town Clock, Keepers of 60 



Tri County Regional Vocational Technical School 92 

Tree Warden and Insect Pest Control 82 

Veteran's Services 67 

Water and Sewerage Board 23 

School Department Reports 

School Committee 105 

Superintendent of Schools 108 

Staff Directory 110 

Director of Finance and Operations 126 

Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 129 

Graduation Exercises, High School 132 

Thomas A. Blake Middle School 143 

Dale Street School 146 

Ralph Wheelock School 1 50 

Memorial School 152 

Pupil Services Department 156 

Athletic Director 160 

Community Education Program 165 

Town Clerk's Records 

Births 168 

Marriages 1 70 

Deaths 171 

Town Meetings and Elections 

Warrant for Special State Election, January 19, 2010 173 

Annual Town Election, March 29,2010 175 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting, April 26,2010 177 

State Primary, September 14,2010 190 

State Election, November 2,2010 197 

Financial Reports 

Assessors, Board of 206 

Collector of Taxes 207 

Perpetual Care 223 

Town Accountant 2 1 2 

Treasurer 208 

Water and Sewer Enterprise Funds 220